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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 343–347.
Published: 01 May 2018
... concept and mattering of wit(h)nessing . Wit(h)nessing is a word-concept seeded in ideas of co-poiesis by feminist theorist of affect, visual artist, and psychoanalyst Bracha Ettinger. 1 She writes that each of us is already in relationship before any assumption of an independent subjectivity—an I...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 265–270.
Published: 01 May 2016
.... “ Wild(Er)Ness: Reconfiguring the Geographies of Wildlife .” Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 23 ( 1998 ): 435 - 54 . Wolch J. , and Emel J. Animal Geographies. Place, Politics, and Identity in Nature-Culture Borderlands . London : Verso , 1998 . 1...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 397–420.
Published: 01 November 2018
... contribution of the village residents to my research but also undervalued the condition of my own prolonged presence in the locale as a means of producing reliable knowledge about it. The governor, I learned during the next months, was an advocate of distance in order to learn about there-ness; an advocate of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 1–11.
Published: 01 May 2014
... to show the receding process as a process. From this perspective, the time-lapse part of the EIS has less in common with its single-frame part, which straightforwardly documents something, and more with photographs of Bigfoot or the Loch Ness Monster, which attempt to convince us that something...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 113–123.
Published: 01 May 2014
... he not eat? 18 Thus togetherness can also be sometimes a question of alien-ness, disconnection, detachment, or withdrawal. An expanded understanding of togetherness therefore requires a more supple conceptual vocabulary of human-nonhuman relations. As Candea argues, a dualism between togetherness...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 71–91.
Published: 01 May 2013
... an ‘economy of the common,’ the embedded-ness of man and nature in productive labor. He described what he saw, including the “common wild and heath—the desolate face/ Of rude waste landscape far away from men.” 33 Jonathan Bate writes that the problem with Clare, from the point of view of a...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 108–128.
Published: 01 May 2017
... never does turn into thanato-politics; it simply encourages one or several dimensions of living-ness to flourish at the expense of others. The omission of the importance of nonhuman vitalities in certain forms of capitalist production is repeated every time anyone talks about the total industrial...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 129–149.
Published: 01 May 2018
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 341–358.
Published: 01 November 2017
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 378–397.
Published: 01 November 2017
... reasoning goes, are unlikely to lead physicists to revise their theories of the Sun. And what happens in the sky is assumed to be of an entirely different nature than what occurs in our skin. You could say there is a certain predisposed-ness to the core subjects of these four scientific fields: the Sun...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 149–170.
Published: 01 May 2014
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 84–107.
Published: 01 May 2017
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 72–100.
Published: 01 May 2019
... so can we see the many ways in which these elements are merged by religious communities. For the Amish, entering into environmental responsibility mirrors some aspects of a geo-spiritual relationship, but biblical interpretations become the binding agents holding the integrity of Amish-ness together...