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insects

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Published: 01 March 2024
Figure 1. Example of a sticky card covered in dead insects, after deployment and collection from a New York highway roadside in 2021. More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2024) 16 (1): 211–229.
Published: 01 March 2024
...Figure 1. Example of a sticky card covered in dead insects, after deployment and collection from a New York highway roadside in 2021. ...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2021) 13 (2): 323–347.
Published: 01 November 2021
... the A. aegypti so that they can be deployed to control their own population—here, mosquito breeding and mating is operationalized as an insecticide. In this case, the insect must be simultaneously a friend and an enemy, cared for and killed, and it must establish encounters and nonencounters. Drawing...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2023) 15 (2): 1–18.
Published: 01 July 2023
... harmful metabolisms of insects and fungi become integral parts of plantation cultivation—though not always successfully. The article widens our understanding of how green production methods are envisioned not as alternatives to but rather as support for industrial cultivation systems. In the Nilgiri...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2017) 9 (2): 255–279.
Published: 01 November 2017
.... By interspersing a story of humans and machines with insect life, Butler pointed to a broad imaginative web of interspecies and machinic relationships. Contemporary artists Pierre Huyghe, Ann Lislegaard, and Hayden Fowler use video and installation art to explore interspecies relationships in time and space...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2012) 1 (1): 23–55.
Published: 01 May 2012
... foam frog was just one tenacious parasite, a noisy agent eating at the table of another, which began to flourish in worlds designed with the well-being of others in mind. Cattails, charismatic birds, and a multitude of insects began interrupting human dreams and schemes. Final solutions to the problem...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2019) 11 (1): 174–179.
Published: 01 May 2019
... . Hughes Claude L. Jr. “ Phytochemical Mimicry of Reproductive Hormones and Modulation of Herbivore Fertility by Phytoestrogens .” Environmental Health Perspectives 78 ( 1988 ): 171 – 75 . Mechoulam R. , Brueggemeier R. W. , and Denlinger D. L. . “ Estrogens in Insects...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2016) 8 (2): 235–239.
Published: 01 November 2016
..., of the regenerative power of rot to compost and provision. 2 Our special interest was deadwood insects—busy, vital decomposers that break down fallen trees. The stag beetle was our talisman minibeast ( fig. 1 ). Britain’s largest insect: a charismatic flagship for a neglected ark of rotten creepy-crawlies...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2014) 4 (1): 113–123.
Published: 01 May 2014
... Philosophies of Nature,” Environment and Planning A 40, no.7 (2008): 1583-1597. 40 Nigel Clark, “Mobile Life: Biosecurity Practices and Insect Globalization,” Science as Culture 22, No.1 (2013): 18; Ann H. Kelly and Uli Beisel, “Neglected Malarias: The Frontlines and Back Alleys of Global Health...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2014) 4 (1): 149–170.
Published: 01 May 2014
... of the insect race,” but some believe that the bee is also “raising the alarm for humankind.” 5 Pollinator decline is being taken seriously by citizen groups, military spooks, and all those with a stake in industrial agriculture, from derivatives traders, to small-holders, to regulatory bodies. 6 What...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2022) 14 (3): 499–521.
Published: 01 November 2022
... of land, seized through settler-plantation expansion on a commodity frontier built upon dispossession, appropriation, and enslavement. 1 Cotton plantations are nutrient-hungry, deriving profit from the exhaustion of land and soil. They are also vulnerable to disease and predation by insects, ecological...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2022) 14 (2): 438–456.
Published: 01 July 2022
... butterflies dream? Entomologists still know so little about the sleep of insects, let alone the more tenuous states of consciousness they may drift into. The monarchs wintering in Mexico fall into a lengthy state of quiescence, a “reproductive torpor,” as the renowned monarch biologist Lincoln Brower has put...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2018) 10 (2): 370–396.
Published: 01 November 2018
... and adaptation (i.e., their prolific production of wind-born seeds with a high germination rate and their tendency to produce blossoms more quickly after pruning) is to require repeated application of control measures that are only partially successful and often harmful to insect, bird, and other plant life. 34...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2016) 8 (2): 215–234.
Published: 01 November 2016
... that reproduced sexually. 53 However, the most significant mineralogical consequence of sentience could well have been the coevolution of sentient pollinating insects and flowering plants. The supplanting of conifers by angiosperms a hundred million years ago was facilitated by pollinating insects...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2023) 15 (1): 87–108.
Published: 01 March 2023
... environmental changes through episodic delays and encounters. All over the world, thousands of cicadas sing of manifold insect life at frequencies and speeds both within and beyond established thresholds of human sense detection. 24 Most notably, today they sing of perpetually changing forest ecologies...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2012) 1 (1): 57–68.
Published: 01 May 2012
... of the project, I was immediately struck by the list of endangered species: “ten plants, four birds, two reptiles, two insects and one mammal.” 9 What I bore witness to in that flash of recognition was my desire to compose a story in which these nineteen as yet to be identified characters lived out...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2016) 7 (1): 191–202.
Published: 01 May 2016
... example they offer is a study from the 1980s exploring how trees exude different kinds of chemical scents in response to insect predation. 28 For Marder, plant language is not invisible and inaudible, but an aspect of their visible presence in the world. He contends that “plants, like all living...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2022) 14 (2): 284–302.
Published: 01 July 2022
... for Arthropods .” In Material Agency , edited by Knappett Carl and Malafouris Lambros , 209 – 15 . Boston : Springer , 2008 . Jang Seonghan , and Kikuchi Yoshitomo . “ Impact of the Insect Gut Microbiota on Ecology, Evolution, and Industry .” Current Opinion in Insect Science...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2017) 9 (2): 204–229.
Published: 01 November 2017
... prompted genetic and epigenetic mutations in insects, fungi, and weeds, transforming them into so-called super insects, super fungi, and super weeds. 1 In many ways, these nonhuman mutants that were previously nonprevalent or nonexistent, have become allies of humans resisting the RR-soy bioeconomy. 2...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2022) 14 (1): 237–239.
Published: 01 March 2022
..., is a place of multi-identity living. Plant, ant, and fungi live together on a tree. There are four species involved at any given point in time, but carcasses of other insects can be found in ant plant labyrinths too. Different genera of ants can live in the ant plant, such as the golden ant. It is a dwelling...