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Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 2. Jerusalem artichoke in human vision (left), simulated butterfly vision (middle), and simulated bee vision (right), photographed by Klaus Schmitt. Both butterflies and bees can see into the near-ultraviolet (UV-A). Used with permission. Figure 2. Jerusalem artichoke in human vision More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 2. Jerusalem artichoke in human vision (left), simulated butterfly vision (middle), and simulated bee vision (right), photographed by Klaus Schmitt. Both butterflies and bees can see into the near-ultraviolet (UV-A). Used with permission. Figure 2. Jerusalem artichoke in human vision More
Image
Published: 01 May 2019
Figure 3. Mantras for the more-than-human economy. Photo by author. Figure 3. Mantras for the more-than-human economy. Photo by author. More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 2. Jerusalem artichoke in human vision (left), simulated butterfly vision (middle), and simulated bee vision (right), photographed by Klaus Schmitt. Both butterflies and bees can see into the near-ultraviolet (UV-A). Used with permission. Figure 2. Jerusalem artichoke in human vision More
Image
Published: 01 May 2019
Figure 3. Mantras for the more-than-human economy. Photo by author. Figure 3. Mantras for the more-than-human economy. Photo by author. More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 53–71.
Published: 01 May 2015
...Andrew Whitehouse Abstract Ever since Rachel Carson predicted a “silent spring” environmentalists have been carefully and anxiously listening to birds. More recently the musician and scientist Bernie Krause has examined the effects of human activity on avian soundscapes throughout the world. He...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 169–190.
Published: 01 May 2016
...Alexander R. D. Zahara; Myra J. Hird Abstract As capitalism's unintended, and often unacknowledged, fallout, humans have developed sophisticated technologies to squirrel away our discards: waste is buried, burned, gasified, thrown into the ocean, and otherwise kept out-of-sight and out-of-mind...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 171–194.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Jeremy Brice Abstract What place might killing occupy in a more-than-human world, where human life is always-already entangled among nonhumans? In this article I attempt to unsettle the assumption that only individual organisms can be killed, and to render other sites and spaces of killing visible...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 147–167.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Mark Levene Abstract The accumulating evidence on the depth and accelerating trajectory of anthropogenic climate change poses the possibility of an early end to human existence as part of a more general biotic extinction. But if that is the case what does that mean for the latter day writing of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 447–472.
Published: 01 November 2018
...Kay Anderson; Colin Perrin Abstract In the context of current concerns within the environmental humanities to challenge the idea that humans are somehow irreducible to nature, this article takes up the much-neglected history of the idea of human exceptionality itself. According to now familiar...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 3–26.
Published: 01 May 2019
...Figure 3. Mantras for the more-than-human economy. Photo by author. Figure 3. Mantras for the more-than-human economy. Photo by author. ...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 May 2012
... license permits use and distribution of the article for non-commercial purposes, provided the original work is cited and is not altered or transformed. Welcome to the first volume of this new, international, open-access journal. Environmental Humanities aims to support and further a wide range of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 69–84.
Published: 01 May 2012
... commonalities, particularly about who are the experts in managing the future of the natural world. The commonalities reflect global forces that are changing the environmental management of local places. The paper considers the value of art, history and the broader humanities in enriching and critiquing global...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 233–260.
Published: 01 May 2014
... arenas than do humanities subjects. The same can be said of particular social science fields, such as environmental economics. By surveying the wider, febrile geoscience landscape in which the Anthropocene proposition is situated, I reveal opportunities for “engaged-analysis.” This involves...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 261–276.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Hannes Bergthaller; Rob Emmett; Adeline Johns-Putra; Agnes Kneitz; Susanna Lidström; Shane McCorristine; Isabel Pérez Ramos; Dana Phillips; Kate Rigby; Libby Robin Abstract The emergence of the environmental humanities presents a unique opportunity for scholarship to tackle the human dimensions of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 191–202.
Published: 01 May 2016
... to interpret and mobilise the philosopher's concepts. Ultimately, this essay articulates how Marder's strikingly negative critical project is both lively and useful for the Environmental Humanities, especially the fields of ecocriticism and critical plant studies. Moreover, in contrast to many book...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 213–220.
Published: 01 May 2014
... genuine possibility of avoiding ultimate ecological destruction. —John Bellamy Foster, The Ecological Revolution A defining quality of the ecological or environmental humanities (EH) movement is its persistent resistance to being nailed down. To be sure, this resilience is by design. As Deborah...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 95–112.
Published: 01 May 2014
... to screen-based media. Following Schivelbusch's emphasis on the sensory and experiential quality of the human-landscape relation, I will focus on the roles media forms can play in shaping relationships between people and landscapes. In such a perspective, Schivelbusch's insights in The Railway...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 277–284.
Published: 01 November 2016
... inheritances to create new responsibilities for unexpected problems . 4 In practical terms, this means that ecocritics ought to start by acknowledging that the literature that most powerfully shapes attitudes and behaviors for the vast majority of humanity today comes from religious traditions and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 501–527.
Published: 01 November 2018
... environmental humanities. Building on Donna Haraway’s work, we insist “it matters what compostables make compost.” Our argument is twofold. First, we contend that certain feminist concepts and commitments are foundational to the environmental humanities’ contemporary emergence. Second, we advocate for more...