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ultraviolet

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 378–397.
Published: 01 November 2017
... ethnographically, by using the angle of ultraviolet. Specifically, I focus on the ultraviolet spectrum to examine how astrobiologists look at celestial bodies, planetary atmospheres, the skin, and the eye. More generally, this article is a reflection on how outer space can be apprehended from a humanities...
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 2. Jerusalem artichoke in human vision (left), simulated butterfly vision (middle), and simulated bee vision (right), photographed by Klaus Schmitt. Both butterflies and bees can see into the near-ultraviolet (UV-A). Used with permission. Figure 2. Jerusalem artichoke in human vision More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 2. Jerusalem artichoke in human vision (left), simulated butterfly vision (middle), and simulated bee vision (right), photographed by Klaus Schmitt. Both butterflies and bees can see into the near-ultraviolet (UV-A). Used with permission. Figure 2. Jerusalem artichoke in human vision More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 2. Jerusalem artichoke in human vision (left), simulated butterfly vision (middle), and simulated bee vision (right), photographed by Klaus Schmitt. Both butterflies and bees can see into the near-ultraviolet (UV-A). Used with permission. Figure 2. Jerusalem artichoke in human vision More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 300–308.
Published: 01 November 2017
... Memorial Museum of Cosmonautics, Moscow, Russia. Photo by Stefan Helmreich. Or consider the universe filtered through the wriggling waveforms of ultraviolet light, which reveals that the shine of Earth and the shine of animal eyes are not simple reflections of sunlight but, like sunlight, emanations...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 309–324.
Published: 01 November 2017
... red planet is commonly envisaged as “a dead world: freeze-dried, geologically static, and irradiated daily with lethal ultraviolet.” 33 It is true that none of the landers or rovers have so far conclusively identified microfossils or other traces of microbial life. Yet an increasing number of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 85–102.
Published: 01 May 2012
... collective & personal. Working with trance while sitting in Congressional hearings i recorded details into a notebook. If bees can detect ultraviolet rays, there are surely more possibilities in language & government. 43 12 Bennett, Vibrant Matter, xii. 13 Hillman, “The...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 129–148.
Published: 01 May 2017
..., and polyvocal aspects. Kac, then, incorporated the artist’s gene into bacteria exhibited in the gallery. Web-based participants were able to manipulate an ultraviolet light, initiating bacterial mutations and transforming the controversial biblical passage in real time. As critic Steve Tomasula...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 129–149.
Published: 01 May 2018
... years, research in human biology has found evidence of a similar phenomenon among human beings: human skin “is able to ‘sense’ ultraviolet light in the same way as [human] eyes because skin cells contain rhodopsin, the same photosensitive receptor that the eye uses to detect light.” 31 Because this...