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butterflies

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2022) 14 (2): 438–456.
Published: 01 July 2022
... the necessity of these crossings, the kinship and well-being that movement sustains? The essay explores these questions through a series of meditations on the monarch butterfly, a creature that has become in recent years the symbol of a more expansive vision of North American belonging. Anand Pandian describes...
FIGURES | View All (5)
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Published: 01 July 2022
Figure 3. An individual butterfly among the thousands. Photograph by the author. More
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Published: 01 July 2022
Figure 1. “Butterfly Crossing. Migration is Natural” sign. Photograph by Thomas Hawk. Reproduced under CC BY-NC 2.0 license. More
Image
Published: 01 July 2022
Figure 2. Participants wearing monarch butterfly wings at a rally in Washington, DC. Photograph by the author. More
Image
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 2. Jerusalem artichoke in human vision (left), simulated butterfly vision (middle), and simulated bee vision (right), photographed by Klaus Schmitt. Both butterflies and bees can see into the near-ultraviolet (UV-A). Used with permission. More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2022) 14 (3): 618–640.
Published: 01 November 2022
... the Butterfly Dance , Serpentine Dance , and Lily Dance . During her performances, huge pieces of fabric were twisted and turned around Fuller’s body and light projected onto her dress to create the appearance of a butterfly or flower. Upon realizing her dream of dancing in Paris, Fuller rose to huge...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2024) 16 (1): 211–229.
Published: 01 March 2024
.... Pollinating insects are very diverse, including butterflies, beetles, and even mosquitoes. Pollinators are critical to the maintenance of pollination, a regulating ecosystem service that people depend on for food, fiber, and energy. Scientists estimate pollinating insects are declining at global scales...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2017) 9 (2): 378–397.
Published: 01 November 2017
...Figure 2. Jerusalem artichoke in human vision (left), simulated butterfly vision (middle), and simulated bee vision (right), photographed by Klaus Schmitt. Both butterflies and bees can see into the near-ultraviolet (UV-A). Used with permission. ...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2013) 3 (1): 93–109.
Published: 01 May 2013
... Val died in 2008, and we gave her a green burial at home on her beloved Plumwood Mountain. As we stood around the open cardboard coffin a large butterfly flew amongst us and settled on Val's body. It stayed there long enough for us to feel that the moment was truly significant. Then it took wing...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2018) 10 (2): 473–500.
Published: 01 November 2018
... such as the swell of monarch butterflies in Flight Behavior . These comments support cognitive psychologists’ claims that vivid imagery leads to more narrative engagement and recall. 51 While the possibility of social desirability bias can never be discounted, it should be noted that not all readers found...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2022) 14 (2): 375–384.
Published: 01 July 2022
... shows how wonder remains in the lifeways of the monarch butterfly in its crossing of the border separating the United States and Mexico despite the politics of migration. In 1996 Gisli Pálsson outlined three metaphors for the relationships of human beings to nature: occidentalism (a colonial...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2022) 14 (2): 494–498.
Published: 01 July 2022
... of green, white, and red. But then circle back and walk west along the same fencing, and what you’ll see instead is an image painted in strips onto a different face of these triangular bars, one that reveals a giant monarch butterfly perched upon bright red petals. It’s almost as though this flitting...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2013) 2 (1): 21–41.
Published: 01 May 2013
... worlds ( Umwelten ) of the inhabitants of the meadow such as the field-mouse, earthworm, butterfly or, most notoriously, the tick, “worlds strange to us but known to other creatures, manifold and varied as the animals themselves.” 54 We are asked to think of these worlds as soap bubbles we might step...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2022) 14 (3): 584–589.
Published: 01 November 2022
... frogs); some of these pleasures are performative (serpentine and butterfly dances, pornographically homotopian boys); and many of these pleasures, like Larapinta’s seduction of Kaden, include a combination of all these elements. Astrida Neimanis’s fraught love relationship with Windermere Basin near...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2022) 14 (3): 718–725.
Published: 01 November 2022
... throbbing vitality as envisioned through the exoticizing lens of Austrian gay male sex tourists in the immediate fall of the Iron Curtain. Ferns asexually reproduce. Modern dancer Loïe Fuller’s interpretation of butterfly metamorphosis offers fruitful comparison to sexologist Magnus Hirschfeld’s figuration...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2022) 14 (3): 641–660.
Published: 01 November 2022
..., “Darwin, Marañón, Hirschfeld.” 27. For a premodern history of sexuality in relation to environmental factors, see LaFleur, Natural History . 28. Krafft-Ebing, Psychopathia Sexualis , 1 . 29. Hirschfeld, Homosexuality , 719 . 30. Linge, “Potency of the Butterfly,” 61...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2016) 8 (1): 57–76.
Published: 01 May 2016
.... For an extended discussion of the ethical potential of friendship between humans and nonmammalian animals, see Bingham, “Bees, Butterflies, and Bacteria.” 88. See, for example, Sagan, Cosmic Apprentice . References Allen Judith , and Maizels Rick . “ Diversity and Dialogue in Immunity...
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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2016) 7 (1): 245–254.
Published: 01 May 2016
... wetlands are gone, and the rainforests are falling. What makes it true that no limits to growth exist is that glyphosate is everywhere and almost one billion monarch butterflies are missing; that freshwater biodiversity has suffered massive losses and there seems so little hope for what remains. What makes...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2019) 11 (1): 180–193.
Published: 01 May 2019
... and the dump they abhor. As they rave about the “butterfly effect” adopted from a key figure in chaos theory, Edward Lorenz, 6 and aver that “everything is interconnected,” ecologists destroy much more than the category of causality and predictability with its illusion of control; they harm the fragile...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2014) 4 (1): 1–18.
Published: 01 May 2014
..., spear-nosed bats flew through the tree crowns in search of fruit, palm vipers coiled in ambush in the roots of orchids, jaguars walked the river's edge; around them eight hundred species of trees stood, more than are native to all of North America; a thousand species of butterflies, 6% of the entire...