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climate trauma

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 May 2018
... particular lives and wider ecologies. It works on ecologies and bodies alike as a kind of wounding, one not simply or solely to the everyday stuff of biological life but to the very constitution of experience and expression. Critiquing and extending writing on climate, trauma, and aesthetic experience by E...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 123–140.
Published: 01 May 2012
... explored in two contemporary environmental writers. First, The End of Nature by Bill McKibben is examined for its debt to Silent Spring and its use (and overuse) of sadness in its attempt to bring climate change to the public's attention. Second, Early Spring by Amy Seidl is shown to be a more affective...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 310–329.
Published: 01 May 2018
... of a blind spot in the representation of futures. 9 It can be useful to think about this in terms of a social, collective experience of trauma, in which the very anticipation of the (far future) legacy of one’s actions, whether from accidents, leakages, or other disasters performs a kind of social...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 226–240.
Published: 01 May 2018
... counterintuitively, enchanted. Research initiated in the years following the fire has tracked two primary themes: the complex science of large-scale fire events (including risk mitigation) and the human story of disaster-related trauma. Little attention has been given to the deep time context underlying the fire...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 149–171.
Published: 01 November 2016
... Climate change has taken up the position of the volcano in the living room. It points to how dangerous geologic intimacies have long been in the houses and factories of Europeans—in the glowing red coal fires entangled with industrial capitalism and “modern” life. But while everyone noticed how coal...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 255–279.
Published: 01 November 2017
... people away from their everyday labors. 27 For the contemporary audience the art gallery is both an escape (from the “real” life urgency of anthropogenic climate change and the trauma of species extinction) and a space within which these traumas can be critically experienced and thought through. We...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 95–117.
Published: 01 May 2016
..., trauma, and war. 79 The landscapes of Kvalsund overflow with relational imaginaries, each in its own way a challenge to the dominant ontologies that threaten to eclipse them. These imaginaries converge with particular force in the context of human interventions, present and prospective. “This is hell...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 169–190.
Published: 01 May 2016
... teachers) a “flash point” of colonial trauma. 60 In this section, we examine how these deaths occurred as part of a governance strategy aimed at changing Inuit relationships with the environment, which in the process identified sled dogs as a kind of dangerous waste. The decision was enabled, at least...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 152–173.
Published: 01 May 2019
... “cellular responses to an unexpected trauma, and a normal repair mechanism [is] the deposition of a fibrous protein, collagen, in excessive concentrations at the site of trauma,” which can result in mesothelioma, a cancer of the lining of the lungs from asbestos inhalation, which usually arises out of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 111–127.
Published: 01 May 2013
..., the Euro-American middle class linked good taste to refinement and masculine-coded behaviors of self-discipline, moderation, and an educated and cultured palate. Today, this cultured engagement requires an awareness of the ways in which meat connects to issues of health, environment, climate change...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 1–20.
Published: 01 May 2013
... disintegration in the late 1970s over the division of its patriarch's estate and subsequent revelations of sexual abuse had spawned a rich critical apparatus inquisitive of the novel's treatment of gender, violence and trauma, adaptation, and human and ecological interpenetrations. 2 This uncanny moment...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 131–157.
Published: 01 May 2015
... activists who were eager to learn about the camps, entailed a lot of cleanup work at the cemetery. The bitter cold—it was the coldest day of the year—“humbled” the younger generation and reminded those who'd lived in the camps of the valley's harsh climate. 76 In interviews archived on densho.org...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 118–142.
Published: 01 May 2016
... species. During our fieldwork, biologists and people working and intimately dwelling with elephants at the forest boundary identified violent encounters with humans as a primary cause of stress for elephants. In South India, older members of a herd remember and embody the trauma of ivory poaching and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 71–91.
Published: 01 May 2013
... voices within environmental politics begin with the urgent demand to ‘protect’ a finite planet. In his article ‘Two Faces of the Apocalypse’, Michael Hardt describes the difference between anti-capitalist activists and climate change activists at the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP 15) in...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 69–93.
Published: 01 May 2014
... entertainers] don't need to destroy [themselves], dig everything up, have all this emotional trauma [in order to successfully transmit emotion] ... Having all this emotion [or trying not to] as a human on stage in front of people reads as something. Whereas a lump of clay will never read as hollow, cold and...