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feeling

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 123–140.
Published: 01 May 2012
... placed affect at the very centre of contemporary narratives that call for pro-environmental beliefs and behaviours. A critical public-feelings framework is used to explore these issues and trace their passage from the private and intimate, where they risk remaining denuded of agency, and into the public...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 60–83.
Published: 01 May 2017
... position as phenomenological subjects within it. The works’ emphasis on an ecology of individual encounter and feeling situate the experiencing subject at their center, providing an analogue to the human centering that marks the era of the Anthropocene. While Bruno Latour has claimed that Eliasson’s...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 187–212.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Manuel Tironi; Myra J. Hird; Cristián Simonetti; Peter Forman; Nathaniel Freiburger Abstract In this choral essay we, an assorted group of academics interested in inorganic life and matter, explore a mode of thinking and feeling with our objects of inquiry—chemicals, waste, cement, gas, and the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 85–102.
Published: 01 May 2012
... shift our understanding of our affective relationship to the environment. Linguistic experimentation can shift awareness toward an understanding of the link between “what it felt like to have been a subject” and “what it felt like to have been earth” 1 as well as what it feels like now to be...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 131–157.
Published: 01 May 2015
..., one of the NPS managers' goals is to make visitors “feel the era,” to facilitate a physical and emotional sense of the camp experience that is historically authentic. 4 To this end, the interpretive center, which is located in the camp's original auditorium building, collects diverse artifacts: a...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 338–342.
Published: 01 May 2018
... changing place while paradoxically feeling displaced. 6 When envisioned from the perspective of the aesthetic encounters of art and the Anthropocene, installation produces aesthetic sensibilities about whether human beings can imagine less destructive ways of interacting with the world. With its...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 307–311.
Published: 01 May 2014
... contradistinction to history, is marked by irregular and uncertain boundaries. Furthermore, memory and emotions are linked; events are not disconnected from feelings. 1 With a view to unpacking these distinctions, we might revisit the multifarious links between memory, thinking and affect. Variously...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 84–107.
Published: 01 May 2017
... long privileged verbal communications. The mad, as Michel Foucault taught long ago, are incited to bear witness to their deviance in speech. 4 Psychotherapy often seeks to turn inchoate feelings into coherent narrative. How then is interspecies communication implicated in understanding and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 133–150.
Published: 01 May 2016
..., tunneling wombats, feral pigs, and swarming mosquitoes remind us that these challenges are messy, often unpredictable, infused with contradictory feelings of love, dislike, fear and wellbeing that prompt us to face the fraught relations between multispecies coexistence and violence. The proposal that...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 241–256.
Published: 01 May 2018
... signify something—global warming—that is both “real” and “weird,” to use Schneider’s terms; something that has local effects, where we can feel the raindrops on our hands and see them dotting the street, but that also signifies an entity at a much larger scale, in terms of both spatiality and complexity...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 111–127.
Published: 01 May 2013
... without a thought to anything but my technique. I wasn't at it long enough for slaughtering chickens to become routine, but the work did begin to feel mechanical, and that feeling, perhaps more than any other, was disconcerting: how quickly you can get used to anything, especially when the people around...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 473–500.
Published: 01 November 2018
...] in any way,” since he “already believed many of the things in this book to be possible.” 52 A Washingtonian said that Kim Stanley Robinson’s Forty Signs of Rain “didn’t really change my mind more than say, [the films] 2012 , or The Day After Tomorrow . 53 It just kind of gave me a feeling...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 216–238.
Published: 01 May 2019
... By performing transecological close readings, 1 I investigate in this article the ethics as well as feelings that emerge in different artworks and activist writings. Each in their own way, the discussed works consider meetings between ticks and trans bodies and their shared existence in a Western...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 287–290.
Published: 01 May 2014
... narrative arc. Perhaps it is more inclusive to allow for a range of complex outcomes for different animals, plants, and ecosystems. When we smooth out the wrinkles, when we leave people feeling comfortable, when we strive for the transcendental, we risk losing—writes Maria Tumarkin—the “friction-and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 1–27.
Published: 01 May 2015
... life geography as a case-study of sorts. This is an attempt to explore the time–space dynamics of displacement from the home/family/childhood landscape—the absences that that brings, recollections and revisitations, and accompanying feelings of grief and confusion. To achieve the above a number of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 129–149.
Published: 01 May 2018
... anesthetize its adherents to their intimate relations to and entanglements with other kinds of life. The contestable perspective I advance here holds that how we think exerts a strong influence on both how and what we feel and thus that less anthropocentric understandings of the human and its relations to...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 69–93.
Published: 01 May 2014
... audience had seen the piece before, and while everyone welcomed the number, no one appeared overwhelmed. Because Uranium is normally performed for a live audience, in the following I take subjective license to provoke in words some of the mood, feeling, and emotions percipients 8 may experience...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 149–170.
Published: 01 May 2014
... world to know and feel something at the end of the day that we didn't when we crawled, leapt or groaned our way out of bed that morning. 19 While Butler's work is predominantly human-oriented, her arguments about vulnerability need not be limited to the human. 20 We can recognize that...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 172–195.
Published: 01 November 2016
... yet, the climatic events taking place outside our front door? Music is no alternative to environmental activism or climate science or direct exposure to melting ice caps, rising seas, and cataclysmic winds, but it can compose climate-change sensations that directly affect our listening, feeling, and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 295–300.
Published: 01 May 2014
... hopes to a particular figure, Jesus Christ, Derrida's notion of messianicity is “without content.” He instead celebrates a universal structure of feeling that works independently of any specific historical moment or cultural location: “the universal, quasi-transcendental structure that I call...