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natural resource conflict

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 52–71.
Published: 01 May 2019
... broadly, the author suggests that narratives of conflict over the extraction of natural resources can be studied as the corpus of “resource conflict literature,” thus generating a global comparative framework for the study of contemporary indigenous struggles. © 2019 Alok Amatya 2019 This is an open...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 77–100.
Published: 01 May 2014
... considerable value, but there are conflicting ideas about the ideological framework that should define this concept. In Iceland, differing views about priorities and responsibility are spurring conflicts about the management of natural resources. The crisis following the economic collapse in 2008 has...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 349–369.
Published: 01 November 2018
... goods are being used to justify projects—hydroelectricity, mining, quarrying, the creation of nature reserves, the limits to herding—that displace Sámi practices and understandings of the land. And market logics are interacting with these to inform decisions about resources and development (including...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 187–212.
Published: 01 May 2018
... instantiation of modern industrialism: Puchuncaví’s VIC. During our field visit we met with local activists, municipal officials, and industry representatives. We walked around brownfields, illegal dumping sites, and engineered beachfronts; we had coffee in the municipal building and visited the natural gas...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 43–56.
Published: 01 May 2013
... instead of complementary.” 43 The paper grounds this conclusion in distinctions between sustainable use and protectionism, but both of those positions potentially separate humans and nature, one positioning nature as a resource, the other positioning it as pristine and outside society. There is the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 23–55.
Published: 01 May 2012
...Eben Kirksey Abstract Bruno Latour has tried to bring a parliamentary democracy to the domain of nature. Wading through the swamps of Palo Verde, a national park in the Guanacaste Province of Costa Rica, and wandering onto neighbouring agricultural lands, I failed to find a central place where...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 1–40.
Published: 01 May 2016
... have since changed and today WfW is a public agency responsible for controlling IAS infestations under the jurisdiction of the Department of Water Affairs (DWA). WfW was designed by a group of natural resource managers and scientists to explicitly link large-scale conservation efforts in the post...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 101–123.
Published: 01 May 2014
... cannot easily be assumed to be a lesser governance challenge than the ongoing UN negotiations. Geoengineering may generate new forms of conflict and rearrange global geopolitics. The global fine-tuning and calibration of technology and nature require a centralized and stable governance structure. Clark...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 57–77.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Amanda Hagood Abstract Recent scholarship on the work of the great nature writer, Rachel Carson, posits that her landmark book, Silent Spring (1962)—often credited with igniting the modern environmental movement—is best understood in the context of her earlier, extraordinarily popular publications...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 149–171.
Published: 01 November 2016
...Gisli Palsson; Heather Anne Swanson Abstract “Nature” and “social life” tended to be separated by Enlightenment thinkers, setting the stage for a long-standing tension between geology and social-cultural theory. Such a division suppressed the liveliness that humans have often attributed to material...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 25–41.
Published: 01 May 2013
... emphasize their commonality under governmental and corporate complicity. Just as the stupefying goal of a democratic Vietnam would not be encumbered by the cost to human and nonhuman life, the securing of natural resources buried in the coal seams of eastern Kentucky would not be gainsaid by property rights...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 194–215.
Published: 01 May 2019
... active social collectives and malleable environmental resources. Harvey argues against the divide between “natural commons” (water, land, and forests) and “social commons” (ideas, images, code) on the grounds that “all resources are technological, economic, and cultural appraisals, and therefore socially...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 95–117.
Published: 01 May 2016
...Hugo Reinert Abstract Can a stone be a critter? Placing multispecies studies in conversation with the geological turn, this article examines the place of a particular sacrifice stone in the ambit of a coastal mining development in northern Norway. The argument develops a reading of resource...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 118–142.
Published: 01 May 2016
... care in times of death and loss: at places of confinement and elephant suffering like the zoos in Seattle and Zürich as well as in the conflict-ridden landscapes of South India, where the country’s last free-ranging elephants live. Our stories of deadly viral-elephant-human becomings remind us that...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 421–446.
Published: 01 November 2018
... that the inarguably destructive external effects of the oil palm industry obscure the internal and conflicting affective attachments of corporate actors to seeds. I assess the ethical implications of attending to lively yet lethal capital as it emerges from situated practices of care with corporate...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 171–201.
Published: 01 May 2014
... itself anew in the natural hues of water, earth, and the softest veils of atmosphere.” 35 For environmentalists, the image had a dual meaning: a finite spaceship with dwindling resources and expanding pollution, to be sure, but also a Whole Earth mother whose biosphere appeared harmonious and self...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 147–167.
Published: 01 May 2013
... control of biospheric flows of energy and resources in excess of Nature's own ability to replenish. In this sense it represented no more than an addition to the litany of societies whose signs of impending collapse were marked by unmitigated political and social violence. The key difference is that while...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 261–276.
Published: 01 May 2014
... the environmental crisis. It might finally allow such work to attain the critical mass it needs to break out of customary disciplinary confines and reach a wider public, at a time when natural scientists have begun to acknowledge that an understanding of the environmental crisis must include insights...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 141–154.
Published: 01 May 2012
...Anna Tsing Abstract Human nature is an interspecies relationship. In this essay, Haraway's concept of companion species takes us beyond familiar companions to the rich ecological diversity without which humans cannot survive. Following fungi, we forage in the last ten thousand years of human...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 152–173.
Published: 01 May 2019
... breaching the boundary that appears to separate the insides of our bodies from our outward environments. Asbestos attests to the fact that the human does not just touch the nonhuman, culture does not just touch nature, but the boundaries between them operate within a framework of trans-corporeality, viscous...