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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 155–170.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Tobias Boes Abstract This article examines the hermeneutic and poetic operations by which we as human beings turn our very planet into a signifier for our collective existence as a species, a process which I refer to as “planetary mediation.” I identify the so-called Whole Earth images first...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 149–171.
Published: 01 November 2016
... claim that in the Anthropocene, humans have become a geologic force. At the same time, it opens up a down-to-earth form of geopolitics that exceeds classic notions of the term, attending to different geologic scales; to living bodies, human and nonhuman; to solid rock; and to the planet. We develop our...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 291–297.
Published: 01 November 2016
..., Inti Yaya (Father Sun), Pacha Mama (Mother Earth), and mountain deities such as Ausangate and Quilish are increasingly being invoked, not only in relation to local ecological conflicts involving indigenous groups but even during the inauguration of presidents and in the wording of laws and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 325–340.
Published: 01 November 2017
...Lisa Messeri Abstract Astronomers searching for an Earth-like planet elsewhere in our galaxy imagine the significance of such a discovery. They tell each other a story about pointing to the star around which such an exoplanet exists and knowing with certainty that there is a world upon which humans...
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 1. Earth (the yellow part is the dayside of the globe) and its geocorona (in red). Camera operated by astronaut John W. Young. Figure 1. Earth (the yellow part is the dayside of the globe) and its geocorona (in red). Camera operated by astronaut John W. Young. More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 3. Earth in the Martian sky. Image taken by NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity at the Dingo Gap inside Gale Crater on January 31, 2014, showing Earth and its moon. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/TAMU. Figure 3. Earth in the Martian sky. Image taken by NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity at the Dingo More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 1. Earth (the yellow part is the dayside of the globe) and its geocorona (in red). Camera operated by astronaut John W. Young. Figure 1. Earth (the yellow part is the dayside of the globe) and its geocorona (in red). Camera operated by astronaut John W. Young. More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 3. Earth in the Martian sky. Image taken by NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity at the Dingo Gap inside Gale Crater on January 31, 2014, showing Earth and its moon. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/TAMU. Figure 3. Earth in the Martian sky. Image taken by NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity at the Dingo More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 1. Earth (the yellow part is the dayside of the globe) and its geocorona (in red). Camera operated by astronaut John W. Young. Figure 1. Earth (the yellow part is the dayside of the globe) and its geocorona (in red). Camera operated by astronaut John W. Young. More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 3. Earth in the Martian sky. Image taken by NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity at the Dingo Gap inside Gale Crater on January 31, 2014, showing Earth and its moon. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/TAMU. Figure 3. Earth in the Martian sky. Image taken by NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity at the Dingo More
Image
Published: 01 May 2014
Figure 6 The characteristic time scales of some key processes in the Earth system: atmospheric composition (blue), climate system (red), ecological system (green), and socio-economic system (purple). Image courtesy of the IPCC, Third Assessment Report, Figure 5.1. 42 Figure 6. The More
Image
Published: 01 May 2016
Figure 1. The OSE compressed earth brick press creates bricks with high thermal mass from raw soil for use in passive solar construction. Image courtesy of Open Source Ecology (CC-BY-SA). Figure 1. The OSE compressed earth brick press creates bricks with high thermal mass from raw soil for More
Image
Published: 01 May 2014
Figure 2 Mother Earth. Landart by the Icelandic Love Corporation (ILC), 2005. (Photo: © ILC, published with the kind permission of the artists). Figure 2. Mother Earth. Landart by the Icelandic Love Corporation (ILC), 2005. (Photo: © ILC, published with the kind permission of the artists). More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 215–234.
Published: 01 November 2016
...Paul Gillen Abstract Mineral evolution (ME) is a geologic paradigm postulating that Earth’s minerals formed sequentially and have interacted with life forms for billions of years. The evolution of Earth and its minerals is therefore entangled with the evolution of life. This “Provocation” ponders...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 85–102.
Published: 01 May 2012
... focus on a traditional element (earth, water, air) in order to explore its co-constitution with the human, treating the element as active, or, in Jane Bennett's term, “vibrant matter.” In the Anthropocene, it is no longer an “intentional fallacy” to attribute human emotions to the environment or its...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 171–201.
Published: 01 May 2014
... Haraway, as well as historical evidence from the U.N. Environmental Summit in Stockholm in 1972, the essay explores how the attempt to depict Anthropos as a unitary geophysical agent resurrects the appeal to the Whole Earth environmentalism of the 1970s without attending to the U.S. imperialist and racist...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 147–167.
Published: 01 May 2013
... history? Our response follows two main lines of thought. The first relates to the concept of the ‘Anthropocene’ and the possibilities that it offers historians to reconsider their subject in the light of what earth science is saying about earth history and our particularly recent role in its shaping. From...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 40–59.
Published: 01 May 2017
... sea. Meanwhile, earthworms active in the “artificial earth” of the reclamation undermine and bury objects such as lost coins and cigarette butts, causing them to subside into the earth at a rate of a few millimeters a year. Haunting the essay are the specters of rising and falling sea levels and my...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 273–294.
Published: 01 May 2018
... facility is now being set up to explore energy generation and other possibilities of closer engagement with magma. We take this event as an incitement to explore how the Earth-changing “violence” of volcanic or igneous processes might be seen not simply as happening in time but as both generative and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 181–203.
Published: 01 November 2017
...Alessandro Antonello; Mark Carey Abstract Ice cores from Antarctica, Greenland, and the high-mountain cryosphere have become essential sources of evidence on the climate dating back nearly 800,000 years. Earth scientists use ice cores to understand the chemical composition of the atmosphere, which...