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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 240–244.
Published: 01 November 2016
...Céline Granjou; Juan Francisco Salazar Copyright © 2016 Céline Granjou and Juan Francisco Salazar 2016 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). The future has long been viewed in terms of modernity’s human-centered categories of...
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the Future” series. Each poster takes a trait (more gravity relative to Earth [a]; two host stars [b]; star redder than the Sun [c]; planet orbiting no star [d]) of a known exoplanet and imagines human life. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech. Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the Future” series. Each poster takes a trait (more gravity relative to Earth [a]; two host stars [b]; star redder than the Sun [c]; planet orbiting no star [d]) of a known exoplanet and imagines human life. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech. Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the Future” series. Each poster takes a trait (more gravity relative to Earth [a]; two host stars [b]; star redder than the Sun [c]; planet orbiting no star [d]) of a known exoplanet and imagines human life. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech. Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the Future” series. Each poster takes a trait (more gravity relative to Earth [a]; two host stars [b]; star redder than the Sun [c]; planet orbiting no star [d]) of a known exoplanet and imagines human life. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech. Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the Future” series. Each poster takes a trait (more gravity relative to Earth [a]; two host stars [b]; star redder than the Sun [c]; planet orbiting no star [d]) of a known exoplanet and imagines human life. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech. Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the Future” series. Each poster takes a trait (more gravity relative to Earth [a]; two host stars [b]; star redder than the Sun [c]; planet orbiting no star [d]) of a known exoplanet and imagines human life. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech. Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the Future” series. Each poster takes a trait (more gravity relative to Earth [a]; two host stars [b]; star redder than the Sun [c]; planet orbiting no star [d]) of a known exoplanet and imagines human life. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech. Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the Future” series. Each poster takes a trait (more gravity relative to Earth [a]; two host stars [b]; star redder than the Sun [c]; planet orbiting no star [d]) of a known exoplanet and imagines human life. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech. Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the Future” series. Each poster takes a trait (more gravity relative to Earth [a]; two host stars [b]; star redder than the Sun [c]; planet orbiting no star [d]) of a known exoplanet and imagines human life. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech. Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the Future” series. Each poster takes a trait (more gravity relative to Earth [a]; two host stars [b]; star redder than the Sun [c]; planet orbiting no star [d]) of a known exoplanet and imagines human life. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech. Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the Future” series. Each poster takes a trait (more gravity relative to Earth [a]; two host stars [b]; star redder than the Sun [c]; planet orbiting no star [d]) of a known exoplanet and imagines human life. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech. Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the Future” series. Each poster takes a trait (more gravity relative to Earth [a]; two host stars [b]; star redder than the Sun [c]; planet orbiting no star [d]) of a known exoplanet and imagines human life. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech. Figure 1. JPL’s “Visions of the More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 310–329.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Stefan Skrimshire Abstract What is the best way to communicate with far future human (and/or posthuman) societies? This sounds like a question for science fiction, but I ask it in the context of a pressing issue in environmental ethics: the (very) long-term disposal of high-level spent radioactive...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 181–203.
Published: 01 November 2017
... has been trapped in the air bubbles between the ice crystals as they form annually; this knowledge also feeds into modeling the climate’s future. Ice cores are not simply important sources of environmental knowledge, but have become important elements of global environmental representations and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 473–500.
Published: 01 November 2018
...Matthew Schneider-Mayerson Abstract Climate fiction—literature explicitly focused on climate change—has exploded over the last decade, and is often assumed to have a positive ecopolitical influence by enabling readers to imagine potential climate futures and persuading them of the gravity and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 40–62.
Published: 01 May 2018
... completely reengineer the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, designing an organism with improved capacities for scientific research and diverse industrial applications. Notably, synthetic yeast has present connections with the wine industry and likely futures in our wider foodscapes. Here I suggest that we...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 13–33.
Published: 01 May 2014
... graphs of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change organize time in a way aligned with Giorgio Agamben's concept of messianic time. Like Agamben's messianic time, the figures of the IPCC depict a disjointed present. Every figure is either a reconstruction of past climate or a projection of future...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 501–527.
Published: 01 November 2018
... inclusive feminist composting for the future of our field. We begin with a critical cartography of some of the field’s origin stories. While we discover that feminism is named or not named in several different ways, what most interests us here is a particular trend we observe, whereby key feminist scholars...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 May 2018
.... Ann Kaplan (2016), Timothy Morton (2013), and others, this article argues that these affects of climate catastrophe are traumatically affecting without necessarily being traumatizing: they are jarring, rupturing, disjunctive experiences of future crisis in the now. This article traces these affects of...