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life

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Image
Published: 01 May 2016
Figure 1. Life cycle of Necator americanus . Image from Public Health Image Library, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ( phil.cdc.gov/ ) Figure 1. Life cycle of Necator americanus. Image from Public Health Image Library, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (phil.cdc.gov/) More
Image
Published: 01 May 2015
Figure 7. An estuary-shaped life, with the Severn bridges as time–space fulcrums (from a personal Google map). Figure 7. An estuary-shaped life, with the Severn bridges as time–space fulcrums (from a personal Google map). More
Image
Published: 01 May 2014
Figure 6 The Junk Naturals perform “Junk: A Natural Part of Life” at Ethelton, 13 April 1996. L to R: Tony Bazeley, Roger Laws, Mike Watters, Rod Boucher, Chester Schultz, Ian Farr, Anthony Pak Poy. Image courtesy Geoff Willsmore. Figure 6. The Junk Naturals perform “Junk: A Natural Part of More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 309–324.
Published: 01 November 2017
... geochemical experiments and test the boundaries of “life as we know it.” As Helmreich has put it: “Astrobiologists treat unusual environments on Earth, such as methane seeps and hydrothermal vents, as models for extraterrestrial ecologies. Framing these environments as surrogates for alternative worlds has...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 378–397.
Published: 01 November 2017
...Istvan Praet Abstract Astrobiology is normally envisaged as the scientific endeavor preoccupied with the search for life beyond Earth. What remains underappreciated, however, is that it is also a hotbed of transversal thinking. It links disciplines that have historically grown up in isolation from...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 125–148.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Dominique Lestel; Jeffrey Bussolini; Matthew Chrulew Abstract This paper presents a bi-constructivist approach to the study of animal life, which is opposed to the realist-Cartesian paradigm in which most ethology operates. The method is elaborated through the examples of a knot-tying orangutan in...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 215–234.
Published: 01 November 2016
...Paul Gillen Abstract Mineral evolution (ME) is a geologic paradigm postulating that Earth’s minerals formed sequentially and have interacted with life forms for billions of years. The evolution of Earth and its minerals is therefore entangled with the evolution of life. This “Provocation” ponders...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 230–254.
Published: 01 November 2017
... the Other and the Anti-cancer Survival Kit reveal the political life of cancer to be animated by cellular and culinary anarchisms, bile, toxicity, frustration, and, in da Costa’s words, “more than even I can take.” These approaches to the microbes of Invisible Earthlings build on da Costa’s...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 280–299.
Published: 01 November 2017
.... The rhetorical figure is characteristic of the environmental humanities, for it invokes the value of cultural and literary treasures to reinforce the importance of biological diversity. This article traces the origins of the metaphor to related figures of The Book of Life and to the figure of genetic...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 341–358.
Published: 01 November 2017
...Antonia Walford; Donnacha Kirk Abstract This article explores how taking physical cosmology and the entities that populate its fringes on their own terms might prompt anthropology to rethink what and how it thinks of life. Physical cosmologists work with inanimate matter that lies at the frontier...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 433–453.
Published: 01 November 2017
... intelligent life in outer space can be traced back to our earliest times. 1 The possible existence of extraterrestrial intelligence has stretched our imagination and our conceptions of what it is to be a thinking, self-conscious, living being. Scientific discoveries and explanations since the sixteenth...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 398–417.
Published: 01 November 2017
...Juan Francisco Salazar Abstract This article explores world-making processes through which extreme frontiers of life are made habitable. Examining how notions of life are enlarged, incorporated, and appropriated in complex geopolitical contexts, the article argues that microbial worlds are becoming...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 71–91.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Patrick Bresnihan Abstract There are growing and justifiable concerns about the degradation of the planet—the land, sea and atmosphere on which all life depends. While these problems unfold on a global scale they are not evenly distributed, either in terms of cause or effect. This has not stopped...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 93–109.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Deborah Bird Rose Abstract Towards the end of her eventful and productive life, Val Plumwood was turning toward Indigenous people and cultures as a way of encountering the lived experience of ideas she was working with theoretically. At the same time, she was defining herself as a philosophical...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 108–128.
Published: 01 May 2017
...Les Beldo Abstract Amid mounting concerns over viral and bacterial outbreaks in industrial farm settings, scholars of modern industrial agriculture have increasingly focused their attention on the dangers posed by an “excess of life.” While important, this focus tends to produce a narrative in...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 359–377.
Published: 01 November 2017
... sources, I detail the history of the bioregenerative life-support system, a system in which simple organisms—most commonly algae—would inhabit the spacecraft and, through a series of interspecies symbioses, maintain cabin conditions and sustain astronaut life. By homing in on the maintenance practices of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 418–432.
Published: 01 November 2017
...Jessica O’reilly Abstract From a distance, Antarctica invokes extreme imaginaries and possibilities. In the practice of everyday human Antarctic life, however, daily tasks and risks are heavily managed, mitigated, and overseen. To analyze the spectacular and mundane natures of human life in...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 3–26.
Published: 01 May 2019
...Bradley M. Jones Abstract This article explores the cultivation of life in ruins. At the foothills of Appalachia, I focus on a permaculture farmer—Sally of Clearwater Creek—fostering arts of (making a) living on a damaged planet. Ethnography in the Anthropocene requires tending and attending to...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 129–147.
Published: 01 May 2013
... Anthropocene refuses to challenge human dominion, proposing instead technological and managerial approaches that would make human dominion sustainable. By the same token, the Anthropocene discourse blocks from consideration the possibility of abolishing a way of life founded on the domination of nature. In...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 1–27.
Published: 01 May 2015
...Figure 7. An estuary-shaped life, with the Severn bridges as time–space fulcrums (from a personal Google map). Figure 7. An estuary-shaped life, with the Severn bridges as time–space fulcrums (from a personal Google map). ...