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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 13–33.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Elizabeth Callaway Abstract This article turns toward scientific literature to consider the basic strategies used in presenting the temporality of climate change. While the majority of literary criticism argues that the experience of climate change is either apocalyptic or banal, the scientific...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 1–11.
Published: 01 May 2014
... a scientist-turned-landscape photographer for National Geographic. While on an assignment to photograph ice in 2006, he came up with the idea to use time-lapse photography of receding glaciers as evidence of climate change. The resulting Extreme Ice Survey project, sponsored by The Wild Foundation...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 175–178.
Published: 01 May 2015
... transformed. Climate is an enduring idea and also a powerful one; and, like any interesting word, it defies easy definition. The idea of climate today is most commonly associated with the discourse of climate change and its scientific, political, economic, religious, ethical and social dimensions. I have...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 41–58.
Published: 01 May 2016
... considered in light of contemporary climate change and the political obstacles that have hindered attempts to make significant decreases in global carbon emissions. In the second section of this article, then, I argue that shifting the interpretive focus of Hardin's argument away from the predominant object...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 147–167.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Mark Levene Abstract The accumulating evidence on the depth and accelerating trajectory of anthropogenic climate change poses the possibility of an early end to human existence as part of a more general biotic extinction. But if that is the case what does that mean for the latter day writing of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 172–195.
Published: 01 November 2016
...Dianne Chisholm Abstract How does contemporary music cultivate ecological thinking and climate-change awareness in our era of global warming? This essay investigates how the music of Pulitzer Prize–winning Alaskan composer John Luther Adams incites ecological listening and shapes an ear for climate...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 60–83.
Published: 01 May 2017
... attempts at climate control are not consistent with a desire to control the elements, I argue instead that Eliasson’s environments are fully orchestrated affairs that share the technologies and efforts of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries’ militarization of climate control. Their phenomenological...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 473–500.
Published: 01 November 2018
...Matthew Schneider-Mayerson Abstract Climate fiction—literature explicitly focused on climate change—has exploded over the last decade, and is often assumed to have a positive ecopolitical influence by enabling readers to imagine potential climate futures and persuading them of the gravity and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 330–337.
Published: 01 May 2018
.... In our contemporary understanding of climate change, where be dragons? Although dragons are today conspicuous by their absence, it is increasingly clear that they lie all around: at the interstices of academic disciplines, beyond the boundaries of falsifiable scientific knowledge, in the sheer...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Michael Richardson Abstract The climate catastrophe to come is traumatically affecting, whether in its micro and macro manifestations, in the threat it poses to existing ways of life, in its upending of entrenched understandings of the workings of the world, or in the injury it is doing to...
Image
Published: 01 May 2016
Figure 4. Yoko Shimizu, illustration for Michael Cockram, “Bracing for Climate Change,” Green Source Magazine, January/February 2013. Copyright Yoko Shimizu http://yukoart.com/blog/climate-change-and-the-city , blog entry, February 11, 2013. Reproduced with Permission. Figure 4. Yoko More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 181–203.
Published: 01 November 2017
...Alessandro Antonello; Mark Carey Abstract Ice cores from Antarctica, Greenland, and the high-mountain cryosphere have become essential sources of evidence on the climate dating back nearly 800,000 years. Earth scientists use ice cores to understand the chemical composition of the atmosphere, which...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 418–432.
Published: 01 November 2017
... Antarctica, I will compare the paramilitary practicalities of Antarctic research station and field camp life with the visions of the Antarctic as a place of sublime wild nature, violent death, and climate disaster. Using three signature events in Antarctic field training—predeparture, orientation, and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 72–100.
Published: 01 May 2019
... the problems that motivated the creation of the analytic in the first place: convincing lay individuals to actively respond to anthropogenic environmental change. Climate change denial persists, even within the rural and agricultural communities most affected by these environmental changes. These same...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 123–140.
Published: 01 May 2012
... explored in two contemporary environmental writers. First, The End of Nature by Bill McKibben is examined for its debt to Silent Spring and its use (and overuse) of sadness in its attempt to bring climate change to the public's attention. Second, Early Spring by Amy Seidl is shown to be a more affective...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 101–123.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Jonas Anshelm; Anders Hansson Abstract Geoengineering, i.e., the deliberate manipulation of the global climate using grand-scale technologies, poses new challenges in terms of environmental risks and human–nature relationships. Until recently, these technologies were considered science fiction, but...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 85–102.
Published: 01 May 2012
... poems create a confusion of subject/object and foreground/background relations in which the origins of affects are impossible to determine and harms circulate. Affect is vital in understanding human motivations in relation to climate change, and Hillman's ecopoetic practice is an example of how we can...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 155–170.
Published: 01 May 2014
... mediation can now take place only in virtual environments such as those of Google Earth and advanced climate modeling systems. I analyze the work of Soviet biologist Evgeni Shepelev as a starting point for this form of planetary mediation and discuss the multimedia installation The Place Where You Go to...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 203–216.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Alexa Weik von Mossner Abstract Covering the time span from 2021 to 16000 N.C., Dale Pendell's speculative novel The Great Bay chronicles the profound climatic, geological and ecological transformations that California undergoes during these fourteen millennia. Human life becomes unimaginably small...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 1–40.
Published: 01 May 2016
... environmental change that inflict ‘slow violence’ on vulnerable human (and non-human) populations. Nixon argues that a lack of “arresting stories, images and symbols” reduces the visibility of gradual problems such as biodiversity loss, climate change and chemical pollution in cultural imaginations and on...