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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 203–217.
Published: 01 May 2016
... altered or transformed. Katsushika Hokusai's 1829 woodblock print, “Under the Wave off Kanagawa,” is the world's most iconic portrait of ocean waves. It has been reproduced, quoted, and repurposed over the last two centuries in a widening circle of representations of the unruly, powerful sea. Today's...
Image
Published: 01 May 2016
Figure 1. Katsushika Hokusai, Under a Wave at Kanagawa, c. 1829, woodblock print Figure 1. Katsushika Hokusai, Under a Wave at Kanagawa, c. 1829, woodblock print More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 57–77.
Published: 01 May 2013
... ocean ecology, but also spurred a public passion for all things oceanographic, best embodied in a wave of “Carsonalia”—consumer items and experiences ranging from hats, to Book of the Month Club editions, to liner notes for the NBC Symphony's recording of Debussy's La Mer. While these items inspired and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 117–146.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Daegan Miller Abstract In the fall of 1846, the first of 3,000 African American settlers set foot on their 40-acre plots in the Great Northern Wilderness of New York State, a place we now call the “forever wild” wilderness of the Adirondack State Park. These black settlers were the initial wave of...
Image
Published: 01 May 2016
Figure 5. “The Graph of Global Warming,” on Chris Madden Cartoons, http://www.chrismadden.co.uk/cartoon-gallery/environment-cartoon-hokusai-the-great-wave/ . Copyright Chris Madden. Reproduced with Permission. Figure 5. “The Graph of Global Warming,” on Chris Madden Cartoons, http More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 261–276.
Published: 01 May 2014
... they have long understood their missions. In defining the objects and objectives of the environmental humanities in this way, and by urging environmental historians and ecocritics to view their work in terms of this larger project, we are not seeking to initiate another “turn” or “wave” in these...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 338–342.
Published: 01 May 2018
.... 1 ). The irregular movements of these dials are accompanied by sound recordings and light projections. Seven different choreographies installed in the software of the system perform a posthuman dance in strange rhythms with the waves splashing onto the ancient stones beyond Haydarpasha’s elegant...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 227–232.
Published: 01 May 2016
... : South End Press , 1981 . Linder Joshua . “ African Primate Diversity Threatened by ‘New Wave’ of Industrial Oil Palm Expansion .” African Primates 8 ( 2013 ): 25 - 38 . McKittrick Katherine . Demonic Grounds: Black Women and the Cartographies of Struggle . Minneapolis...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 172–195.
Published: 01 November 2016
... four drummers),” derived from traditional Iñupiaq and Gwich’in dance music. 32 “The Drums of Winter,” “Deep and Different Thunder,” and “Drums of Fire, Drums of Stone” shake the ground in pounding waves of complex, overriding, and colliding rhythms. 33 Surging erratically between the first and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 40–59.
Published: 01 May 2017
... infill, lay a remnant beach. No echo of the waves that a century ago hissed up the sand of that beach reached my ear where it rested on the grass. After a year living in Elizabeth Bay, I moved on to a series of rental addresses elsewhere in the city, very rarely returning there. In 2015, however, I...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 175–178.
Published: 01 May 2015
... dry wind that sweeps through Tokyo at the end of winter. The spring breeze may be one which blows off cherry blossoms or which caresses the waves ... As we find our gladdened or pained selves in a wind that scatters the cherry blossoms, so do we apprehend our wilting selves in the very heat of summer...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 1–18.
Published: 01 May 2014
... with the rise in global populations; nested within the challenges of nuclear waste storage; enfolded in carbon emissions; caught up in the rise of tsunami waves; orbiting the planet as space trash; stuck in the stagnant centre of the vortex that is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch; and fermenting in the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 235–239.
Published: 01 November 2016
... choice logs. Figure 1. Stag beetle ( Lucanus cervus ). Image courtesy of Maria Fremlin Figure 1. Stag beetle (Lucanus cervus). Image courtesy of Maria Fremlin Eating apples in the graveyard in the company of a wizened botanist, I was also given a more profound lesson in finitude. Waving...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 433–453.
Published: 01 November 2017
... civilization has been performed since the early 1960s. The departure point of this search is that electromagnetic waves, particularly extraterrestrial artificial radio emissions, would be possible to detect, as it was explained by Giuseppe Cocconi and Philip Morrison in a 1959 Nature article. 2 The...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 123–140.
Published: 01 May 2012
.... Silent Spring led to “a wave of anxiety” 43 that moved swiftly across America and into Europe. But this public wave was the outer ripple of the multitude of inner feelings encircling and inscribing citizen voices. Everyday observations lead to distress: of the “Milwaukee woman” writing of “the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 196–214.
Published: 01 November 2016
... rendering noise itself as something predictable and calculable. By parsing different noises in terms of “wave equations,” noise became signal. As signal, it conveyed the fact that high-frequency sounds rapidly attenuated (decayed) in seawater, whereas low-frequency sounds (less than 500 Hz) experienced...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 226–240.
Published: 01 May 2018
... kilometers to the north of Melbourne. The city itself recorded its highest-ever temperature at 46.4°C, as well as the longest run of consecutive days over 40°C. 3 This massive heat wave hit at the end of a decade-long drought that had sucked the moisture from the vegetation and desiccated the organic...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 378–397.
Published: 01 November 2017
... ultraviolet waves, streamers, draperies, and spirals. One of the participants at an astrobiology conference in Szczecin, Poland, commented on our planet’s intricate ultraviolet glow as follows: “We do not realize how Sun-like the Earth is.” The scientific terminology is indeed telling: earthshine/sunshine...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 325–340.
Published: 01 November 2017
... the “ecofeminist” label even as others continue to correct perceived misreadings of the field. See Moore, “Ecofeminism as Third Wave Feminism?”; and Phillips and Rumens, “Introducing Contemporary Ecofeminism.” 32. Limerick, “Imagined Frontiers.” 33. Anker, “Ecological Colonization of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 191–202.
Published: 01 May 2016
... garden of live flowers, she exclaims her wish that they could talk: ‘O Tiger-lily,’ said Alice, addressing herself to one that was waving gracefully about in the wind, ‘I wish you could talk!’” “‘We can talk,’ said the Tiger-lily: ‘when there's anybody worth talking to.’ Alice was so astonished...