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science

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Published: 01 May 2015
Figure 2. A close-up of organisms on the dock. Photo: Hatfield Marine Science Center, Oregon State University. Figure 2. A close-up of organisms on the dock. Photo: Hatfield Marine Science Center, Oregon State University. More
Image
Published: 01 May 2015
Figure 3. A Japanese shore crab removed from the dock. Photo: Hatfield Marine Science Center, Oregon State University. Figure 3. A Japanese shore crab removed from the dock. Photo: Hatfield Marine Science Center, Oregon State University. More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 349–369.
Published: 01 November 2018
... other: each includes the other, as it were fractally, all the way down. 4 A similar argument applies to a simpleminded distinction between “indigenous knowledge” and “science,” which has been pungently criticized by, for instance, Arun Agrawal, who observes that there is no single scientific method...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 203–216.
Published: 01 May 2014
... generic science fiction protagonists. 12 Heise calls for stylistic and formal innovation while also suggesting that the Modernist tradition of narrative collage offers possibilities for capturing the vast dimensions of global ecological transformations. 13 Pendell's The Great Bay certainly...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 1–40.
Published: 01 May 2016
... complicated and multifaceted environmental phenomena can be reduced to fast, simple, evocative, invasive narratives that percolate through science, legislation, policy and civic action, and to examine how these narratives can drown out rather than open up possibilities for novel social-ecological engagements...
Image
Published: 01 May 2018
Figure 4. Brussels great auk specimen, Institut royal des sciences naturelles de Belgique, Brussels, 2016. Photograph by the author Figure 4. Brussels great auk specimen, Institut royal des sciences naturelles de Belgique, Brussels, 2016. Photograph by the author More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 309–324.
Published: 01 November 2017
...Istvan Praet; Juan Francisco Salazar Abstract A growing number of researchers in the social sciences and the environmental humanities have begun to focus on the wider universe and how it is apprehended by modern cosmology. Today the extraterrestrial has become part of the remit of anthropologists...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 149–155.
Published: 01 May 2013
... sciences. I offer a different model, inspired by the Heraclitean notion of unity in opposition, which conceives the task of the arts as the common articulation of our myriad ways of being in the world and the task of the various sciences as the exploration of the world that is manifest in and through those...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 233–260.
Published: 01 May 2014
... environmental humanists at a distance from those geoscientists currently trying to popularise the Anthropocene proposition and a set of related grand ideas (like “planetary boundaries”). This is unfortunate because geoscience—like other branches of science—tends to enjoy a higher profile in key decision-making...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 397–420.
Published: 01 November 2018
... technocrats, and development-science professionals in Angola, comes equipped with a sense of morality associated with the delocalizing of knowledge and governance of local forests. One crucial question emerges: what sort of forest-ecological knowledges are deemed politically, developmentally, and ethically...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 473–500.
Published: 01 November 2018
... fiction” on its readers is a hazardous enterprise, since this category includes a range of styles and genres. These nineteen works include the following genres (at least): realist literature, young adult fiction, noir, thriller, satire, postapocalyptic fiction, science fiction, speculative fiction, and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 501–527.
Published: 01 November 2018
... androcentrism were foregrounded as well. Another way feminism is sidestepped in many of these field-defining texts is by highlighting how the humanities adds value to the natural or “hard” sciences. We see this, for example, in David E. Nye and colleagues’ “The Emergence of the Environmental Humanities”; in...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 310–329.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Stefan Skrimshire Abstract What is the best way to communicate with far future human (and/or posthuman) societies? This sounds like a question for science fiction, but I ask it in the context of a pressing issue in environmental ethics: the (very) long-term disposal of high-level spent radioactive...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 40–62.
Published: 01 May 2018
...—a platform for infinitely flexible future developments. 2 Bioengineered yeast foods are an imagined future of the past and a speculative future of the present, but also a present and developing reality. In both science-fictional and scientific discourses such future and futuristic foods are...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 150–170.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Figure 4. Brussels great auk specimen, Institut royal des sciences naturelles de Belgique, Brussels, 2016. Photograph by the author Figure 4. Brussels great auk specimen, Institut royal des sciences naturelles de Belgique, Brussels, 2016. Photograph by the author ...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 129–149.
Published: 01 May 2018
... condition of creativity, open up new modes of receptivity and responsiveness to species extinctions? This essay turns to philosophies of becoming and to recent research in the biological sciences to explore this possibility. I suggest that attending to the heterogeneity of experience alerts us to more...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 213–225.
Published: 01 May 2018
... frames, which stretch over millennia or more. Of course, until recently it could perhaps have been argued that such frames were not actually relevant to humanities researchers. But one of the secular authorities of modernity—science—has revealed, through its reality-making regimes, a profound moment of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 359–377.
Published: 01 November 2017
... Commons license (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). space science history of technology multispecies maintenance Spaceship Earth algae Perfect smoothness is only possible in idealizations, while the rough and the real converge. —Peter Sloterdijk, Globes The American astronaut in the 1960s was the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 433–453.
Published: 01 November 2017
... “intelligence,” “technology,” and “civilization”? What makes them possible, and how do they evolve? The present examination aims to arrive at a more well-founded search for extraterrestrial intelligence that takes into account current research within cognitive science, the history of technology, and the history...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 378–397.
Published: 01 November 2017
... each other—such as solar physics, atmospheric science, dermatology, and ophthalmology (eye biology)—in remarkable ways. And even though these links may cast new light on the question of extraterrestrial life, they are an interesting topic of study in their own right. The present study illustrates this...