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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 57–68.
Published: 01 May 2012
... essayistic form of narration to pull together contrasting examples that suggest hard and fast distinctions between subject and object tend to provoke misleadingly abstract descriptions of place. The specific place under investigation is a farming property in rural New South Wales. It has played a significant...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 107–127.
Published: 01 May 2016
... individuals, I claim we should understand affects—including different modes of acquisitiveness as well as ecological and social sensibilities—as the emergent properties of specific assemblages of humans and non-humans that comprise and perform processes of production, distribution, and consumption. To help...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 41–58.
Published: 01 May 2016
...Matthew MacLellan Abstract This article argues that Garrett Hardin's primary object of critique in his influential “The Tragedy of the Commons” is not the commons or shared property at all—as is almost universally assumed by Hardin's critics—but is rather Adam Smith's theory of markets and its...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 194–215.
Published: 01 May 2019
... points to the transformation of dominant regimes of property and governance, while also challenging approaches to the commons that rely on the distinction between active human collectives and malleable resources. © 2019 Miriam Tola 2019 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a...
Image
Published: 01 May 2014
Figure 5 “The Coastline Paradox.” This image from Mandelbrot's 1967 paper models the coastline paradox: the property that the measured length of a stretch of a deeply indented coastline like Great Britain's depends on the scale of measurement. Smaller scales reveal new details, down to the More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 270–276.
Published: 01 November 2016
... keep one’s dependence in proportion. This forms the basis for some radical teaching on private property: there is always a set of unseen bonds of dependence and thus a set of obligations, or a social mortgage, on private property. The principle of the subordination of private property to the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 295–300.
Published: 01 May 2014
... hermit crabs, she exposed herself to these vulnerabilities, as well as to the toxic properties of oil itself, as she watched entire ecological communities die. Bishop began working with the uneasy alchemy of the pharmakon, thinking about how to transform poisonous oil into a cure. Classically, the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 141–154.
Published: 01 May 2012
... engender forms of identification and companionship that contrast to hyper-domestication and private property as we know it. You who search for a world of mutually-flourishing companions, consider mushrooms. Mushrooms are well known as companions. The concept of ‘symbiosis'—mutually beneficial...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 195–205.
Published: 01 May 2014
..., bubbling in and out of sensibility. So first, what configures the character and intensities of awkwardness in creatures and their human relations? In previous writings I have developed the concept of ‘nonhuman charisma’—the properties of an organism that distinguish it to human perception. I understand...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 152–173.
Published: 01 May 2019
... object of study, unlike optical microscopes that use light that reflects back off the outer boundary of the object of study. From these properties I begin to theorize asbestos as triggering an understanding of the porousness of the boundaries of inside and outside, crucial for thinking the embodied and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 227–232.
Published: 01 May 2016
... someone's property, but we do not thank modernity for this. Instead, we are thankful for the incredibly hard battles fought by women (and their allies) to be recognized as persons rather than property. Moreover, we cannot forget the reminders offered by Silvia Federici, Arlie Russell Hochschild, and other...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 245–250.
Published: 01 November 2016
... St Francis did with the wild animals in the woods?” 5 But those more attuned to the operative legacy of religious discourse and practice continue to trawl the Franciscan archive for genuinely political potential, opposing poverty, the common, and interdependence to consumerism, property, and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 167–170.
Published: 01 May 2017
... passion, the concupiscence, the hook, of having and had . This philosophy would have forced us never to confess our attachment to the things capable of giving us properties that we didn’t know we had.” 5 Instead of asking, “What is it?” we could try, “What has it got going for it?”—a question that...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 20–39.
Published: 01 May 2018
... entanglement of cereals, fungi, and humans, traces the slow development of a rhizomatic “empire” of domestication and property regimes that thrive by sequestering intimate affection from economic rationality: an empire centered around the family home, where “humans have curled up in their armchairs with their...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 171–174.
Published: 01 May 2017
... measures promulgated in other polities: in the United Kingdom, the discovery of Japanese knotweed on a property may reduce its assessed value, and in parts of Australia it is formally prohibited. 1 It is hard to think of anything good about “invasion.” As the Oxford English Dictionary ( OED...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 180–193.
Published: 01 May 2019
... of numbers purporting to express lawful relations among properties. In the role of the principal tools for understanding reality, numbers are piled “in this heap,” in diesem Haufen , to which they reduce the reality in question ( PhG sec. 290). At issue is not quantity as such, but the concept-free...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 43–70.
Published: 01 May 2013
..., Martha purchased a reel-to-reel tape recorder and taped her low, matter-of-fact voice, describing her arrival at Allanbank when she was 29: In 1936 I first went to the Allan's Water district, and later we purchased a property there known as Allanbank. It was on Allanbank I first heard the lyrebird...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 69–84.
Published: 01 May 2012
... study of private sector, NGOs and local government working together for nature conservation in ‘PPPs', that is public-private partnerships. 2 Ethabuka and Cravens Peak, former pastoral properties bordering the Simpson desert, are two of the largest reserves purchased and managed by the NGO Bush...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 215–234.
Published: 01 November 2016
... new mathematics shows how relatively simple elements may, under the right circumstances, form complex systems that harness iterative feedback to assemble and repair themselves, adapt to changing circumstances, and manifest emergent properties. 33 Such systems include planets, living cells, galaxies...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 235–239.
Published: 01 November 2016
... . Rogers Richard . Towards an Urban Renaissance . London : Spon , 1999 . Safransky Sara . “ Greening the Urban Frontier: Race, Property, and Resettlement in Detroit .” Geoforum 56 ( 2014 ): 237 – 48 . Tsing Anna Lowenhaupt . The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the...