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inorganic life

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2018) 10 (1): 187–212.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Manuel Tironi; Myra J. Hird; Cristián Simonetti; Peter Forman; Nathaniel Freiburger Abstract In this choral essay we, an assorted group of academics interested in inorganic life and matter, explore a mode of thinking and feeling with our objects of inquiry—chemicals, waste, cement, gas...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2023) 15 (2): 39–61.
Published: 01 July 2023
...Mankei Tam Abstract This article explores soil and the multiple pathways it has provided for the coconstitution of forms of life that might be possible following the Fukushima nuclear fallout. In Iitate, a former evacuation zone where radiation still lingers, farmers and concerned citizens deploy...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2016) 8 (1): 95–117.
Published: 01 May 2016
... the invocation of a planetary totality—say, an accountability to “the earth,” usually understood as a living system—or in terms of ensuring its continued capacity to support and enable life. There is very little space, even within the critical narratives, to accommodate the inorganic as anything other than...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2023) 15 (3): 140–144.
Published: 01 November 2023
.... In my own discipline of sociocultural anthropology, concerns around the geological and the inorganic have been bubbling up for a few years now. In the introduction to a 2020 edition of the journal Cultural Anthropology ’s “Theorizing the Contemporary” Editors’ Forum on “geological anthropology,” Zeynep...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2023) 15 (3): 284–291.
Published: 01 November 2023
... of geoscientific practices for the possibility of different earths and relations, and so must be considered a political medium of contestation in subjective states. Geotrauma is the result of epistemic and material partitions in the relation between subjective attachments and inorganic forces...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2024) 16 (1): 265–269.
Published: 01 March 2024
... in economic thinking. Without going into the intricate genealogy of this “great derangement,” we simply note that a powerful natural analogy is at work: if the process of growth is fundamental to biological flourishing, then it must be for economic life too. 1 In this way, it becomes hard to think about...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2018) 10 (1): 273–294.
Published: 01 May 2018
..., we explore the more enigmatic processes through which subterranean geologic forces offer an excessive potentiality from which humans and other life forms select and actualize a narrower range of creative or generative possibilities. The article explores three significant volcanic episodes: a series...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2014) 4 (1): 1–18.
Published: 01 May 2014
... relationality of daily life” and it's potential as a “powerful social tool for producing, managing, and/or undermining various understandings of who or what is in relation with other beings or things.” 5 This is particularly pressing given that, as Chakrabarty has observed, the ascription of geological...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2014) 4 (1): 171–194.
Published: 01 May 2014
... that: “The organic becomes the living ... that which produces, grows, and reproduces; the inorganic is the non-living, that which neither develops nor reproduces.” 20 Foucault's account of modern Euro-American thought's sequestering of life within individual organic bodies reserves a particularly intriguing...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2022) 14 (2): 494–498.
Published: 01 July 2022
...Jane Bennett janebennett@jhu.edu © 2022 Jane Bennett 2022 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0). When The Enchantment of Modern Life came out in 2001, right after the 9/11 attacks in the United States, I...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2019) 11 (2): 467–476.
Published: 01 November 2019
... and, therefore, beyond specific ecosystemic transformations. Lastly, the Anthropocene indicates the potential extinction of the conditions of the biosphere that enable human life on Earth. Since the changes in the conditions of the biosphere are the result of colonialism, capitalism, and a consumption...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2017) 9 (1): 108–128.
Published: 01 May 2017
..., Vibrant Matter . 15. Bennett’s “vital materialism” depends on what I would argue is an analogy rather than a continuity between living and nonliving things, generalizing some but not all of life’s characteristic properties to inorganic matter; to wit, self-organization, but not purposive self...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2020) 12 (1): 205–226.
Published: 01 May 2020
... by Modern Life: A Series of Addresses and Arguments on the Claims of Scientific Education , edited by Tyndell John et al . New York : D. Appleton and Company , 1867 . Lipman Timothy . “ Vitalism and Reductionism in Liebig’s Physiological Thought .” Isis 58 , no. 2 ( 1967 ): 167...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2023) 15 (3): 159–173.
Published: 01 November 2023
...Andrea Marston Abstract This article explores the uneven geosocial traces created by transcontinental and corporeal circulations of tin ore, metallic tin, and tin cans from the mid-nineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries. Although tin has no essential relationship to human life, I argue...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2023) 15 (3): 145–158.
Published: 01 November 2023
... materialized, over several centuries, in the earthly conditions of life itself; and (b) represents a critical potential for creating new ways to live on earth through the practical exploration of geosocial relations. We highlight three modes of earth praxis. Inhuman territorializations calls attention...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2016) 7 (1): 133–150.
Published: 01 May 2016
... histories and futurities. We do so in order to grapple with the possibilities of our entangled inheritances and precarious futures in these ecologically challenging times. We ask how we might create new modes of relation that foster the flourishing of all life forms, rather than shifting towards...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2017) 9 (2): 325–340.
Published: 01 November 2017
... witnessed Neil Armstrong’s televised historic first steps, sits in his backyard, stares up at a destination he longs to set foot on, and uses his thumb to block out the Moon’s presence in the sky. Later in the movie, with his life imperiled, his damaged ship comes around the dark side of the Moon and blue...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2020) 12 (1): 250–266.
Published: 01 May 2020
...Germain Meulemans Abstract This article examines the rise of urban soils as a topic of scientific inquiry and ecological engineering in France, and questions how new framings of soil as a material that can be designed reconfigure relationships between urban life and soils in a context of fast...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2019) 11 (1): 137–151.
Published: 01 May 2019
... This is one way in which the Arctic serves as a vanguard of the planetary “new normal”: an early window on the realities of life on a “damaged planet,” 2 on modes of terrestrial life that have been altered, 3 or recomposed, through the cellular bioaccumulation of microplastics, 4 heavy metals...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2022) 14 (3): 602–617.
Published: 01 November 2022
... for school children instead of women: Under the guidance of the teachers, who are merely following the mandatory curriculum of the schoolbooks, the young souls are forced to study the sexual life of plants in the smallest detail. Without batting an eye, the teacher leads the pure minds into a hotbed of sin...