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sound

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2015) 6 (1): 53–71.
Published: 01 May 2015
... millions of years. The loss of wildness thus elicits a loss of harmony. I consider these Anthropocene interpretations of silence, noise and dissonance by comparing the environmentalist concerns of Krause with responses to the Listening to Birds project—an anthropological investigation of bird sounds...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2024) 16 (1): 230–242.
Published: 01 March 2024
...Dave Wilson Abstract This article reflects on the participation of humans and other species as listening and sounding entities in creating sonic environments. The article offers a preliminary reflexive consideration of the author’s current composition-improvisation project, discussing how...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2016) 8 (2): 196–214.
Published: 01 November 2016
...Max Ritts; John Shiga Abstract Throughout the Cold War, the US Navy aggressively explored the sound-making and sound-detecting capacities of cetaceans to help it retain its supremacy in marine battle space. Whales, dolphins, and porpoises were engaged as animals that “see with sound,” that produce...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2018) 10 (1): 310–329.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Stefan Skrimshire Abstract What is the best way to communicate with far future human (and/or posthuman) societies? This sounds like a question for science fiction, but I ask it in the context of a pressing issue in environmental ethics: the (very) long-term disposal of high-level spent radioactive...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2019) 11 (1): 180–193.
Published: 01 May 2019
..., a massive and still growing hodgepodge of industrial and consumer by-products and emissions; shards of metaphysical ideas and theological dreams; radioactive materials; light, sound, and other modes of sensory pollution; pesticides and herbicides; and so forth. Toxicity targets our bodily tissues, senses...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2019) 11 (2): 302–323.
Published: 01 November 2019
... of transgressive, avant-garde performative and sound poetics—although it escapes such terms, thinking about the bird’s composition in this way compels us into a relation with its territory. © 2019 Stuart Cooke 2019 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons license (CC...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2013) 3 (1): 43–70.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Vicki Powys; Hollis Taylor; Carol Probets Abstract A lyrebird chick was raised in captivity in the 1920s in Australia's New England Tablelands, or so the story goes. The bird mimicked the sounds of the household's flute player, learning two tunes and an ascending scale. When released back...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2014) 4 (1): 41–67.
Published: 01 May 2014
... a benchmark opus for what shadow place composition might sound like in the modern global city. Copyright: © Ryan 2014 2014 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons License (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). This license permits use and distribution of the article for non...
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Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 3. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 4. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 5. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. More
Image
Published: 01 November 2023
Figure 2. Soilkin exercise #2: Observe a stone (2020). Fluxus-inspired instructions as meme, dimensions and media variable. In reference to Milan Knizak, Ceremony , 1977: “5. breaking a stone (to find its soul)”; and Yoko Ono, Stone Piece , 1963: “Take the sound of the stone aging,” both More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2016) 8 (2): 172–195.
Published: 01 November 2016
..., but it is not light, sound or feeling that holds us down. On the contrary, they contrive to sweep us off our feet” (134). 53. Ingold writes, “Rather than thinking of ourselves only as observers, picking our way around the objects about the ground of a ready-formed world, we must imagine ourselves in the first...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2021) 13 (1): 201–223.
Published: 01 May 2021
... “oyster reef” ). Similar descriptions of this listening station and the next appear in Jenkins, “Listening for Coastal Futures.” 18. Helmreich, Sounding the Limits of Life , xxii . 19. Emerson, “Nature,” 6 . 20. Ihde, Listening and Voice , 4–6 ; Lipari, Listening, Thinking...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2022) 14 (3): 571–574.
Published: 01 November 2022
... it an encounter with the ambient. Dissociation inverts the solipsism of selfhood. It is a crack in the partition of the sensible—properly, a disruption of “continuity in subjective experience.” 15 How can we tune into ambience? Like Stevens’s listener, sound studies can lead the way in moving ambience from...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2021) 13 (1): 181–200.
Published: 01 May 2021
... to recognize affinities between the element of water and the fluid boundaries of human and nonhuman life, or between animal bodies and the bodily senses of spectators. They also complicate those affinities by letting sound, image, and text each tell their own story of multispecies existence—sometimes in sync...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2016) 8 (2): 285–290.
Published: 01 November 2016
..., then, Francis sounds a bit less orthodox. His emphasis on interdependence sounds, for instance, less like the fourth-century theologian Augustine of Hippo, who spoke of our creaturely dependence on God as so radical that he bears us up “even down to our grey hairs” 10 and charged that although the breasts...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2014) 4 (1): 1–18.
Published: 01 May 2014
... that is especially pertinent in my reading of its place in the work of a poet so “sound-centred” as Oswald. 13 Recent criticism has emphasised what Tom Bristow has called “a concept of building through sound and listening” in Oswald's poetry; 14 Mary Pinard has described her as the practitioner of an “echo...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2014) 4 (1): 95–112.
Published: 01 May 2014
... of home. Through the printed word, still photographs, moving pictures, and sound, scenic locations and remote landscapes come alive, conveying some form of filtered and mediated experience of the world. You are armchair traveling when you read a Lonely Planet book about some place you may or may...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2021) 13 (1): 264–271.
Published: 01 May 2021
... places, full of the sound and feeling of forces that are beyond our control. Being at the boundary, looking out to sea, gives us the impression of having the measure of ourselves and of where we belong. But I have come to see such impressions are deceptive. Coastlines are also the least static places...
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