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volcanism

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 273–294.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Nigel Clark; Alexandra Gormally; Hugh Tuffen Abstract In 2009, exploratory drilling of geothermal wells in Iceland’s Krafla volcanic caldera unexpectedly struck magma. The fact that the encounter did not have catastrophic consequences has excited considerable interest—and an international research...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 149–171.
Published: 01 November 2016
... argument through engagement with two sites. One concerns the inscription of human activities in volcanic rock, the second the embodiment of isotopes in living beings. These examples raise questions about the multiple scales of geosociality, which intertwine biography and Earth “itself.” Copyright © 2016...
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 1. This section of ice core was drilled in December 2010 from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The layers of ice are visible, but also notable is a layer of volcanic ash deposited approximately 21,000 years ago. Photographer: Heide Roop. Source: United States Antarctic Program Photo Library More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 1. This section of ice core was drilled in December 2010 from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The layers of ice are visible, but also notable is a layer of volcanic ash deposited approximately 21,000 years ago. Photographer: Heide Roop. Source: United States Antarctic Program Photo Library More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 1. This section of ice core was drilled in December 2010 from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The layers of ice are visible, but also notable is a layer of volcanic ash deposited approximately 21,000 years ago. Photographer: Heide Roop. Source: United States Antarctic Program Photo Library More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 213–225.
Published: 01 May 2018
... alienation that Irvine highlights, these authors find encounters with deep time to render a surprising intimacy. Building on N. Clark’s earlier work on volcanism, which concerns the ways in which “violent destratification” is part of the emergence of new, generative powers of diversification, 44 these...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 309–324.
Published: 01 November 2017
... are good reasons to believe, he argues, that the “seeds of life” were catapulted toward our planet after a volcanic eruption (which used to occur frequently on our neighboring planet) or reached us on board a Martian meteorite. 29 All of this illustrates a point that Helmreich has underlined...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 217–232.
Published: 01 May 2014
... of the Anthropocene, albeit often no less dramatic. On a small Antarctic island, for example, Salgado depicts a colony of penguins within a barren volcanic landscape, surrounded by glaciers and a sea that dissolves into mist. “The feeling of reaching another planet is particular[ly] intense on...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 77–94.
Published: 01 May 2016
... away from the hot spot that birthed them—as a result of shifting tectonic plates—processes of erosion by wind and wave gradually return them to the sea. Far out in the chain, Midway Atoll is now nothing more than an accumulation of sand around coral reefs that once encircled a volcanic island long...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 295–309.
Published: 01 May 2018
... where precedent and rupture come together, with neither diminishing the other. Other spectral beasts—such as the Hound of the Baskervilles—do this too. They radiate the infernal heat of deep volcanic histories, haunting granite moorland swathed in shallow-rooted grass and lichens. But the Shuck is a dog...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 150–170.
Published: 01 May 2018
... leave their remote rocks, the Geirfuglasker, when these were engulfed as a result of volcanic activity, thus becoming more vulnerable to (over)hunting. Great auk remnants remain symbolically rich in a contemporary context of unprecedented numbers of species extinctions in the Anthropocene. 3 In a...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 147–167.
Published: 01 May 2013
... of humankind. And one all the more remarkable because at the time its consequences pointed not towards the promise of even greater numbers and wider geographical range for this already well-established—species, but on the contrary its extinction. The event was the Sumatran Mount Toba volcanic...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 203–217.
Published: 01 May 2016
... has suggested, Hokusai's wave is easily adapted to a “growing focus on the real world operations of nature—volcanic eruptions, typhoons, floods, and earthquakes,” perhaps particularly because so many “have occurred in the Pacific region.” 18 Guth's analysis nicely accounts for such representations...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 101–123.
Published: 01 May 2014
....” 70 In this storyline, scientists artificially made natural processes more efficient, but in principle there was no difference between, for example, volcanic eruptions and human efforts to release huge volumes of sulphur aerosols into the atmosphere. 71 The implied meaning of this storyline was...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 181–203.
Published: 01 November 2017
...Figure 1. This section of ice core was drilled in December 2010 from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The layers of ice are visible, but also notable is a layer of volcanic ash deposited approximately 21,000 years ago. Photographer: Heide Roop. Source: United States Antarctic Program Photo Library...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 194–215.
Published: 01 May 2019
... effects? At the molecular level, this chemical is made of two sulfur atoms joining a central carbon atom. In its purest form CS2 is an extremely volatile, colorless liquid with a sweet odor. The industrial version is yellowish and smells like rotting cabbage. Tiny amounts are released in volcanic...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 261–276.
Published: 01 May 2014
... White is usually invoked by ecocritics today only in order to cudgel Christianity, his work prefigures various ecocritical attempts to engage with environmental history—for example, Jonathan Bate's rereading of Romantic poetry in the context of the bad weather caused by the Tambora volcanic eruption of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 1–18.
Published: 01 May 2014
... temporal orders. Birthdays are a recurring theme: Hand Held Lava (2003), a pair of short films made in the year of her thirtieth birthday as part of her extended Physical Geology project, includes footage of volcanologists at work beneath Eldfell, a 200 metre volcanic cone formed during an eruption in...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 215–234.
Published: 01 November 2016
... genesis of life “when Earth was blanketed by a thick noxious atmosphere tinged orange with hydrocarbon smog,” “bathed in lethal radiation,” and disrupted “by a steady stream of violent volcanic eruptions, asteroid bombardments and comet impacts.” Early life obtained matter and energy from minerals, and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 433–453.
Published: 01 November 2017
.... Theories of external threats emphasize external forces of nature that are stronger than the technological society, such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, asteroids, or the real or imagined external threats from alien civilizations. Internal threats—which have dominated much of human historical...