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catastrophe

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Michael Richardson Abstract The climate catastrophe to come is traumatically affecting, whether in its micro and macro manifestations, in the threat it poses to existing ways of life, in its upending of entrenched understandings of the workings of the world, or in the injury it is doing to...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 418–432.
Published: 01 November 2017
... navigation—I consider how people visiting the Antarctic are trained to order their lives and work, especially in preparation for emergencies. Notions of risk, danger, and catastrophe hinge on the broader historical and cultural contexts of Antarctica as a frontier zone, making preparedness in the Antarctic...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 273–294.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Nigel Clark; Alexandra Gormally; Hugh Tuffen Abstract In 2009, exploratory drilling of geothermal wells in Iceland’s Krafla volcanic caldera unexpectedly struck magma. The fact that the encounter did not have catastrophic consequences has excited considerable interest—and an international research...
Image
Published: 01 May 2012
the original condition of the marsh. Over geological time-scales marshes come and go. The composition of plants in a marsh can change dramatically in much shorter time-scales—decades, years, and, in the wake of catastrophe, days. Figure 5. The rhizome of the cattail51. / The actual living rhizomes More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 203–216.
Published: 01 May 2014
... Risk (2007), “is not synonymous with catastrophe. Risk means the anticipation of the catastrophe. Risks concern the possibility of future occurrences and developments; they make present a state of the world that does not (yet) exist.” 14 This differentiation between risk and catastrophe is...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 233–238.
Published: 01 May 2016
... time periods. Determined to distance the new science from Biblical accounts of instantaneous creation ex nihilo, the emerging profession was reluctant to accept any theory of catastrophism in which a transition from one period in Earth history to the next may be due to some natural paroxysm. In the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 101–123.
Published: 01 May 2014
... and fears as for example a technological fix that saves humanity from climate catastrophe or an overly complex technology that interferes with sensitive and unpredictable Nature. In this paper, we aim to improve our understanding of the public discourse on geoengineering in mass media. We focus on how...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 219–225.
Published: 01 May 2016
..., as if they were living at a time when they alone were in command. I have heard many times the critique of catastrophism, I even heard on the first night a charming lady exclaim “Let's move away from that doomsday mood,” as if catastrophism was a sort of human ideology imposed on a situation that...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 295–300.
Published: 01 May 2014
... transformed. Powerful forces have tried to steal the very idea of hope. 1 As an empty political slogan, “hope” has bulldozed over our dreams. 2 Yet, in the aftermath of disaster—in blasted landscapes that have been transformed by multiple catastrophes—it is still possible to find hope. Looking to...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 213–220.
Published: 01 May 2014
... threat. In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act. —Ian Angus, The Myth of ‘Environmental Catastrophism’ It is only through fundamental change at the center of the system, from which the pressures on the planet principally emanate, that there is any genuine possibility of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 147–167.
Published: 01 May 2013
... catastrophe actually precipitated humanity towards an enhanced problem-solving mindset which enabled them to survive more than 40,000 years of further ice age—the major part of our deep history. The second is that in spite of their techniques and organisation for resilience, and thus the precious existential...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 338–342.
Published: 01 May 2018
... quite an ironic way. Indeed, the absence of humans in this choreography is an ironic homage to the anthropos as a catastrophic planetary agency doomed to bring about its own end. Read as a careful meditation on loss and promise, E-Motions actually disrupts and restructures the familiar Anthropocene...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 460–463.
Published: 01 November 2017
... neither efficient nor beautiful, but as excessive and replete with death. And yet, nature as fecund—in which life is so intimate with death and birth so commensurate with waste—does not legitimize the rampant wastefulness of many human societies, nor does it, more broadly, condemn life only to catastrophe...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 300–308.
Published: 01 November 2017
..., “Orbital Decay”; Degroot, “Catastrophe Happening in Front of Our Very Eyes”; Maher, Apollo in the Age of Aquarius ; and Pritchard, “Trouble with Darkness.” 10. See Denning, “Learning to Read”; and Capova, “Detection of Extraterrestrial Life.” 11. And check out “Breakthrough Listen,” a massive new...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 203–217.
Published: 01 May 2016
... to more general anxieties about catastrophic climate change and to worries about ocean pollution, acidification, and plastification. In such usages, the Wave operates as a synecdoche for, a symbolic capture of, the difficult-to-apprehend vastness of the ever-moving, interconnecting, and possibly...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 175–179.
Published: 01 May 2017
... climate change. 12 Radical changes, even catastrophes, are renamed as normal “regime shifts” to be adapted to, not struggled against by, for example, confronting the dominance of fossil fuel infrastructure and the corporate power of big oil. In this sense, “ecological resiliency is the calculative...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 255–279.
Published: 01 November 2017
... to understand potential environmental catastrophes. The essay ends by suggesting that the art gallery is a sympathetic space in which we can encounter the knowledges of Bergson and Darwin, temper them with the imaginings of Butler, and ground them with the transformative living machines created by...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 181–203.
Published: 01 November 2017
... to reduce global carbon emissions by placing humans into longer Earth histories and by speculating about catastrophic future climate change. Figure 2. In 1987, the results from the Antarctic Vostok ice core clearly demonstrated the close links between atmospheric CO 2 concentrations and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 89–105.
Published: 01 May 2016
... Contamination .” Hanford Reach , 19 October , 1998 . Hamblin Jacob . Arming Mother Nature: The Birth of Catastrophic Environmentalism . Oxford : Oxford University Press , 2013 . Havlick David . “ Logics of Change for Military-to-Wildlife Conversions in the United States .” GeoJournal...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 149–171.
Published: 01 November 2016
... quiescence. 11 When the earth really did move, it indeed shook up what would later be called social theory, such as in 1755, when a catastrophic earthquake struck Lisbon. Discussed extensively by philosopher Immanuel Kant and several contemporary intellectuals, the quake had seismic implications for...