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mineral evolution

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 215–234.
Published: 01 November 2016
...Paul Gillen Abstract Mineral evolution (ME) is a geologic paradigm postulating that Earth’s minerals formed sequentially and have interacted with life forms for billions of years. The evolution of Earth and its minerals is therefore entangled with the evolution of life. This “Provocation” ponders...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 149–171.
Published: 01 November 2016
... appreciation of the mineral and the alignment between geology and social-cultural theory. While geosocialities overlap with nature-cultures and “biosocialities,” they are “harder” in the sense of drawing attention to geology and its relation to social life. Such a move seems timely, keeping in mind the popular...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 152–173.
Published: 01 May 2019
...Sasha Litvintseva Abstract Asbestos is a fibrous mineral. Airborne asbestos—similar to nuclear radiation and chemical atmospheric pollutants—is invisible to the naked eye, and living and breathing alongside it has deferred toxic effects on human bodies. The toxicity of asbestos operates by...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 273–294.
Published: 01 May 2018
... of massive magma extrusions about 1.9 billion years ago linked to the ascendance of multicellular life; volcanism present in the East African Rift during pivotal phases of human evolution; and the volcanic activity of the early-mid Holocene viewed as a contextual factor in the emergence of ancient...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 255–279.
Published: 01 November 2017
... and locating ourselves in the place of others, sympathy read alongside machinic evolution suggests a new approach to the ecological disaster of species extinction. © 2017 Susan Ballard 2017 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 213–225.
Published: 01 May 2018
... that had served as a substratum for the emergence of biological creatures was reasserting itself, confirming that geology, far from having been left behind as a primitive stage of the earth’s evolution, fully coexisted with the soft, gelatinous newcomers.” 12 The mineral and the biological have...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 257–272.
Published: 01 May 2018
.... Mining has become Mongolia’s largest economic sector, and during the start of the 2010s mineral extraction fueled rapid rise in the GDP growth rate, which reached an all-time high of 17.3 percent in 2011 (though it has since slowed sharply, falling back to a growth rate of 2.3 percent in 2015). Yet the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 398–417.
Published: 01 November 2017
... a neutral organiser of space, but is instead a powerful cultural technology of spatial production.” 21 Antarctica and outer space are here once again conflated as the exploration of mineral and biological resources becomes increasingly viable in the case of outer space, and ever more pressing in...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 1–18.
Published: 01 May 2014
... illuminates a moment of much longer memory (albeit modest in geologic terms), and of appreciating both the rich biodiversity of the scene and its vulnerability: “how much force,” he asks rhetorically, “does it take to break the crucible of evolution?” 68 Elsewhere he answers his own question: “human impact...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 171–201.
Published: 01 May 2014
... countries that will bear the brunt of global warming's worst effects, cultural fascination with Blue Marble's afterimages reopens the fault lines between First World and Third World environmentalism already apparent at Stockholm. 26 Most scientists point to the period around 1750, when mineral-based...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 77–94.
Published: 01 May 2016
... nonliving are key parts of an ethographic account. The volcanic rock that forms the Hawaiian island chain offers a sense of what is at stake here. This lively rock prompts us to ask questions differently. It draws our attention toward what Kathryn Yusoff has called the “minerality” of the biologic; 33 it...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 233–260.
Published: 01 May 2014
... term has been used and debated by a number of environmental scientists— who study contemporary, or historically recent, biophysical processes and forms—and a number of earth scientists (aka geologists) —who study very long-term biophysical changes evident in the mineral and fossil record. Why the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 57–77.
Published: 01 May 2013
... books had helped readers redefine the scope of human life and the turbulent process of human evolution—aiding them to “gain some sense of confidence that ... new ways of life are natural and on the whole desirable”—her readers' many letters had also proven “that people everywhere are desperately eager...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 1–23.
Published: 01 May 2016
..., actively—even if not always knowingly—crafted through the sharing of “meanings, interests and affects,” 15 as well as flesh, minerals, fluids, genetic materials, and much more. As is discussed further below, this multiplicity, this multiplying of perspectives and influences, is key to what multispecies...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 108–128.
Published: 01 May 2017
... meaningfully from the mining of minerals or the burning of hydrocarbons. 17 Living beings, moreover, exist not just as objects in our world (like rocks or rivers) but also at the center of their own umwelten ; 18 thus the exploitation of living matter is, invariably, the intrusion of human artifice into...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 129–148.
Published: 01 May 2017
...—as the article’s conclusion suggests—reaffirms that all poetry (genetic, written, spoken) is biological insofar as texts and their creation are invariably contingent on the materialities of entities and matter (larynxes, bacteria, trees, papyrus, metals, minerals). This entails both a simple reminder...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 63–85.
Published: 01 May 2018
... losses associated with the widespread and unprecedented impacts of industrial and capitalist economies on the Earth’s atmospheric, biological, and geologic processes. Even the Earth’s stratigraphy tells the story of how the “increased use of metals and minerals, fossil fuels, and agricultural fertilizers...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 1–20.
Published: 01 May 2013
.... Why should I an Iowa citizen who has an excellent job (I am a Monsanto employee)[,] excellent wages, excellent safety, excellent benefits want less than that for my fellow man, regardless of race, sex or religion? 26 McEachern's evolution from the position of a Sierra Club-style...