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hyperobject

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 May 2018
... apocalypse as they circulate traumatically in three texts: George Miller’s film Mad Max: Fury Road (2015), Marina Zurkow’s animation Slurb (2009), and Briohny Doyle’s novel The Island Will Sink (2016). Climate catastrophe, that most threatening yet elusive of hyperobjects, marks and emerges irresistibly from...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 174–179.
Published: 01 May 2019
...Adam Dickinson Abstract Through the proliferation of plastics, and chemical pollution more generally, petrochemicals constitute forms of social, material, and biological writing. How might contemporary writers respond to the capacity of petrochemical hyperobjects to influence social formations or...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 143–148.
Published: 01 May 2016
..., Hyperobjects , 4, 7. 2. Ibid., 1. 3. US National Forest Service, “Frequently Asked Questions about Mountain Pine Beetles in Colorado,” www.fs.fed.us/rmrs/docs/bark-beetle/faq.pdf (accessed November 18, 2015). 4. Ibid. 5. Sims et al., “Complementarity in the Provision of Ecosystem...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 310–329.
Published: 01 May 2018
... straightforwardly sensible way (becomes symbolically meaningful, as in, the weather is changing or Gaia is taking “revenge” on us) even though it conditions our very existence. This is more or less what Timothy Morton means by “hyperobjects.” Indeed, one of his examples of these things “massively distributed in...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 203–216.
Published: 01 May 2014
... San Joaquin Valley is called—that gives the book its title. “[W]e are no longer able to think history as exclusively human,” writes Timothy Morton in Hyperobjects (2013), “for the very reason that we live in the Anthropocene.” 10 Pendell's novel suggests that the same is true for storytelling...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 241–256.
Published: 01 May 2018
.... 13. Ibid., 46. 14. Ibid., 51. 15. Morton, Hyperobjects , 99. 16. Ibid. See also Morton, Ecological Thought , 28, where he uses the phrase “neutral-seeming backdrop.” 17. Ibid. 18. Farrier, “How the Concept of Deep Time Is Changing.” 19. Ibid. 20...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 213–225.
Published: 01 May 2018
.... Yusoff, “Politics of the Anthropocene,” 6. 15. Rose, “Multispecies Knots of Ethical Time”; T. Clark, Ecocriticism at the Edge . 16. Bastian and van Dooren, “New Immortals.” 17. Morton, Hyperobjects . 18. Tsing, Mushroom at the End of the World ; Haraway, Staying with the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 152–173.
Published: 01 May 2019
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 171–201.
Published: 01 May 2014
... deeper questions about complexity, evolutionary emergence, and the limits of scientific prediction. 20 In my reading, fractals also serve as indices of the vertiginous spatiality and inescapable viscosity of the hyperobjects we encounter in the Anthropocene, and yet the imagination of the global...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 85–102.
Published: 01 May 2012
... included in the class of what Morton calls “ hyperobjects, products such as Styrofoam and plutonium that exist on almost unthinkable timescales.” 27 Dioxin has a long half-life, and its own half-life interferes with and changes the life span of an organism, making the question, “What is the half-life...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 1–18.
Published: 01 May 2014
... simply disjunctive.” 6 In effect, humanity has conjured the spectre of itself as a hyperobject, whose massive distribution in time and space forces a rethinking of the relation between objects and ontology. 7 Paradoxically, then, the Anthropocene bears witness to a radical cleaving of the human...