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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 107–127.
Published: 01 May 2016
...Jake P. Greear Abstract In this paper I examine the contemporary trend toward de-industrialized and decentralized production with a view to its implications for ecological sustainability. Specifically, I suggest we can understand the potential positive ecological implications of such trends by...
Image
Published: 01 May 2019
Figure 1. Can writing function as a productive hormone disruptor within larger cultural narrative sequences? This is my urine. Its metabolites are messages. Figure 1. Can writing function as a productive hormone disruptor within larger cultural narrative sequences? This is my urine. Its More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 108–128.
Published: 01 May 2017
... which life is associated with disruption, pathology, and chaos, while that part of the animal that remains productive comes to be viewed as determined, machinelike, and anthropogenic. In this essay, I focus on the way that life is counted upon to exceed . Industrial animal husbandry depends upon...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 73–102.
Published: 01 May 2015
...-case basis. This paper considers the epistemological implications of the digitisation of the Directors' Correspondence (DC) collection (1841-1928) at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, made available through the Global Plants database. In order to avoid a polarised analysis of the end-products of archive...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 89–105.
Published: 01 May 2016
...Shannon Cram Abstract Nuclear weapons production has created a unique geography of irradiated open space in the United States. In recent years, many of these landscapes have been re-classified as national wildlife refuges in an attempt to transform the nation's atomic sacrifice zones into spaces of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 370–396.
Published: 01 November 2018
... though the methods employed can be destructive and long-term success is often limited. Building on recent work critiquing categorical approaches to invasive species management, we argue that such campaigns obscure not only the underlying conditions but also the ongoing production of plant invasiveness...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 40–62.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Erika Amethyst Szymanski Abstract Humans and yeast have a long history of productive collaboration in making a global array of fermented foodstuffs including wine, bread, and beer. Synthetic biology is now changing the shape of human-yeast work. The Sc2.0, or “synthetic yeast,” project aims to...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 213–225.
Published: 01 May 2018
..., we suggest, engage with the productive ways in which deep time reworks questions of narrative, self, and representation. In addressing these dynamics, this introduction and the accompanying articles place current concerns into the larger flows of planetary temporalities, revealing deep time as...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 103–121.
Published: 01 May 2012
... interspecies relationships, which in turn shape the location of disease risks in space. I develop the term risky zoographies to signal the emergence of competing descriptions of animals and their habitats in zoonotic disease contexts. This concept suggests that as wild animals, livestock products, and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 93–109.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Deborah Bird Rose Abstract Towards the end of her eventful and productive life, Val Plumwood was turning toward Indigenous people and cultures as a way of encountering the lived experience of ideas she was working with theoretically. At the same time, she was defining herself as a philosophical...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 217–232.
Published: 01 May 2014
... connections. Exploring a multiplicity of cultural techniques and actors, human as well as non-human, involved in the production of the image of the globe, this atlas becomes a medium of “being in the world” rather than one of “looking at” it. Being in the world is also the attempt of another photographic...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 125–148.
Published: 01 May 2014
... and comfortable ‘democratic collective’ (Latour 2004) to a messy, yet constantly productive and on-going coexistence. Copyright: © Abrahamsson and Bertoni 2014 2014 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons License (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). This license permits use...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 129–148.
Published: 01 May 2017
... inescapably androgenic terms. An ecologically directed evaluation of biopoetry ultimately affirms the indebtedness of all literary production, including biopoetry, to other-than-human lives and bodies. Copyright © 2017 John Charles Ryan 2017 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 37–56.
Published: 01 May 2016
..., and ethnography. Like queer enactments of gender, performative experiments exhibit the performativity of conventional science and thereby make scientific modes of knowledge production and claims available for critical inspection. Moving beyond the domain of human self-fashioning and debates about the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 180–193.
Published: 01 May 2019
..., a massive and still growing hodgepodge of industrial and consumer by-products and emissions; shards of metaphysical ideas and theological dreams; radioactive materials; light, sound, and other modes of sensory pollution; pesticides and herbicides; and so forth. Toxicity targets our bodily tissues...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 194–215.
Published: 01 May 2019
..., interviews with activists, and sustained attention to the human and nonhuman entities that make up the area, the essay argues that the intimacy with past contestations of labor toxicity is key in the production of the Ex-SNIA as a commons. What has been emerging in Rome, is a cosmopolitical commons that...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 174–179.
Published: 01 May 2019
...Figure 1. Can writing function as a productive hormone disruptor within larger cultural narrative sequences? This is my urine. Its metabolites are messages. Figure 1. Can writing function as a productive hormone disruptor within larger cultural narrative sequences? This is my urine. Its...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 265–270.
Published: 01 May 2016
.... To lay bare the spatial politics at work, one must begin to ‘story’ places differently. 22 There are encounters of passion, and encounters of pain. Capitalism too emerges through encounters, between labourers torn from their means of production and the owners of money. This was Marx's thesis...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 270–276.
Published: 01 November 2016
... view the world in a purely utilitarian way, as though individual benefit through improvements in efficiency and productivity is all that matters. One might remark that to be a “rational actor” here is no longer to be oriented purely to the end of maximizing self-interest; to be truly rational is to...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 245–254.
Published: 01 May 2016
... transformed. An Ecomodernist Manifesto 's ardent recommendations on some of the most salient ecological and social quandaries we face are motivated by a future world of “vastly improved material well-being, public health, resource productivity, economic integration, shared infrastructure, and personal...