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climate control

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 60–83.
Published: 01 May 2017
... attempts at climate control are not consistent with a desire to control the elements, I argue instead that Eliasson’s environments are fully orchestrated affairs that share the technologies and efforts of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries’ militarization of climate control. Their phenomenological...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 May 2018
... missiles, whereas halting or even slowing catastrophic climate change may yet prove outside human control. Cultural practices that respond to trauma, particularly on the collective level, tend to look backward to the past. In memorial culture, for example, “collective trauma pushes and prods the social...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 147–167.
Published: 01 May 2013
.... Independent bodies such as the Royal Society are likely to be drawn in to give endorsement to such representative projects of high-Modernity, on the one hand, the most brazen examples of technical fix yet devised “to take control of the climate”, on the other. 48 There is no reason why historians—alongside...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 330–337.
Published: 01 May 2018
.... In our contemporary understanding of climate change, where be dragons? Although dragons are today conspicuous by their absence, it is increasingly clear that they lie all around: at the interstices of academic disciplines, beyond the boundaries of falsifiable scientific knowledge, in the sheer...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 1–11.
Published: 01 May 2014
... a scientist-turned-landscape photographer for National Geographic. While on an assignment to photograph ice in 2006, he came up with the idea to use time-lapse photography of receding glaciers as evidence of climate change. The resulting Extreme Ice Survey project, sponsored by The Wild Foundation...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 13–33.
Published: 01 May 2014
... future world imaginings of the SRES graph. Although the climate inertia graph does reveal how we are locked into a future dictated by today's and yesterday's emissions, today's emissions are still controllable. We can, this graph demonstrates, create the future worlds that were only imagined in the SRES...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 41–58.
Published: 01 May 2016
... usually assumed, but rather his advocacy for enclosing the commons only makes sense when read as a plea for greater public control over scarce and unowned resources under conditions in which these resources are exploited by the laws of market economics. Yet even if the most sensible and even-handed...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 473–500.
Published: 01 November 2018
...Matthew Schneider-Mayerson Abstract Climate fiction—literature explicitly focused on climate change—has exploded over the last decade, and is often assumed to have a positive ecopolitical influence by enabling readers to imagine potential climate futures and persuading them of the gravity and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 181–203.
Published: 01 November 2017
... to the contrary, they are shaped primarily by climate. A 2013 Mother Jones article does allow people to do something in the future to prevent catastrophe, but their only action is to control climate. The article concludes that Greenland is melting very fast, and cities like Hamburg, Shanghai, and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 72–100.
Published: 01 May 2019
... the problems that motivated the creation of the analytic in the first place: convincing lay individuals to actively respond to anthropogenic environmental change. Climate change denial persists, even within the rural and agricultural communities most affected by these environmental changes. These same...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 89–105.
Published: 01 May 2016
... environmental salvation. However, these areas are also home to contaminated biota that migrate beyond refuge boundaries, inspiring biological vector control campaigns that frame nuclear nature as a threat that must be contained. How can these environments simultaneously embody ruin and redemption, and what work...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 101–123.
Published: 01 May 2014
... it is impossible to know beforehand the complex environmental consequences of geoengineering. If living a full-scale experiment is the only way to gain reasonable control over the large-scale deployment of geoengineering and the climate, 83 the value of geoengineering as insurance against...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 1–40.
Published: 01 May 2016
... environmental change that inflict ‘slow violence’ on vulnerable human (and non-human) populations. Nixon argues that a lack of “arresting stories, images and symbols” reduces the visibility of gradual problems such as biodiversity loss, climate change and chemical pollution in cultural imaginations and on...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 203–216.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Alexa Weik von Mossner Abstract Covering the time span from 2021 to 16000 N.C., Dale Pendell's speculative novel The Great Bay chronicles the profound climatic, geological and ecological transformations that California undergoes during these fourteen millennia. Human life becomes unimaginably small...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 85–102.
Published: 01 May 2012
... poems create a confusion of subject/object and foreground/background relations in which the origins of affects are impossible to determine and harms circulate. Affect is vital in understanding human motivations in relation to climate change, and Hillman's ecopoetic practice is an example of how we can...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 123–140.
Published: 01 May 2012
... explored in two contemporary environmental writers. First, The End of Nature by Bill McKibben is examined for its debt to Silent Spring and its use (and overuse) of sadness in its attempt to bring climate change to the public's attention. Second, Early Spring by Amy Seidl is shown to be a more affective...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 118–142.
Published: 01 May 2016
... neither human care, love, and attentiveness nor techniques of control and creative management are sufficient to fully secure elephant survival. The article introduces the concept of “viral creep” to explore the ability of a creeping, only partially knowable virus to rearrange relations among people...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 215–234.
Published: 01 November 2016
... process. However, the control that our conscious agency can exercise upon planetary transformation is very limited even over human time scales, let alone geologic ones. Copyright © 2016 Paul Gillen 2016 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 169–190.
Published: 01 May 2016
... adopts a ‘zero tolerance’ approach to trash animals. These culturally sanctioned (and publicly funded) facilities practice diverse methods of ‘vermin control.’ By contrast, within Inuit communities of the Eastern Canadian Arctic, ravens eat, play, and rest on open dumps by the thousands. In this article...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 280–299.
Published: 01 November 2017
... methods of gene sequencing, cannot be archived or copied like texts, and the impulse to do so reflects imperialist efforts to appropriate and control knowledge, as several empires attempted to do at Alexandria during the library’s long history. The metaphor of a species as a book, represented in the...