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Image
Published: 01 May 2018
Figure 2. Map of Tierra del Fuego, modified from NordNordWest/Wikipedia. See original map at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tierra_del_Fuego#/media/File:Tierra_del_Fuego_location_map.svg Figure 2. Map of Tierra del Fuego, modified from NordNordWest/Wikipedia. See original map at https More
Image
Published: 01 May 2018
Figure 2. Map of Tierra del Fuego, modified from NordNordWest/Wikipedia. See original map at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tierra_del_Fuego#/media/File:Tierra_del_Fuego_location_map.svg Figure 2. Map of Tierra del Fuego, modified from NordNordWest/Wikipedia. See original map at https More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 257–272.
Published: 01 May 2018
.... We explore how these works domesticate deep time, nesting personal histories within the temporal depth of the landscape and crosshatching biographical, mythological, and geologic understandings of time. Yet we then see how this domestication comes to be threatened by developments that sever the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 149–155.
Published: 01 May 2013
... ways of being. This model allows us to see how we might aim towards unity in opposition rather than a fusion of the two cultures. On this basis I make some proposals concerning the long-term and more immediate institutional and pedagogical consequences of this view and reflect upon the challenges...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 107–127.
Published: 01 May 2016
... process only the potential to meet preexisting human desires. I argue for expanding the logic of “information problems” to consider how affects as well as information flow alongside materialities in cycles of production and consumption. Rather than seeing consumer “preferences” as desires inherent in...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 57–77.
Published: 01 May 2013
... expressed the “sense of wonder” that was critical to Carson's ecological aesthetic, I argue, they also subsumed the new “frontier” of the world's oceans into the technological imperialism of the post-World War II United States. As new technologies allowed military and scientific researchers to see deeper...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 196–214.
Published: 01 November 2016
...Max Ritts; John Shiga Abstract Throughout the Cold War, the US Navy aggressively explored the sound-making and sound-detecting capacities of cetaceans to help it retain its supremacy in marine battle space. Whales, dolphins, and porpoises were engaged as animals that “see with sound,” that produce...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 447–472.
Published: 01 November 2018
.... More precisely, it was as human cultural differences were correlated with variations in the size and shape of the head that the human body, in its upright stature, came to provide an explicitly materialist—and, as we shall see, potently ethnocentric—foundation for the claim that human beings are...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 27–51.
Published: 01 May 2019
..., and political contexts that infuse them with meaning. In interpreting these meanings, I argue that a more inclusive socio-ecological politics requires visual strategies that resist racialized ways of seeing while making visible the injustice of disproportionate environmental impacts on low-income...
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 2. Jerusalem artichoke in human vision (left), simulated butterfly vision (middle), and simulated bee vision (right), photographed by Klaus Schmitt. Both butterflies and bees can see into the near-ultraviolet (UV-A). Used with permission. Figure 2. Jerusalem artichoke in human vision More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 2. Jerusalem artichoke in human vision (left), simulated butterfly vision (middle), and simulated bee vision (right), photographed by Klaus Schmitt. Both butterflies and bees can see into the near-ultraviolet (UV-A). Used with permission. Figure 2. Jerusalem artichoke in human vision More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 2. Jerusalem artichoke in human vision (left), simulated butterfly vision (middle), and simulated bee vision (right), photographed by Klaus Schmitt. Both butterflies and bees can see into the near-ultraviolet (UV-A). Used with permission. Figure 2. Jerusalem artichoke in human vision More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 456–459.
Published: 01 November 2017
..., Essentials of Conservation Biology . 2. The debate among conservation biologists around “nonnative species” and “invasive species” (not the same, but often elided) is becoming increasingly agitated in recent years. See, e.g., Davis et al., “Don’t Judge Species” and the responses. 3. Crooks and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 259–263.
Published: 01 May 2016
...). For a thoughtful critique of CITES, see Jon Hutton, Barnabas Dickson, eds., Endangered Species, Threatened Convention: The Past, Present and Future of CITES (London: Earthscan, 2000): the concept of species and its implications goes unquestioned, however. 5 On the CITES appendices, see...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 213–220.
Published: 01 May 2014
... see increased focus in three overlapping areas: ( a ) holistic critical theory, specifically the union of natural and cultural “critical heritage studies” 8 ; ( b ) critical pedagogy, particularly the merging of natural and cultural heritage pedagogies, including efforts toward recognizing...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 359–377.
Published: 01 November 2017
... for the biologic organism in the bioregenerative [life-support] system.” 24 9. Star, “Power, Technology, and the Phenomenology of Conventions,” as quoted by Hustak and Myers, “Involutionary Momentum.” See also Masco, “End of Ends.” 10. As Roger Launius points out, outer space’s status...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 300–308.
Published: 01 November 2017
... that angle in his afterword to Maruyama and Harkins’s 1975 Cultures beyond Earth . For still earlier data points on the convergence of anthropology and search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI), see Steven J. Dick’s 2012 “The Role of Anthropology in SETI: A Historical View,” which reports on...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 52–71.
Published: 01 May 2019
..., pointing down so that all I can see in its circle of light are Comrade Kamla’s bare heels in her scuffed, black chappals. . . . It turns out to be a long walk.” 25 Referring to the group collectively as “we,” Roy tries to accommodate the troop’s point of view into her own narrative of the journey. At...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 242–246.
Published: 01 May 2019
... Discourses of environment, disability, and cure—to return to Clare— illuminate the way normative culture approaches ravaged environments through binaries of cure and abandonment. Additionally, Clare’s work helps us see how ableist notions of disability—as an aberrant condition—have spread to dominant values...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 57–76.
Published: 01 May 2016
... the twentieth century saw dramatic declines in helminth biodiversity. The extinction of hosts sees the extinction of parasites and symbionts, and there has been little interest in parasites in wildlife conservation, captive animal management, and species reintroduction projects. 74 Meanwhile the...