1-20 of 22 Search Results for

nuclear waste

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2016) 7 (1): 89–105.
Published: 01 May 2016
... does this constitutive contradiction do? In this article, I explore the slippery subjectivities of nuclear waste and nature at Washington State's Hanford Nuclear Reservation. Beginning with the Hanford Reach National Monument, I examine how this space is framed as both pristine habitat and waste...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2019) 11 (2): 280–301.
Published: 01 November 2019
... power and reprocessing plant at Sellafield in 1947. By following the “flows” of pleasure, emotion, energy, and waste through Seascale, we explore the legacies of nuclear contamination for coastal communities, within a broader regime of the commodification of nature. This essay emerges from a...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2018) 10 (1): 310–329.
Published: 01 May 2018
... modernity. © 2018 Stefan Skrimshire 2018 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). deep time nuclear waste confession Saint Augustine Derrida “For the last time, (Man) assigns himself the main role, even if it’s...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2019) 11 (1): 152–173.
Published: 01 May 2019
...Sasha Litvintseva Abstract Asbestos is a fibrous mineral. Airborne asbestos—similar to nuclear radiation and chemical atmospheric pollutants—is invisible to the naked eye, and living and breathing alongside it has deferred toxic effects on human bodies. The toxicity of asbestos operates by...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2018) 10 (2): 528–531.
Published: 01 November 2018
... clearance operators and development organizations that select these massively contaminated villages for intervention. Researching a similar mix of ecological and geopolitical intervention, Masco analyzed how military waste produced “mutant ecologies” in post–Cold War New Mexico. 2 Nuclear radiation has...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2013) 2 (1): 57–77.
Published: 01 May 2013
... disposal of nuclear waste, which was conventionally packaged in drums, then dropped on the sea floor. Through the process of bioaccumulation residues of this waste were building up in the bodies of highly mobile marine animals. 56 “What happens then,” her preface asks, “to the careful calculation of a...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2017) 9 (2): 359–377.
Published: 01 November 2017
.... My focus here is on the life-support system, the technological system that furnished human space cabin passengers with all their vital needs: breathable oxygen, nutrient stores, and waste removal. I zero in on the history of one type of technology in particular, the bioregenerative life-support...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2014) 4 (1): 19–39.
Published: 01 May 2014
... women's pumps floating, followed by furniture. That morning, the residents of Kingston, Tennessee, awoke to the reality that the central infrastructural element of the entire town, the Steam Plant, had spilled over 1.1 billion gallons of coal ash waste out of an earthen holding pond and into the river...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2014) 4 (1): 1–18.
Published: 01 May 2014
... ... [We] visualize “the geologic” as interwoven with the rise in global populations; nested within the challenges of nuclear waste storage; enfolded in carbon emissions; caught up in the rise of tsunami waves; orbiting the planet as space trash; stuck in the stagnant centre of the vortex that is the Great...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2016) 7 (1): 245–254.
Published: 01 May 2016
... Manifesto pursuing technological developments that are greener and more efficient in material throughput, energy requirements, and waste output is pressing. But changing economic structures and consumer behaviors regarding the production and consumption of materials, food, and energy is not at all necessary...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2018) 10 (1): 213–225.
Published: 01 May 2018
... contemplate in full and at length the Anthropocene’s losses and disturbances. Stefan Skrimshire’s piece brings these concerns together. In a reading of the nuclear semiotics of deep-earth radioactive waste storage programs, such as Finland’s five-hundred-meter-deep ONKALO facility, and of Michael Madsen’s...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2019) 11 (2): 402–426.
Published: 01 November 2019
... “geographies of sacrifice” to describe the disproportionate effects of Cold War–era nuclear testing and hazardous-waste disposal on indigenous communities in the southwestern United States. For government and industry officials, the horrors of environmental degradation and radiation-related illness on...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2013) 2 (1): 79–99.
Published: 01 May 2013
...,” Environment and planning C, Government and Policy 23, no. 2 (2005): 207–226; John McNeil, Någonting är nytt under solen – Nittonhundratalets miljöhistoria (Stockholm: SNS förlag, 2003). 25 Jonas Anshelm, “Among Demons and Wizards: The Nuclear Discourse in Sweden and the Re-enchantment of the World...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2019) 11 (2): 485–492.
Published: 01 November 2019
... terms, then, what might be an alternative biopolitics for the Anthropocene? This is an issue I have found significant guidance about in recent examinations of the governance of toxic wastes and “useless” or killable species. 14 Arguably, profound lessons about how to responsibly governmentalize our...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2019) 11 (1): 180–193.
Published: 01 May 2019
... ways of crafting knowledge is but a brushstroke in its portrait, the still or already unframed world-picture. We live and die on a dump of ideas, bodies, dreams, materials, snippets of relations, sound bites and memes, decontextualized and dehistoricized, produced as waste, clipped, isolated and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2020) 12 (2): 475–491.
Published: 01 November 2020
... Haraway and Clarke admit that different populations use natural resources, create waste, and contribute to environmental degradation to varying extents, this is often occluded by their focus on the numbers of humans living on the earth. Murphy proposes a theory of distributed reproduction that could be...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2016) 7 (1): 203–217.
Published: 01 May 2016
... reimaginings of this storied Japanese image often remark upon the dangerous, damaged state of the contemporary ocean. Such commentaries sometimes refer directly to the 2011 tsunami and to its associated Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster. But adaptations of Hokusai's Wave these days also increasingly point...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2019) 11 (2): 427–460.
Published: 01 November 2019
... including nuclear legacies and access to lands and waters, and (3) the related challenges of climate change in this region, which is already becoming one of the front lines of both rising sea levels and extreme weather events. In Australia, EH has its roots in the work of the Ecological Humanities Group...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2020) 12 (2): 407–430.
Published: 01 November 2020
... polycultures: self-maintaining forests ecosystems model the conditions for flourishing life. 36 Core permaculture principles—environmental observation, energy storage, self-regulation and feedback, producing no waste, using natural patterns to design interactions, designing interdependence rather than...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2017) 9 (1): 149–166.
Published: 01 May 2017
...” forestall various responsibilities—expanding, however gently, the time of the task. They happen in the marginal furrows of society, in the space of “waste” and pleasure as opposed to the time of duty or (re)production. Indeed, whereas networking is instrumental (Delany’s paradigmatic example is writers...