1-20 of 100 Search Results for

deep time

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 257–272.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Richard D. G. Irvine Abstract What does it mean to do violence in deep time? How is deep time evoked in our understanding of environmental harm? Environmental transformations have figured prominently in the recent history of Mongolia. Shifts in land use have been associated with severe pasture...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 226–240.
Published: 01 May 2018
.... The idea that a never-before-witnessed event is unprecedented calls into question the shallow temporal frames through which deep time environmental phenomena are understood in Australian settler culture and offers an insight into often unnoticed ways in which contemporary society struggles with the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 213–225.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Franklin Ginn; Michelle Bastian; David Farrier; Jeremy Kidwell Abstract The fractured timespace of the Anthropocene brings distant pasts and futures into the present. Thinking about deep time is challenging: deep time is strange and warps our sense of belonging and our relationships to Earth forces...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 295–309.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Jonathan Woolley Abstract Drawing in nightmares, shadows, and loneliness, this article follows a rarely trodden and difficult path across the shifting geology of Norfolk, a track marked by fleeting glimpses and horrible signs of the deadly consequences of deep time and human choice. A subject of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 241–256.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Alan Macpherson Abstract The objective of this article is to think through the concepts of deep time and enchantment with Caroline Wendling’s White Wood (2014), a living artwork in northeast Scotland. The first part of the article establishes the relationship between deep time, ecology, and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 310–329.
Published: 01 May 2018
... witness as being haunted by the legacy of one’s actions into deep time. Notwithstanding its critical reception among certain philosophers, a confessing tone may become increasingly pertinent to activists, artists, and faith communities making sense of humanity’s ethical commitments in deep time. © 2018...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 217–232.
Published: 01 May 2014
... Salgado's Genesis (2013), a monumental collection of photographs that promises a journey “to the beginnings of our planet,” confronting the viewer with the dimension of geological time into which human agency has expanded. Due to the indexicality of photography, the Genesis -project has to approach deep...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 1–18.
Published: 01 May 2014
...David Farrier Abstract This article argues that the Anthropocene is marked by haunted time. As the ‘geological agents’ of climate change, as Dipesh Chakrabarty has put it, we both identify with ‘deep time’ processes and conjure the ghosts of those whose lives to come will be shaped in drastic ways...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 181–203.
Published: 01 November 2017
.... © 2017 Alessandro Antonello and Mark Carey 2017 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). ice cores ice cryosphere temporalities deep time polar regions In June 2004, the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 273–294.
Published: 01 May 2018
.... That we experience eventful time as erupting, irrupting, interrupting suggests memories of those ruptures that our planet delivers now and again. “Earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, and droughts,” notes geologist Robert Frodeman, “are places where deep time erupts into our more familiar rhythms”: 2...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 1–11.
Published: 01 May 2014
... pursuit of seeing everything, the more our sense of a deep, rich, coherent world will appear unavailable: it will seem to have faded into the past (nostalgia) or to belong only to others (primitivism). 9 In time-lapse images, the literal ground disappears most radically because mundane (pre...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 118–142.
Published: 01 May 2016
... care in times of death and loss: at places of confinement and elephant suffering like the zoos in Seattle and Zürich as well as in the conflict-ridden landscapes of South India, where the country’s last free-ranging elephants live. Our stories of deadly viral-elephant-human becomings remind us that...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 35–53.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Susanna Lidström; Greg Garrard Abstract This paper discusses the idea of ‘ecopoetry’ by outlining its development from drawing on Romantic and deep ecological traditions in the 1980s to reflecting complex environmental concerns in the 2010s. We identify a distinction between definitions that focus...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 149–171.
Published: 01 November 2016
... scale. They attend to the intertwinings of bodies and biographies with earth systems and deep time histories. Because we insist that geosocialities are “embodied” and “down to earth,” we approach them ethnographically. We offer two different entry points, based on the geosocial entanglements of the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 1–27.
Published: 01 May 2015
... damaged the back of the house. This was one of the many farm and family “legends” that were told and retold around the table at meal times. Deep in the fields there was a remnant of a green lane hinting of an ancient droveway through the moors. There were orchids and kingcups in the grips 46 of the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 7–21.
Published: 01 May 2012
...—industry and agribusiness are quite evidently the culprits. It is rather that the conditions of possibility for industry and agribusiness—whether they are Soviet or capitalist in their economic form—are the deep background for the emergency in which we now find ourselves. Such deep time thinking is...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 215–234.
Published: 01 November 2016
... contributions to scientific knowledge. Geologists established the immense age of Earth, and Alfred Wegener’s discovery of continental drift turned out to be essential for understanding the deep-time circulation of carbon at and near Earth’s surface. 1 The term Anthropocene , which in recent years has come...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 398–417.
Published: 01 November 2017
... extremophile organisms are made part of a market-driven search for bioactive components in areas highly sensitive to geopolitics at the same time as they become meaningful as proxies for extraterrestrial life. The article combines analysis, description, and fieldwork material, tracing the relational...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 40–59.
Published: 01 May 2017
... the past of deep time or of more recent times. These physical traces are always narrated in the present, according to the perceptions, concerns, and discourses of the present. Archaeology attends closely to their materiality—their formal-stylistic attributes, marks of use and modes of decay, craft and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 93–109.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Deborah Bird Rose Abstract Towards the end of her eventful and productive life, Val Plumwood was turning toward Indigenous people and cultures as a way of encountering the lived experience of ideas she was working with theoretically. At the same time, she was defining herself as a philosophical...