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centrally planned economies

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 20–39.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Xenia Cherkaev; Elena Tipikina Abstract The image of totalitarianism is central to liberal ideology as the nefarious antithesis of free market exchange: the inevitable outcome of planned economies, which control their subjects’ lives down to the most intimate detail. Against this image of complete...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 3–26.
Published: 01 May 2019
... modernity strive to delimit and disembed—the market from society, production from reproduction, waged work from kin work, value from values—the household remains central to this economy (as its etymological origin oikos suggests). The largely subsistence-oriented farm that Sally operates is a form of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 18–39.
Published: 01 May 2017
... of Nepali laborers but owned by non-Nepalis, remain central to the district’s economy. This article discusses politics of belonging in the afterlife of the hill station. I ask how Nepalis—who still constitute the region’s majority—have worked to make claims to Darjeeling as a homeland. In some...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 77–100.
Published: 01 May 2014
... overlapping crises of the economy, the environment and the collective self-image in Iceland have fostered critical representations of the past, present and future of the relationship between humans and the environment. Thus utilitarian environmental policies and shallow ecology is treated critically in...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 63–85.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Laura A. Ogden Abstract For decades the role of invasive species has been central to discussions of anthropogenic loss and change. Conceptual debates over whether “native” and “invasive” species are useful to our understanding of dynamic processes of world making have significantly challenged...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 23–55.
Published: 01 May 2012
...Eben Kirksey Abstract Bruno Latour has tried to bring a parliamentary democracy to the domain of nature. Wading through the swamps of Palo Verde, a national park in the Guanacaste Province of Costa Rica, and wandering onto neighbouring agricultural lands, I failed to find a central place where...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 195–205.
Published: 01 May 2014
.... Figure 2 Stuffed great auk at Kelvingrove Museum, Glasgow. Image © Mike Pennington. Used under a CC BY-SA 2.0 license. Figure 2. Stuffed great auk at Kelvingrove Museum, Glasgow. Image © Mike Pennington. Used under a CC BY-SA 2.0 license. Great auks feature centrally in museum's efforts to...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 103–121.
Published: 01 May 2012
... village leaders and elders. Several others noted that these interventions would erode sentiment, or good will among neighbours ( mất tình cảm ). Creating and maintaining sentiment is a central organising principle in village moral economies in Việt Nam. The spaces that poultry occupy, and their...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 113–123.
Published: 01 May 2014
... perspective requires us to see nonhumans not always as victims, nor humans (or more accurately geographically and historically specific groups of humans) as perpetrators. Rather, flourishing involves many species knotted together, often imbricated in human landscapes or economy, working with and against other...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 101–123.
Published: 01 May 2014
... identifying central meaning clusters and storylines. The texts were then coded and categorized, though the analytical process entailed ongoing recoding and recategorization. 25 In this way, the examined texts were finally clustered and a coherent discourse emerged that gave meaning to a specific aspect of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 194–215.
Published: 01 May 2019
.... Then, a property tycoon unveiled plans to build a shopping mall. Soon, the project moved to construction but when the excavators struck a source of mineral water, a flow of water submerged the construction site and formed the urban lake now bordering the factory ruins. Around the same time, local...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 95–117.
Published: 01 May 2016
... contexts and explore some of the economies of harm 14 that are in play around it. The argument treats harm as matter for an exploratory ontological determination: what beings exist, such that they can be harmed? The domain of life does not necessarily coincide with, or exhaust, the domain of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 19–39.
Published: 01 May 2014
... women's pumps floating, followed by furniture. That morning, the residents of Kingston, Tennessee, awoke to the reality that the central infrastructural element of the entire town, the Steam Plant, had spilled over 1.1 billion gallons of coal ash waste out of an earthen holding pond and into the river...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 1–20.
Published: 01 May 2013
...-cosmopolitanism—and consequently to underscore the primacy of environmental humanities in enriching environmental discourse. In profound ways, the novel born in this upstate New York McDonalds exemplifies an eco-cosmopolitan narrative, centered on the eco-cosmopolitan consciousness of its central character...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 57–76.
Published: 01 May 2016
... the naked eye. Scientists interested in this microbiome present the human as a superorganism, accommodating, infected, and kept alive by diverse microbes in dynamic ecologies. 2 Once feared as universally pathogenic, microbes are now ascribed central roles in the performance and maintenance of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 330–337.
Published: 01 May 2018
..., centralized—are most desirable? The Planet under Pressure Declaration that established Future Earth called for one integrated knowledge system, serving one overarching goal, to be delivered by a unitary global governance system. But what conceptions of power, knowledge, and epistemic justice are...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 187–212.
Published: 01 May 2018
... Santiago in central Chile, was an isolated rural area whose population lived mainly from artisan fishery and peasant agriculture. In September 1964 the ENAMI copper smelting plant was launched, with the expectation of igniting a new industrial phase in twentieth-century Chile. 1 Nobody predicted an...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 169–190.
Published: 01 May 2016
... left to scavenge on open dumps sites in northern Canada. It is not, we will argue, simply a matter of modern versus outdated waste disposal technologies and practices—although this is a central way in which waste issues in the North are framed by government officials and the media. We will explore the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 69–84.
Published: 01 May 2012
... place, the role of perception is central. Place is ‘created’ by what he calls “sensations”, “sense data” or “impressions”: in short, people make place in some sense out of their lived experience. 11 Anthropologist Tim Ingold, describes the way walking makes place cultural. 12 Fred Myers describes...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 257–272.
Published: 01 May 2018
... shoroo ). Gregory Delaplace argues that authenticity is a central concern of Mongolian rap: exploring what it means to be a “real” Mongol. 16 He suggests that the central question posed by much Mongolian rap is “how to be Mongolian today,” or rather “what is preventing us from being Mongolian...