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slow violence

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 1–40.
Published: 01 May 2016
... environmental change that inflict ‘slow violence’ on vulnerable human (and non-human) populations. Nixon argues that a lack of “arresting stories, images and symbols” reduces the visibility of gradual problems such as biodiversity loss, climate change and chemical pollution in cultural imaginations and on...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 86–106.
Published: 01 May 2018
... bodily and environmental malaise exposes the slow violence of war and challenges the liberal idea of war as a temporary event and paroxysm of violence. Taking southern Lebanese accounts seriously reveals how the liberal idea of war keeps Israeli weapons, toxic environments, and embodied pathologies...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 187–212.
Published: 01 May 2018
... becoming as response-ability. © 2018 Manuel Tironi, Myra J. Hird, Cristián Simonetti, Peter Forman, and Nathaniel Freiburger 2018 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). inorganic life Anthropocene slow violence response...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 257–272.
Published: 01 May 2018
... particular—are present in both Gennie’s and Gee’s raps. 31 The integrity of the land is, after all, the integrity of the nation. What we see, then, is a depiction of what Rob Nixon has termed slow violence—harm whose full extent is displaced in time, manifesting itself at temporal scales that fan out...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 273–294.
Published: 01 May 2018
... facility is now being set up to explore energy generation and other possibilities of closer engagement with magma. We take this event as an incitement to explore how the Earth-changing “violence” of volcanic or igneous processes might be seen not simply as happening in time but as both generative and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 18–39.
Published: 01 May 2017
..., and economies. Copyright © 2017 Sarah Besky 2017 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). slow violence shadow place landslides waste human-animal relations hill stations South Asia The town of Darjeeling, in the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 107–128.
Published: 01 May 2018
... seem to change the course of history. I suggest that the intersection of temporal and spatial relationships embedded within the watershed concept reveals the interaction between modernist conceptions of space and time, enabling the persistence of trauma and violence that characterizes modernity. In...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 1–18.
Published: 01 May 2014
... temporal torsions of anthropogenic climate change, in which time and agency are both radically dispersed and decentred. Climate change lacks a centre or moment of origin; it unfolds erratically, in ways that are inconsistently distributed and more often discreet than spectacular (“slow violence” is Rob...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 261–276.
Published: 01 May 2014
... Africa—a tragedy which claimed, in order of magnitude, more lives than Hurricane Sandy, and is just as much a harbinger of what anthropogenic global warming will mean in the twenty-first century. Climate change and the slow but accelerating violence it wreaks are out of sync with the 24-hour media cycle...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 108–136.
Published: 01 May 2019
... based on postcolonial scholar Achille Mbembe’s notion of necropolitics and cultural critic Lauren Berlant’s notion of slow death, developing Foucauldian understandings of biopower. Liver cancer and breast cancer serve as cases showing the operations of an Anthropocene necropolitics, that is, its modes...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 421–446.
Published: 01 November 2018
... loving care contrasts with the violence entailed in seed selection, controlled breeding, and regular culling. Furthermore, tensions arise between breeders and workers on the one hand and corporate “money makers” on the other over seeds as objects of care and sources of value. I demonstrate how seeds...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 213–225.
Published: 01 May 2018
...,” as Henri Lefebvre put it, 33 such that capital comes “dripping from head to toe, from every pore, with blood and dirt.” 34 Rob Nixon has provided a key register through which the environmental humanities have explored such violence: “Slow violence,” in his view, is a “violence of delayed...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 137–151.
Published: 01 May 2019
..., White Innocence . 43. Strathern, Reproducing the Future , 10. 44. Butler, Precarious Life , xii. 45. Mignolo, Idea of Latin America , 74. 46. Nixon, Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor . 47. Mignolo, Idea of Latin America , 62. References...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 147–167.
Published: 01 May 2013
... second line of thought explores how history writing might contribute to an ethical response in the face of the end and an almost inevitable, accompanying violence, anomie and destruction. Apocalyptic language is eschewed by a progress-centred history. Here we argue that it is exactly the proper recovery...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 528–531.
Published: 01 November 2018
.... This work contributes to research on the sociocultural significance of “ruination,” “active debris,” “rogue infrastructure,” and related forms of “slow violence.” 5 Bomb ecologies are a product of slow, ongoing military wasting. The long-term ecological impact of war constitutes a further, implied...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 287–290.
Published: 01 May 2014
... they continue to be held despite what the evidence tells us. 11 Gazing at the broken compels us to cast light on the “shadow places,” to dramatise the “slow violence” of grinding ecological damage. 12 I imagine a community of the broken. Terry Tempest Williams uses the metaphor of the mosaic...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 101–107.
Published: 01 May 2019
... power relations understood as toxic: racism, settler-colonial violence, corporate greed, militarism, and toxic masculinities. The important question is who gets to live, play, thrive, and survive, and who gets to suffer and die from the “slow violence” 7 of toxic compounds and socioeconomic...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 1–17.
Published: 01 May 2017
... largely unintended) presentism that conceptually mirrors the short-termism of the global economy and in so doing renders us insufficiently sensitive to what Nixon has called “slow violence” 11 —that is, the slowly catastrophic unfolding of environmental injury across significantly extended time spans...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 152–173.
Published: 01 May 2019
... what Rob Nixon terms slow violence, a “violence that occurs gradually and out of sight.” 62 The temporality of such violence often operates at odds with the temporal scale or parliamentary terms of party politics. As Nixon argues “casualties from slow violence are” out of sync “with the swift...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 52–71.
Published: 01 May 2019
... corporations, Roy’s essays portray indigenous activists and Naxalite insurgents as “resource rebels.” 17 In using the term resource conflict in a global context to denote native resistance to prolonged low-intensity violence by a nexus of mineral corporations and security forces, I foreground...