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extraction

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 52–71.
Published: 01 May 2019
... two weeks, Roy describes their armed struggle to a global English audience. Exploring Roy’s role both as an itinerant narrator and a global cultural mediator, the author argues that descriptive accounts of travel through contested zones of extraction can foster a vocabulary of resistance that the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 18–39.
Published: 01 May 2017
... plantations and bustling tourist town. In many ways, Darjeeling is what Val Plumwood calls a “shadow place.” Shadow places are sites of extraction, invisible to centers of political and economic power yet essential to the global circulation of capital. The existence of shadow places troubles the notion that...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 73–102.
Published: 01 May 2015
... invisible losses of extractive approaches to knowledge production, particularly in the context of collection-based biodiversity conservation. 1 Copyright: © Svensson 2015 2015 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons License (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). This license...
Image
Published: 01 November 2016
Figure 4. An otolith cross-section that has been placed under magnification. The holes mark where samples for isotope analysis have been extracted with a laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Courtesy of Rachel Johnson, NOAA Fisheries Figure 4. An otolith More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 152–173.
Published: 01 May 2019
... further theorization of toxic materials and toxic embodiment. Having been extracted from the earth, asbestos has fostered mining towns and insulation materials, triggered illnesses and removal techniques, traversed inside our homes and inside our lungs, and breached the boundaries of bodies and cells...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 398–417.
Published: 01 November 2017
... led to new forms of biocapital 34 that depend upon a “form of extraction that involves isolating and mobilizing the primary reproductive agency of specific body parts, particularly cells.” 35 The circuits through which marine microbes are made meaningful and fashioned as currency for...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 159–165.
Published: 01 May 2015
... (like desertification, or clear cutting, or, or, ...). 2 This is kin to the World-Ecology Research Network coordinator Jason Moore's arguments that cheap nature is at an end; cheapening nature cannot work much longer to sustain extraction and production in and of the contemporary world because most...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 95–117.
Published: 01 May 2016
... read the ongoing dynamics of Northern resource extraction and capitalist modernization through the figure of sacrifice. 11 If extractive resource capitalism is a sort of ontological machine 12 —an engine that continuously remakes the world and its entities as already-given, in ways that facilitate...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 3–26.
Published: 01 May 2019
... of Clearwater Creek. Formerly denuded by extractive logging and later further trampled by the running of hogs, Clearwater Creek is a scarred space—like its kindred Appalachian hills beyond—and the (by-)product of an economy of abandonment. 3 At once an illegible, 4 out-of-the-way place, 5...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 265–270.
Published: 01 May 2016
... of primitive accumulation, 23 a process that is not merely one of the past but is ongoing, crucial to the proliferation of an apparatus that seeks to turn all of the world into commodities, extracting surplus from labour without mercy. But seizure of the animal body is primitive accumulation as...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 107–128.
Published: 01 May 2018
... is focused on reducing the quantity of nutrients that flow off the landscape as a result of extractive agricultural practices, deforestation, resource depletion, and other forms of ecological violence. 4 While there has been some success at reducing nutrient pollution loads, I argue that the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 171–194.
Published: 01 May 2014
... formerly concentrated in the grape skins which form a floating “cap” atop the fermenting juice have been extracted over ten days of fermentation, and the cap is turning slightly grey. Yet the fluid in the tank below us still looks paler and more watery than a marketable Pinot Noir wine should. But this is...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 149–171.
Published: 01 November 2016
...Figure 4. An otolith cross-section that has been placed under magnification. The holes mark where samples for isotope analysis have been extracted with a laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Courtesy of Rachel Johnson, NOAA Fisheries Figure 4. An otolith...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 63–85.
Published: 01 May 2018
... sides of the island engage in oil/gas extraction, ranching, forestry, tourism, fisheries, and peat harvesting, the economic impact of these activities is uneven. Figure 2. Map of Tierra del Fuego, modified from NordNordWest/Wikipedia. See original map at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 359–377.
Published: 01 November 2017
... dioxide—in exchange for vitality. To be sure, this intimacy was not of a purely harmless ilk—ultimately, these transactions were extractive in nature. Yet there was reciprocity in this extraction, a manifestation of what Isabelle Stengers calls the “reciprocal capture” of symbiosis: the sustained mutual...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 213–225.
Published: 01 May 2018
... action, whereby distant temporal registers are brought close, and the long-term harm to the landscape caused by mineral extraction is rendered present. In this view, deep time is domesticated not by diffusing violence but through singing about the rupture whereby the “vastness of time” is made present...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 1–27.
Published: 01 May 2015
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 77–100.
Published: 01 May 2014
... optimism of Icelandic environmental policies and in the current hopes in the far North of large international investments in resource extraction. Old ideas and myths are reactivated and negotiated as possible futures are discussed, as hopes associated with the wealthy North and the utopian North are...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 219–225.
Published: 01 May 2016
... interested in what its two authors were up to. 1 I wrote a long and favourable review out of which they extracted a piece which they titled “love your monsters” for what was going to be the Breakthrough Journal. 2 I had compared the reactions of many people, from the left as well as from the right...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 256–262.
Published: 01 November 2016
... forests into extractive and enclosed plantations, relying on slave labor and other forms of exploited, alienated and usually spatially transported labor” (162n5)—but he does discuss exploitation of the earth and the vulnerable more generally (§§4, 27, 67, 106, 123, 230). 13. Boff, Ecology and...