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ocean

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Published: 01 May 2016
Figure 8. Bonnie Monteleone, Plastic Ocean: In Honor of Captain Charles Moore, from the What Goes Around Comes Around collection, 2011, trash. Copyright Bonnie Monteleone. Reproduced with Permission. Figure 8. Bonnie Monteleone, Plastic Ocean: In Honor of Captain Charles Moore, from the More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 57–77.
Published: 01 May 2013
... on the natural history of the oceans, which helped establish her as a talented and trustworthy translator of scientific concepts into literary prose. This essay builds upon that idea, showing how Carson's The Sea Around Us (1951) and The Edge of the Sea (1955) not only shaped public understandings of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 196–214.
Published: 01 November 2016
... sophisticated echolocation “clicks,” and that harness the ocean’s complex acoustic waveguide to detect signals thousands of miles away. Other scholars have touched on the navy’s legacy in cetology (whale science), but none have made it their object of study. Our article places this relationship at the center of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 169–190.
Published: 01 May 2016
...Alexander R. D. Zahara; Myra J. Hird Abstract As capitalism's unintended, and often unacknowledged, fallout, humans have developed sophisticated technologies to squirrel away our discards: waste is buried, burned, gasified, thrown into the ocean, and otherwise kept out-of-sight and out-of-mind...
Image
Published: 01 May 2016
Figure 7. Chris Jordan, Gyre, 2009. Depicts 2.4 million pieces of plastic, equal to the estimated number of pounds of plastic pollution that enter the world's oceans every hour. All of the plastic in this image was collected from the Pacific Ocean. Copyright Chris Jordan. Reproduced with More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 203–217.
Published: 01 May 2016
...Figure 8. Bonnie Monteleone, Plastic Ocean: In Honor of Captain Charles Moore, from the What Goes Around Comes Around collection, 2011, trash. Copyright Bonnie Monteleone. Reproduced with Permission. Figure 8. Bonnie Monteleone, Plastic Ocean: In Honor of Captain Charles Moore, from the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 398–417.
Published: 01 November 2017
... unique environments. By some estimates, biodiversity on Antarctic continental shelves exceeds that of comparable habitats in the Arctic and, in some cases, is as rich as other ocean habitats on the planet, except for coral reefs. 22 In some cases, biodiversity in sub-Antarctic islands possibly exceeds...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 171–174.
Published: 01 May 2017
... and Invasive Species . For examples of the Indian Ocean’s ecological influence on Australia, see Rangan and Kull, “Indian Ocean.” References Benson Etienne . “ The Urbanization of the Eastern Gray Squirrel in the United States .” Journal of American History 100 ( 2013 ): 691 – 710...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 85–102.
Published: 01 May 2012
... the Anthropocene. “El Niño Orgonon” uses another form of “geological syntax,” casting the ocean in an agential role in relation to language and climate change: “the ocean has decided to rearrange / its syntax” (4). The horizon of the visible and thinkable world, in this poem, is produced in a...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 245–254.
Published: 01 May 2016
... and domestic animals, while the once enormous abundance of living beings in the ocean is gone—and who remembers? 16 What makes it true is that the great animal migrations are disappearing, wild animal populations are plummeting, and so many beings (wild and domestic) are deprived of the freedom to...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 167–170.
Published: 01 May 2017
... described, extending to the environment that supports the little crab (it needs to have an ocean temperature within a certain range), our practice becomes less classificatory and more one that follows the struggles of an animal avid for its survival, grasping one thing, scuttling away from another. An...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 217–232.
Published: 01 May 2014
... London's Natural History Museum and a monumental book edition completed “an epic eight-year expedition,” undertaken by Brazilian photographer Sebastião Salgado, “to rediscover the mountains, deserts and oceans, the animals and peoples that have so far escaped the imprint of modern society—the land and life...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 309–324.
Published: 01 November 2017
... “seeing,” imagining and sensing the Antarctic continent and Southern Ocean. 18 Battaglia and her colleagues plead for “a space-inclusive anthropology” that does not assume that the relationship between the social and the ecological ends at our planet’s upper atmosphere because it is a “natural...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 287–290.
Published: 01 May 2014
... into rivers, estuaries and oceans creating vast “dead zones.” 3 I probably don't need to tell you all this. I don't need to tell you that the way we eat has played a leading role in plunging the earth into another mass extinction event. I don't need to tell you that we participate in an unfair...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 180–193.
Published: 01 May 2019
... The global dump is a desert extending on land and in the hypoxic zones of the oceans. The more of it there is, the more it grows—mimicking the activity of what the Greeks called phusis and the Latins knew as natura —the fewer are the opportunities for future flourishing and finite growth. The...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 213–220.
Published: 01 May 2014
... Theodor W. Dialectics of Enlightenment . Translated by Cumming John . New York : Continuum , 1987 . Jackson Jeremy B. C. , Alexander Karen E. , and Sala Enric , eds. Shifting Baselines: The Past and the Future of Ocean Fisheries . Washington, Covelo, and London...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 149–171.
Published: 01 November 2016
..., coordination, and employment of the pipes (first steel and aluminum and, later, plastic) was a major engineering feat, mainly the responsibility of Jónsson. After weeks of intensive pumping and the movement of pipes and people back and forth, the lava flowed eastward, away from the harbor and into the ocean...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 77–94.
Published: 01 May 2016
..., interestingly, compellingly, a seal arrives. The arrival feels like a message from the deep, a statement of vulnerability brought onto land by those who live in the ocean but also need to haul out. In these times of extinction and extermination, this moment is a fissure, a happening that becomes a recursive...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 359–377.
Published: 01 November 2017
... aimed to secure new geographies of human existence: by supplying breathable oxygen and decomposing human waste, algae might impel sojourns to otherwise-unwelcoming places like the deepest trenches of the ocean or the outer bounds of the atmosphere. Thus, alongside these mid-century, large-scale...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 171–201.
Published: 01 May 2014
... projection: Africa, once regarded as the dark continent but revealed by Louis and Mary Leakey as the “birthplace of humanity” in 1959, the southern oceans, and a part of Antarctica. Freed from such Western distortions and the coordinating systems of the graticule, the earth appeared “at liberty to clothe...