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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 53–71.
Published: 01 May 2015
... millions of years. The loss of wildness thus elicits a loss of harmony. I consider these Anthropocene interpretations of silence, noise and dissonance by comparing the environmentalist concerns of Krause with responses to the Listening to Birds project—an anthropological investigation of bird sounds. These...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 196–214.
Published: 01 November 2016
...Max Ritts; John Shiga Abstract Throughout the Cold War, the US Navy aggressively explored the sound-making and sound-detecting capacities of cetaceans to help it retain its supremacy in marine battle space. Whales, dolphins, and porpoises were engaged as animals that “see with sound,” that produce...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 43–70.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Vicki Powys; Hollis Taylor; Carol Probets Abstract A lyrebird chick was raised in captivity in the 1920s in Australia's New England Tablelands, or so the story goes. The bird mimicked the sounds of the household's flute player, learning two tunes and an ascending scale. When released back into the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 41–67.
Published: 01 May 2014
... benchmark opus for what shadow place composition might sound like in the modern global city. Copyright: © Ryan 2014 2014 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons License (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). This license permits use and distribution of the article for non...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 310–329.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Stefan Skrimshire Abstract What is the best way to communicate with far future human (and/or posthuman) societies? This sounds like a question for science fiction, but I ask it in the context of a pressing issue in environmental ethics: the (very) long-term disposal of high-level spent radioactive...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 180–193.
Published: 01 May 2019
..., a massive and still growing hodgepodge of industrial and consumer by-products and emissions; shards of metaphysical ideas and theological dreams; radioactive materials; light, sound, and other modes of sensory pollution; pesticides and herbicides; and so forth. Toxicity targets our bodily tissues...
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 4. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. Figure 4. Ann Lislegaard More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 5. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. Figure 5. Ann Lislegaard More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 3. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. Figure 3. Ann Lislegaard More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 3. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. Figure 3. Ann Lislegaard More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 4. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. Figure 4. Ann Lislegaard More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 5. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. Figure 5. Ann Lislegaard More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 3. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. Figure 3. Ann Lislegaard More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 4. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. Figure 4. Ann Lislegaard More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 5. Ann Lislegaard, Time Machine (2011). Unfolded mirror box, HD video projection, 3-D animation with sound, 5:26 mins. Exhibited Nineteenth Biennale of Sydney (2014) at Carriageworks, Sydney. Reproduced courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. Figure 5. Ann Lislegaard More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 172–195.
Published: 01 November 2016
... shaping a here and now. This particular performance filled the plaza with five rousing “choirs” of woodwinds, brass, strings, and percussion together with the ambient noise of 65th Street and Columbus Avenue and the larger cosmos beyond. Scored to sound the elements of extreme Arctic climes, Sila’ s...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 251–255.
Published: 01 November 2016
... territory of a cry, a signal, a rumor, a stirring, and an alarm—something, in any case, that makes one sit up and that effectively makes one listen to what is coming “from another direction.” By definition, a clamor is an immense warning sound, and one has nothing with which to decode it. A clamor says...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 285–290.
Published: 01 November 2016
... of God and the vertical form of dependence that left creatures in the thrall of this power. In this sense, then, Francis sounds a bit less orthodox. His emphasis on interdependence sounds, for instance, less like the fourth-century theologian Augustine of Hippo, who spoke of our creaturely dependence...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 1–18.
Published: 01 May 2014
... “dispersed outflows and flytipping” indicates, contrasting the pollution of the natural world with the harmonising effects of Oswald's sound world and thus querying the assumption that some forms of matter are abject. As with Halperin, Oswald presents a sensibility in which the boundary between organic and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 95–112.
Published: 01 May 2014
... comforts of home. Through the printed word, still photographs, moving pictures, and sound, scenic locations and remote landscapes come alive, conveying some form of filtered and mediated experience of the world. You are armchair traveling when you read a Lonely Planet book about some place you may or may...