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Image
Published: 01 May 2014
Figure 3 Rusty hoppers left on Lartelare's site after the demolition of the CSR Refinery. Schultz made recordings in and around the hoppers. CD booklet image, courtesy Chester Schultz. Figure 3. Rusty hoppers left on Lartelare's site after the demolition of the CSR Refinery. Schultz made More
Image
Published: 01 May 2018
Figure 4. Former site of the Chesapeake Bay Model. An original water meter is in the foreground, and the original water tower can be seen in the distance. Photograph by the author Figure 4. Former site of the Chesapeake Bay Model. An original water meter is in the foreground, and the original More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 131–157.
Published: 01 May 2015
...Jennifer K. Ladino Abstract This essay investigates the natural landscapes and built structures at the Manzanar National Historic Site, the first of ten incarceration camps to open in 1941 and a temporary home for over 11,000 Japanese Americans. Using former incarceree Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston's...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 216–238.
Published: 01 May 2019
... meeting site that helps to problematize the Western pathologization of trans bodies and asks what ethics emerge in this proximity between ticks and trans bodies. Toxicity exists in the discussed works in particular as a complex material-discursive trajectory. Although some discourses on toxicity uphold...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Hugo Reinert Abstract Drawing on a multi-sited study of transnational efforts to safeguard the highly endangered Lesser White-fronted Goose ( Anser Erythropus ), the text develops an argument about a certain “biopolitics of the wild”—a particular mode of governing nonhuman life, rooted in certain...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 18–39.
Published: 01 May 2017
... plantations and bustling tourist town. In many ways, Darjeeling is what Val Plumwood calls a “shadow place.” Shadow places are sites of extraction, invisible to centers of political and economic power yet essential to the global circulation of capital. The existence of shadow places troubles the notion that...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 143–148.
Published: 01 May 2016
... mountain pine beetle beginning in the early 2000s—an infestation caused, in no small part, by what some scientists have called a perfect storm of circumstances created by global warming. For this project, the landscape becomes a site of inscription of forces that operate both above and below human scales...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 77–94.
Published: 01 May 2016
... Hawai‘i, a deeply generative and often fraught field site that has inspired much of our thinking. In addition to these plants, many local people have also been drawn into the absence of ‘alalā. For some (native) Hawaiians, ‘alalā is part of the cultural landscape: these birds hold stories and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 370–396.
Published: 01 November 2018
... produced via the cultural and socioeconomic as well as vegetal relations in which they are entangled. The site of our analysis is an abandoned country estate in western Scotland that has recently undergone R. ponticum removal. By examining the production of visual effects by rhododendrons, cameras, and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 309–324.
Published: 01 November 2017
... tendency to understand our own planet in unfamiliar terms, especially in astrobiology, where so-called analog sites and “extreme environments” provide clues about alien planets. © 2017 Istvan Praet and Juan Francisco Salazar 2017 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 52–71.
Published: 01 May 2019
... spatial practices, such as marches across contested zones and ritual processions to sacred sites. Itineraries of conflict enact a semiotic and political resistance to resource grabs conducted by state agencies and powerful corporations, exemplified by the usurpation of tribal lands rich in iron ore, coal...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 137–151.
Published: 01 May 2019
...Hugo Reinert Abstract Triangulating narratives from a prospective mining site in northern Norway, this article works to identify (and render graspable) a particular effect of retroactive shock—tracing its resonance through experiences of chemical exposure, colonial racism, cultural erasure, and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 152–173.
Published: 01 May 2019
... scales: from the boundedness of a single cell, to a single organism encased in skin, to a body enclosed in a hazmat suit, to architecture and surrounding space, city and hazardous-waste landfill site, contaminated and safe, local and global. Asbestos shows that there is no spatial or temporal “outside...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 194–215.
Published: 01 May 2019
...Miriam Tola Abstract Located in the Prenestino neighborhood of Rome, Italy, the former chemical-textile plant Ex-SNIA Viscosa has been a site of labor exploitation, toxicity, and struggle since the 1920s. Comprising postindustrial ruins, an urban lake, and myriad species, the area has been...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 169–190.
Published: 01 May 2016
... and processes. Canada's North, we argue, is a site where differing cosmologies variously collide, intertwine, operate in parallel, or speak past each other in ways that often marginalize Inuit and other indigenous ways of knowing and being. Inheriting waste is more than just a relay of potentially...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 89–105.
Published: 01 May 2016
... frontier. Next, I consider how Hanford's biological vector control program addresses the spread of radioactive flora and fauna. Looking specifically at one of the site's most notorious offenders (the fruit fly), I discuss how vector control uses instances of nuclear trespass to articulate the boundary...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 171–194.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Jeremy Brice Abstract What place might killing occupy in a more-than-human world, where human life is always-already entangled among nonhumans? In this article I attempt to unsettle the assumption that only individual organisms can be killed, and to render other sites and spaces of killing visible...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 41–67.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Figure 3 Rusty hoppers left on Lartelare's site after the demolition of the CSR Refinery. Schultz made recordings in and around the hoppers. CD booklet image, courtesy Chester Schultz. Figure 3. Rusty hoppers left on Lartelare's site after the demolition of the CSR Refinery. Schultz made...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 57–77.
Published: 01 May 2013
.... Yet they also reveal much about our contemporary relationship to the world's oceans, which remain sites of both enduring wonder and extraordinary exploitation. Copyright: © Hagood 2013 2013 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons License (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 149–171.
Published: 01 November 2016
... argument through engagement with two sites. One concerns the inscription of human activities in volcanic rock, the second the embodiment of isotopes in living beings. These examples raise questions about the multiple scales of geosociality, which intertwine biography and Earth “itself.” Copyright © 2016...