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humanist

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 233–260.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Noel Castree Abstract “The Anthropocene” is now a buzzword in international geoscience circles and commanding the attention of various social scientists and humanists. Once a trickle, I review what is now a growing stream of publications authored by humanists about the Holocene's proclaimed end. I...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 125–148.
Published: 01 May 2014
... a (supposedly) exclusionary politics of nature, in a move that betrayed a still largely humanist ethics. From the focus on friendly companions, to the attention to practices of care or living-together, the notion of companion species and their entanglements with humans has been polarized towards a...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 447–472.
Published: 01 November 2018
... exceptional. The modern idea of human exceptionality is thus shown to be based in large part on a scientifically dubious, and culturally specific, argument about the nature-transcendent quality of beings that walk upright. This is a particular form of humanist discourse that often forgets its own...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 169–186.
Published: 01 May 2013
... based on those beliefs. I suggest that we philosophers and humanists generally can do our part to reintegrate science and its epistemology into the wider culture by expressing the new nature of Nature, as revealed by the sciences, in the grammar of the humanities. The putatively “value-free” discourse...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 280–299.
Published: 01 November 2017
... and humanists. 2 It is effective because it summons the prestige of ancient and profound knowledge in support of new scientific techniques in microbiology and genomics, even as the content of that ancient knowledge is unknown or inaccessible. Rhetoric and metaphor in literary texts are the research...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 149–155.
Published: 01 May 2013
... sciences: I suggest that we philosophers and humanists generally can do our part to reintegrate science and its epistemology into the wider culture by expressing the new nature of Nature as revealed in the sciences, in the grammar of the humanities. The putatively “value-free” discourse of science—a...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 233–238.
Published: 01 May 2016
... amazing opportunity.’ Unashamed to place ‘good’ next to ‘Anthropocene,’ they believe “we will be proud of the planet we create in the Anthropocene” 4 and are fond of quoting Stewart Brand: “We are as gods, so we may as well get good at it.” Although the ecomoderns write as humanists, they construe...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 147–167.
Published: 01 May 2013
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 149–153.
Published: 01 May 2014
... the last few years, for instance, the concept has been discussed in The Economist (26 May, 2011), in the Global Change Magazine 78 (19 March, 2012), and in the newsletter of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme. Moreover, the first book-length treatises written by humanists have now...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 261–276.
Published: 01 May 2014
... it needs to have an impact in the public sphere. Before that happens, however, ecocritics, environmental historians, environmental philosophers, and other humanists need to be jolted out of disciplinary ruts and mindsets, which should prompt them to reassess the character of their own work and its...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 265–270.
Published: 01 May 2016
... well. Divorcing creatures from their means of subsistence, fencing animal bodies from ecological and reproductive ties, are but means of ongoing accumulation. They comprise regimes of ‘lively capital’ where nonhuman labour is at stake. 24 Humanist frameworks of conventional political economy are...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 155–170.
Published: 01 May 2014
... philosophers search for truth in ancient texts whose authority they themselves generate by circulating, annotating and shuffling them about in ever-new fashions. The problem here is that modern climate scientists have almost as much in common with the humanists of Padua as they do with Galileo. They...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 245–254.
Published: 01 May 2016
..., values, and wellbeing, and aspiring to the achievement of human dignity and the realization of human potential. Freedom is the precondition for the highest expression of the human and thus the ultimate value of humanism. Humanist goals are realized as authoritarian regimes fall, democratic forms of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 21–41.
Published: 01 May 2013
... considerations. 7 Exceptionalism, whether religious or humanist, 8 regards human communities as distinguished by an ethics and/or politics in which no beings other than humans can possibly participate. Insofar as forms of exemptionalism and exceptionalism assume (as they usually do) that only what matters...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 256–262.
Published: 01 November 2016
... as a literary device that provides the reader with a reprieve from narratives of loss and destruction. Religious stories of hope are far more profound for the religious believer than merely optimistic, humanistic accounts of recovery, since their inner existential anchor rests in trust in the One who...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 277–284.
Published: 01 November 2016
... utterly fatal mistake to make in the age of climate change. This is especially the case given the extraordinary developments in religiously motivated environmentalism in recent decades, the apogee of which may very well be Pope Francis’s Laudato si’ . While environmental humanists in fields such as...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 501–527.
Published: 01 November 2018
... with oil (not to mention a coded representation of postwar white Australia’s eagerness to transform itself into potential lover to the United States). For the purposes of expediently illustrating how the environmental humanities project differs from earlier modes of humanist enquiry, however, the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 125–148.
Published: 01 May 2014
... Marchesini describes how “in the humanistic transfiguration the concept of the Umwelt becomes a way to legitimise the disjunctive reading, if humans alone among living beings are understood to exit from the epimethean bubble. Exiting from the bubble means, in reality, not having one, or not being contained...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 473–500.
Published: 01 November 2018
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 129–147.
Published: 01 May 2013
... upon it. As sociologist Urlich Beck noted two decades ago, humanity has become threatened by the side-effects of its technological and expansionist excesses (1992). The Anthropocene discourse is deeply concerned about this “risk civilization.” But cloistered as it remains within a humanistic...