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evolution

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 215–234.
Published: 01 November 2016
...Paul Gillen Abstract Mineral evolution (ME) is a geologic paradigm postulating that Earth’s minerals formed sequentially and have interacted with life forms for billions of years. The evolution of Earth and its minerals is therefore entangled with the evolution of life. This “Provocation” ponders...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 273–294.
Published: 01 May 2018
... of massive magma extrusions about 1.9 billion years ago linked to the ascendance of multicellular life; volcanism present in the East African Rift during pivotal phases of human evolution; and the volcanic activity of the early-mid Holocene viewed as a contextual factor in the emergence of ancient...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 433–453.
Published: 01 November 2017
... of socialization. What we need is a cognitive-semiotic approach to the extent, distribution, and evolution of extraterrestrial intelligence. The three variables f i · f c · L concern how an extraterrestrial biosphere evolves cognitively flexible organisms that, through a biocultural coevolution...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 255–279.
Published: 01 November 2017
... and locating ourselves in the place of others, sympathy read alongside machinic evolution suggests a new approach to the ecological disaster of species extinction. © 2017 Susan Ballard 2017 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 454–455.
Published: 01 November 2017
..., and their colleagues reflected on the possibilities of colonization in space and the likely consequences for human evolution. As we see in the essays presented here, anthropology and related disciplines, environmental studies, and the humanities have come a long way, moving from narrow Cold War...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 265–270.
Published: 01 May 2016
... direction, a bloc of becoming, an a-parallel evolution ... To encounter is to find, to capture, to steal. —Deleuze Dialogues II 1 Encounters are becomings, nuptials. They are movements, lines, flows of differing speeds and durations. An encounter poses problems; it reconfigures identities, space...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 59–88.
Published: 01 May 2016
... the University College London, founded the journal Biometrika. 15 In the first issue, Weldon and Pearson explained that while the starting point of Darwin's theories was the existence of variation among individuals of a species, variation could not be “an effective factor in evolution” unless it...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 447–472.
Published: 01 November 2018
... Ingold’s account of the privileging of the use of the hands in conjunction with the brain in evolutionary thought, they were intensely fraught efforts to adapt the thesis of human exceptionality to the explicitly secular thinking of evolutionism. 106 As Peter Bowler has pointed out, nineteenth...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 301–305.
Published: 01 May 2014
... . “ Biopolitics and the Molecularization of Life .” Cultural Geographies 14 , no. 6 ( 2007 ): 6 - 28 . Ewald Paul W. “ Transmission Modes and the Evolution of Virulence .” Human Nature 2 , no. 1 ( 1991 ): 1 - 30 . Hoffman Daniel , and Moran Mary . “ Introduction: Ebola In...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 277–284.
Published: 01 November 2016
... great age of nature as it is the great age of the human, and that paradox has important implications: Human beings, even if we postulate a process of evolution, also possess a uniqueness which cannot be fully explained by the evolution of other open systems. Each of us has his or her own personal...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 53–71.
Published: 01 May 2015
..., producing an anxious semiotics in which even positive associations can have portentous or uncertain implications. My argument progresses from recent claims made by Bernie Krause about the evolution of soundscapes and their disruption by humans to a series of narratives contributed to the Listening to...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 240–244.
Published: 01 November 2016
... future-making performance of multispecies relationships, including consideration of species evolution in terms of nature’s invention and creativity. 13 This also forces an exploration of how various futures are situated and the politics of their locations. 14 We are being asked to engage with...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 174–179.
Published: 01 May 2019
... Phytoestrogens, abundant in many of the plants we eat, are also estrogen mimics; however, they are familiar antagonists in the long history of evolution—they are a defense mechanism against grazing. 3 Plant estrogens lack the unprecedented potency of emerging chemicals such as phthalates. 4 Phthalates are...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 May 2012
... Margaret . Santa Fe: NM : SAR Press , 2003 . Hird Myra J. The Origins of Sociable Life: Evolution After Science Studies . Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan , 2009 . Kirby Vicki . Quantum Anthropologies: Life at Large . Durham, N.C. : Duke University Press , 2011...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 129–149.
Published: 01 May 2018
... indiscernibility” between them. 49 His idea is that one receives such influence as enrichment—as an added capacity, a new power for action in the future. Further, as we saw in the context of evolution, sometimes this zone of mutual influencing takes on, or rather gives birth to, a life of its own: the lichen...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 1–40.
Published: 01 May 2016
... is listed under the AISR as a category 2 ‘invasive’ requiring control, it enjoys exceptions relating to commercial activity. 83 Secondly, the list approach is challenged by the dynamic co-evolution of ecological behaviour and human interpretation of species designated IAS through space and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 21–41.
Published: 01 May 2013
... the tick is constitutive of the meadow's ecological community, she is a denizen of a world that does not exist only on one plane but is materially patterned in all these senses—apparently, effectively, meaningfully, phenomenally—gathered together, inextricably singular and plural. Evolution then...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 291–294.
Published: 01 May 2014
... not make one small; it peppers its partners with attachment sites for world making” 8 —draws us out into complex interwoven histories of co-evolution and broader patterns of co-becoming, of ranching and the emergence of agriculture, of animal testing, contemporary pet keeping and much more. 9...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 307–311.
Published: 01 May 2014
... and their environments are “mutually unfolded and enfolded structures” 4 and are each recomposed in and through their exchanges. Moreover, our collecting institutions' interpretative grids could be calibrated to the ways that “evolution demonstrates the mutability and malleability of biology as...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 259–263.
Published: 01 May 2016
... symbiosis (at the cellular level) is a more important driver of evolution than competition between distinct units: Lyn Margulis and Dorion Sagan, Acquiring Genomes: A Theory of the Origins of Species (New York: Basic Books, 2003). There is a contradiction in trying to preserve species purity while also...