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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 203–216.
Published: 01 May 2014
... grave reminder not only of the incalculable risks of the Anthropocene, but also of the basic tenets of realist storytelling. Copyright: © von Mossner 2014 2014 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons License (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). This license permits use and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 103–121.
Published: 01 May 2012
... intervention in Việt Nam to explore how avian influenza threats challenge long-held understandings of animals' place in the environment and society. In this intervention, poultry farmers collaborated with health workers to illustrate maps of avian flu risks in their communities. Participant-observation of the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 418–432.
Published: 01 November 2017
...Jessica O’reilly Abstract From a distance, Antarctica invokes extreme imaginaries and possibilities. In the practice of everyday human Antarctic life, however, daily tasks and risks are heavily managed, mitigated, and overseen. To analyze the spectacular and mundane natures of human life in...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 149–170.
Published: 01 May 2014
... to be drawn are less about solving bee decline and more about how becoming less uncomfortable with vulnerability and seeking to put ourselves at risk to others becomes an ethical practice. The example of these alternative beekeepers suggests that we might learn to accept more generously the risks of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 123–140.
Published: 01 May 2012
... placed affect at the very centre of contemporary narratives that call for pro-environmental beliefs and behaviours. A critical public-feelings framework is used to explore these issues and trace their passage from the private and intimate, where they risk remaining denuded of agency, and into the public...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 101–123.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Jonas Anshelm; Anders Hansson Abstract Geoengineering, i.e., the deliberate manipulation of the global climate using grand-scale technologies, poses new challenges in terms of environmental risks and human–nature relationships. Until recently, these technologies were considered science fiction, but...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 273–294.
Published: 01 May 2018
..., we circle back on the Krafla project to consider questions of risk, uncertainty, and responsibility that attend the potential new interface with the underworld of magma. © 2018 Nigel Clark, Alexandra Gormally, and Hugh Tuffen 2018 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 133–150.
Published: 01 May 2016
... presence of others” as a way of producing a “common account” of the world. 10 This necessarily means putting preconceived ideas of our place in the world at risk. It means risking rethinking dominant notions about nature and our own fraught relationship to the world. “Collective thinking in the presence...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 101–116.
Published: 01 May 2013
... watching they would have witnessed two scientists in a verbal jostle about the calculated risks of using synthetic chemicals: first, Rachel Carson, shown in a long dress, bird-watching through the coastal woods of Maine, looking up and down, walking through light and shadow with one hand in her jacket...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 May 2013
..., through sheer impact. Birds are delicate creatures, with hollow bones: however careful the calculations, however swiftly birders rush to the impact site to begin disentangling the trapped birds, there is still always a risk. Wings can get caught at odd angles in the impacting mesh, bones snap in the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 149–153.
Published: 01 May 2014
... von Mossner's essay on science fiction and the risks of the Anthropocene discusses Dale Pendell's novel The Great Bay (2010), which features the future history of a flooded California after the Collapse in 2021 as a result of human activity on the Earth. Taking her cue from Ulrich Beck's work on the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 287–290.
Published: 01 May 2014
... narrative arc. Perhaps it is more inclusive to allow for a range of complex outcomes for different animals, plants, and ecosystems. When we smooth out the wrinkles, when we leave people feeling comfortable, when we strive for the transcendental, we risk losing—writes Maria Tumarkin—the “friction-and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 343–347.
Published: 01 May 2018
... encountering. There is much more to be said about the synergies of multisensorial work in this waymaker. Touch, gestural nuances, wafts of warming dune aromas collaborate with listening as well as the watch of witness. When we wit(h)ness, we risk being affected—a-bodily moved, grown more capacious or stilled...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 152–173.
Published: 01 May 2019
... exposure, and therefore associated health complications, are unevenly distributed, with workers at asbestos mines, refineries, and now abatement and removal industries being most at risk. The first cases of asbestos-related deaths in asbestos processing factories were documented in the nineteenth century...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 213–220.
Published: 01 May 2014
... increasingly exist today in a paradoxical state of conflict or tension. Indeed, it is under these tenuous circumstances and in this harsh light—what Ulrich Beck calls “world risk society” 4 —that the Environmental Humanities becomes necessarily “an effort to inhabit the difficult space of simultaneous...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 101–107.
Published: 01 May 2019
... which the perceived feminization of nature, with castrating chemicals, low sperm counts, and reproductive and genital neoformations, is presented as the ultimate risk scenario of much antitoxic discourses. Such antitoxic discourse gets infused with a “polluted politics” 6 and “toxic sexism” where...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 1–40.
Published: 01 May 2016
... distribution of risks and vulnerabilities. For Nixon it is imperative that the environmental humanities address the skewed relationship between widespread modes of environmental communication, such as news headlines and political rhetoric, and slow and incremental forms of environmental harm. A key challenge...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 233–260.
Published: 01 May 2014
... many years to discredit his Gaia hypothesis). They also (so far) avoid the rhetorical excesses of some of their predecessors and are thus less likely to be seen as what Roger Pielke called “issue advocates”—that is, researchers who try to scientise their political preferences and so risk politicising...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 226–240.
Published: 01 May 2018
... merciless. And in its wake, the community was incredulous, traumatized, and, perhaps counterintuitively, enchanted. Research initiated in the years following the fire has tracked two primary themes: the complex science of large-scale fire events (including risk mitigation) and the human story of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 183–186.
Published: 01 May 2015
... Kosofsky Sedgwick here: “In dealing with an open-secret structure, it's only by being shameless about risking the obvious that we happen into the vicinity of the transformative.” ( Epistemology of the Closet: Updated with a New Preface (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2008), 22.) It could be...