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Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 4. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. Figure 4. Ann Lislegaard More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 5. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. Figure 5. Ann Lislegaard More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 3. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. Figure 3. Ann Lislegaard More
Image
Published: 01 May 2014
Figure 6 The characteristic time scales of some key processes in the Earth system: atmospheric composition (blue), climate system (red), ecological system (green), and socio-economic system (purple). Image courtesy of the IPCC, Third Assessment Report, Figure 5.1. 42 Figure 6. The More
Image
Published: 01 May 2015
Figure 7. An estuary-shaped life, with the Severn bridges as time–space fulcrums (from a personal Google map). Figure 7. An estuary-shaped life, with the Severn bridges as time–space fulcrums (from a personal Google map). More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 3. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. Figure 3. Ann Lislegaard More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 4. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. Figure 4. Ann Lislegaard More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 5. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. Figure 5. Ann Lislegaard More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 3. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. Figure 3. Ann Lislegaard More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 4. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. Figure 4. Ann Lislegaard More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 5. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. Figure 5. Ann Lislegaard More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 239–241.
Published: 01 May 2019
... colonialism and capitalism, scramble conventional understandings of time, agency, and ontological categorization. Sasha Litvintseva, for example, grapples with the temporality of asbestos, noting the “unfolding of the deferred yet certain effects of asbestos on the toxic body and the unpayable debt owed to it...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 257–272.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Richard D. G. Irvine Abstract What does it mean to do violence in deep time? How is deep time evoked in our understanding of environmental harm? Environmental transformations have figured prominently in the recent history of Mongolia. Shifts in land use have been associated with severe pasture...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 295–309.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Jonathan Woolley Abstract Drawing in nightmares, shadows, and loneliness, this article follows a rarely trodden and difficult path across the shifting geology of Norfolk, a track marked by fleeting glimpses and horrible signs of the deadly consequences of deep time and human choice. A subject of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 226–240.
Published: 01 May 2018
.... The idea that a never-before-witnessed event is unprecedented calls into question the shallow temporal frames through which deep time environmental phenomena are understood in Australian settler culture and offers an insight into often unnoticed ways in which contemporary society struggles with the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 273–294.
Published: 01 May 2018
... facility is now being set up to explore energy generation and other possibilities of closer engagement with magma. We take this event as an incitement to explore how the Earth-changing “violence” of volcanic or igneous processes might be seen not simply as happening in time but as both generative and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 213–225.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Franklin Ginn; Michelle Bastian; David Farrier; Jeremy Kidwell Abstract The fractured timespace of the Anthropocene brings distant pasts and futures into the present. Thinking about deep time is challenging: deep time is strange and warps our sense of belonging and our relationships to Earth forces...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 13–33.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Figure 6 The characteristic time scales of some key processes in the Earth system: atmospheric composition (blue), climate system (red), ecological system (green), and socio-economic system (purple). Image courtesy of the IPCC, Third Assessment Report, Figure 5.1. 42 Figure 6. The...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 1–11.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Margret Grebowicz Abstract This paper is part of my larger project to underscore the significance of critical theories of mass society for the environmental humanities. I offer a reading of James Balog's Extreme Ice Survey (EIS), in particular the time-lapse films of glaciers receding, which I...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 1–18.
Published: 01 May 2014
...David Farrier Abstract This article argues that the Anthropocene is marked by haunted time. As the ‘geological agents’ of climate change, as Dipesh Chakrabarty has put it, we both identify with ‘deep time’ processes and conjure the ghosts of those whose lives to come will be shaped in drastic ways...