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the ontological turn

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 1–17.
Published: 01 May 2017
...Erin Fitz-Henry Abstract In this article I pose a series of questions about the relationships between the temporal rhythms of late capitalism and the flourishing of those relational “onto-epistemologies” so celebrated by recent theorists of the ontological turn. Bringing together recent research in...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 169–186.
Published: 01 May 2013
... are, in effect, social atoms. Curiously, 20 th -century philosophy has largely turned a blind eye and deaf ear to the vast philosophical implications of the second scientific revolution in 20 th -century science, among them a correlative moral ontology of internal relations and social wholes. The...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 95–117.
Published: 01 May 2016
...Hugo Reinert Abstract Can a stone be a critter? Placing multispecies studies in conversation with the geological turn, this article examines the place of a particular sacrifice stone in the ambit of a coastal mining development in northern Norway. The argument develops a reading of resource...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 180–193.
Published: 01 May 2019
..., senses, and minds, not to mention our worlds, without individuating us in this targeting, as indifferent and random as the global dump that nourishes it. Disrupting metabolism at every scrambled register of existence, it waxes into what Marder calls “ontological toxicity,” the mangled parts of the dump...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 37–56.
Published: 01 May 2016
... choreograph an ontological state. Conducting an outmoded pregnancy test with live Xenopus frogs, we probed the contours of this gap. As we took an antiquated bioassay out of medical archives, we conducted a performative experiment—an intervention that blurred the boundaries between performance art, science...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 398–417.
Published: 01 November 2017
... part of worlding processes and projects that further these frontiers. The emphasis on “microbial ontologies” is designed to draw attention to the increasing expediency of conceptualizing extreme earthly ecologies as analogues for other planetary worlds, as a way of tracing the relational trajectories...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 215–234.
Published: 01 November 2016
... the implications of ME for the environmental humanities in general and for Anthropocene narratives in particular. ME relies on non-Darwinian evolutionary principles. In common with other branches of Earth system science, it also destabilizes prevailing ontological categories. Life becomes more...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 359–377.
Published: 01 November 2017
... turn, provide a frame through which to resignify the meaning of the space cabin in the history of American spaceflight: from an emblem of technoscientific supremacy to a place of interdependency. © 2017 Leah V. Aronowsky 2017 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 55–75.
Published: 01 May 2014
... ontological question of what it means to be free human beings in the world of nature, intended as a finite, temporal world. From an ecocritical perspective, Badlands' 1950s setting lends itself to a retrospective illumination of the forces that have contributed to the present problematic human-nature relation...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 129–149.
Published: 01 May 2018
... condition of creativity, open up new modes of receptivity and responsiveness to species extinctions? This essay turns to philosophies of becoming and to recent research in the biological sciences to explore this possibility. I suggest that attending to the heterogeneity of experience alerts us to more...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 255–279.
Published: 01 November 2017
...Susan Ballard Abstract At the turn of the previous century Henri Bergson suggested that sympathy offered a way to understand interspecies relationships. Samuel Butler took Bergson’s ideas to an absurd extent by mixing them with readings of Charles Darwin and claiming a vital impulse for machines...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 93–109.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Deborah Bird Rose Abstract Towards the end of her eventful and productive life, Val Plumwood was turning toward Indigenous people and cultures as a way of encountering the lived experience of ideas she was working with theoretically. At the same time, she was defining herself as a philosophical...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 May 2013
... conditions of visibility and engagement. As a wild avian population, the Lessers are known and managed primarily through practices of asymmetrical intimacy, such as field observation and telemetry. These practices, in turn, determine the emergence of biopower in a specific modality, as a power that takes...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 149–166.
Published: 01 May 2017
... lessness is ontological, pertaining to the realm of being, not doing, less. While Bersani suggests that there can be a happiness “inherent in not being entirely ourselves,” the logic of environmentalism often urges us to be more ourselves (often by doing, consuming, and demanding less ), turning...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 103–121.
Published: 01 May 2012
... diverse ways of relating to poultry and disease vectors point again to the limits of singular, place-based understandings of disease transmission, and reveal the indeterminate, ever-shifting social and political forces at play in shaping risky zoographies. Corresponding to theontological turn” in...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 40–59.
Published: 01 May 2017
... back along Elizabeth Bay Road, I set off for home. That at least was my intention, but on reaching Ithaca Road, on my left, I turned into it and set off downhill to the little waterfront park I had visited so often in 1980. Within a few minutes, I was walking across the lawn to the seawall and leaning...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 171–201.
Published: 01 May 2014
... time in the sixteenth century, noted economist Barbara Ward, co-author with René Dubos of Only One Earth: The Care and Maintenance of a Small Planet, “people had almost literally to turn their minds upside down ... in their passionate resistance to the idea, we can see a terrible sense of vertigo. It...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 447–472.
Published: 01 November 2018
... interest here in critically informing that same environmental project via a route—through the pathways of race historiography—should not be characterized as “all too human,” even as it focuses on an iconic site of human differentiation, that of the human head and brain. Indeed, as it turns out, and as we...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 129–147.
Published: 01 May 2013
... self-serving ontology of the world recoded as “resources,” “natural capital,” and “ecological services,” and question what it is we are salvaging in desiring to sustain the human enterprise. For there is no “human enterprise” worth defending on a planet leveled and revamped to serve the human...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 421–446.
Published: 01 November 2018
... profit in the situated practices of nursery workers and scientists. This article contributes more specifically to the budding “plant turn” in multispecies ethnography by exploring plant-people relations within a corporate setting. 18 I argue that the practices of nursery workers and scientists in...