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toxic

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 86–106.
Published: 01 May 2018
... claiming inconclusive evidence and uncertainty about the toxic effects of the war, my southern Lebanese interlocutors insisted on causally linking Israel’s weapons to the perceived surge in cancer, infertility, and environmental degradation since 2006. Their insistence that war was causing this ongoing...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 101–107.
Published: 01 May 2019
...Olga Cielemęcka; Cecilia Åsberg © 2019 Olga Cielemęcka and Cecilia Åsberg 2019 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). This special section on toxic embodiment examines variously situated bodies, land- and waterscapes...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 152–173.
Published: 01 May 2019
...Sasha Litvintseva Abstract Asbestos is a fibrous mineral. Airborne asbestos—similar to nuclear radiation and chemical atmospheric pollutants—is invisible to the naked eye, and living and breathing alongside it has deferred toxic effects on human bodies. The toxicity of asbestos operates by...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 216–238.
Published: 01 May 2019
... these works, Straube explores the meaning of this correlation between ticks and transing bodies for environmental ethics as well as for the forging of livable lives for trans people. Toxicity surfaces as a link in these works. The notion of feminist figuration, developed by philosopher Rosi Braidotti...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 194–215.
Published: 01 May 2019
...Miriam Tola Abstract Located in the Prenestino neighborhood of Rome, Italy, the former chemical-textile plant Ex-SNIA Viscosa has been a site of labor exploitation, toxicity, and struggle since the 1920s. Comprising postindustrial ruins, an urban lake, and myriad species, the area has been...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 180–193.
Published: 01 May 2019
...Michael Marder Abstract In this article, Michael Marder interprets the “toxic flood” we are living or dying through as a global dump. On his reading, multiple levels of existence—from the psychic to the physiological, from the environmental-elemental to the planetary—are being converted into a dump...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 230–254.
Published: 01 November 2017
... the Other and the Anti-cancer Survival Kit reveal the political life of cancer to be animated by cellular and culinary anarchisms, bile, toxicity, frustration, and, in da Costa’s words, “more than even I can take.” © 2017 Lindsay Kelley 2017 This is an open access article distributed under the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 52–71.
Published: 01 May 2019
..., and other minerals in Chhattisgarh state. Further, itineraries of conflict emphasize the embodied presence of indigenous communities and their activists in areas demarcated for the extraction of minerals, timber, and other resources in the face of continued armed conflict or toxic pollution. More...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 137–151.
Published: 01 May 2019
... destruction of the built environment. Linking these experiences, the argument sets up and explores an analytical space within which the toxic modernity of planetary capitalism can resonate, structurally, with the racist violence of state colonialism: a space that also, the author suggests, describes an...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 239–241.
Published: 01 May 2019
... collection of essays demonstrates that toxic embodiment is a crucial lens for rethinking the human, not as an abstract force acting on the world, but as fleshy beings who are inseparable from their transcorporeal entanglements within the world. While the public concern for toxins seems overshadowed by the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 287–290.
Published: 01 May 2014
... lifetimes. It will persist in the geological record and in our genetic legacies. Earlier this year, researchers in The Lancet Neurology announced that we are in the midst of a “global, silent pandemic of neurodevelopmental toxicity.” 2 That's your brain, and my brain, taking a hit—and it's worse for...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 174–179.
Published: 01 May 2019
... counts, various reproductive tract malformations, asthma, obesity, and cancer, among other toxic effects. 7 How might we shift the frames and scales of conventional forms of signification in order to bring into focus the often inscrutable biological and cultural writing intrinsic to this...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 27–51.
Published: 01 May 2019
... environmental injustice owes much to the invisibility of its sources. 1 These sources are myriad. They range from the difficulties of discerning toxic agents to the under-resourcing of research that might uncover the pathways from chemical exposure to negative health impacts. Similarly, the marginalization...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 242–246.
Published: 01 May 2019
... Steingraber’s investigation of environmental contaminants and cancer in Living Downstream to Nancy Langston’s work on women’s bodies, ecosystems, and synthetic hormones in Toxic Bodies , ecologists and environmental historians have long shown the human embodiment of environmental damage. 13 Kafer and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 295–300.
Published: 01 May 2014
... hermit crabs, she exposed herself to these vulnerabilities, as well as to the toxic properties of oil itself, as she watched entire ecological communities die. Bishop began working with the uneasy alchemy of the pharmakon, thinking about how to transform poisonous oil into a cure. Classically, the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 187–212.
Published: 01 May 2018
... produced toxicants, from ultrafine particulate matter to BTEX, arsenic, and nitrogen dioxide. This inorganic matter has silently and systematically disrupted bodies (human and otherwise), landscapes, and politics in several ways and at different scales in Puchuncaví. Insofar as VIC is part of the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 108–136.
Published: 01 May 2019
... cultural critic Lauren Berlant theorized as “slow death,” 6 that is, a way of organizing life conditions that lets big segments of populations die. I use Mbembe’s and Berlant’s frameworks as lenses to discuss cancer as an effect of toxic and unhealthy environments, workspaces, and living conditions...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 283–286.
Published: 01 May 2014
... David . “ Ecology and Identity: A Comparative Perspective of the Negotiation of ‘Nativeness' .” In Toxic Belonging: Identity and Ecology in Southern Africa , edited by Wylie Dan , 178 - 198 . Newcastle, UK : Cambridge Scholars Publishing , 2008 . O'Gorman Emily . “ Experiments...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 89–105.
Published: 01 May 2016
... Physics Technicians are charged with containing nuclear materials, ensuring that contamination does not move beyond “controlled” 2 areas of the site. Workers, for example, must be “released” by an HPT before they can leave radioactive space, shedding protective gear like toxic skin in preparation for...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 204–229.
Published: 01 November 2017
... up. When resistant super weeds emerged as major obstacles to the expansion of transgenic soy, growers responded by intensifying fumigations with glyphosate-based herbicides and brought back some of the strongest and most toxic herbicides, such as Paraquat and 2,4–dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4–D...