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Published: 01 May 2013
Figure 1 An adult male Superb Lyrebird with its tail folded over its body at a cleared mound where he conducts courtship displays. Photo: Wikimedia Commons, used with permission from user “Fir0002/Flagstaffotos.” Figure 1. An adult male Superb Lyrebird with its tail folded over its body at More
Image
Published: 01 May 2014
Figure 7 She's soul has left her body, represented by Johnson's hand, and floats above Joe Blow, about to steal his guitar. Figure 7 . She's soul has left her body, represented by Johnson's hand, and floats above Joe Blow, about to steal his guitar. More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 216–238.
Published: 01 May 2019
... these works, Straube explores the meaning of this correlation between ticks and transing bodies for environmental ethics as well as for the forging of livable lives for trans people. Toxicity surfaces as a link in these works. The notion of feminist figuration, developed by philosopher Rosi Braidotti...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 108–136.
Published: 01 May 2019
... Haraway’s proposal to complement the Anthropocene concept with the figuration of Chthulucene, calling for a shift of ethical stance and position of enunciation from the sovereign (white, Western) “I,” waging “war” on cancer to a “we,” based on a planetwide kinship of vulnerable bodies. Underlining that this...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 152–173.
Published: 01 May 2019
...Sasha Litvintseva Abstract Asbestos is a fibrous mineral. Airborne asbestos—similar to nuclear radiation and chemical atmospheric pollutants—is invisible to the naked eye, and living and breathing alongside it has deferred toxic effects on human bodies. The toxicity of asbestos operates by...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 1–18.
Published: 01 May 2014
... by our actions in the present. This article explores a poetics of haunted time via readings of the work of artist/sculptor Ilana Halperin and poet Alice Oswald. Halperin's recent work with the “slow and fast time” of geological processes (calcification and lava flows), and also with the body's own...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 84–107.
Published: 01 May 2017
... interspecies communication through which human caretakers interpret and respond to the psychic lives of these parrots—psychic lives that are marked by troubles ranging from social withdrawal to self-destructive behavior. These interspecies communications include body language, gesture, nonverbal vocalizations...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 447–472.
Published: 01 November 2018
... not to some immaterial quality of mind or soul, but rather to the distinctiveness of human anatomy. It was, we will argue, the body—and, above all, the head—which provided the basis of a modern attempt to establish that humans were creatures of a categorically different order from all other animals...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 230–254.
Published: 01 November 2017
... weighed and handled by breast cancer researchers, and the materials of laboratory and medical work: test tubes, petri dishes, scalpels. Together across three shared video channels, bald pink mice have materially moved into da Costa’s frail body through a deft game of pharmacological cat’s cradle. This...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 149–170.
Published: 01 May 2014
... relations; the second axis emphasizes how beekeepers make their bodies and their selves vulnerable to bees. We show how these beekeepers want us to do more than reshape bees' vulnerability to colony collapse disorder; they want to recognize, and reconstitute, their own vulnerability to the bee. The lessons...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 171–194.
Published: 01 May 2014
... of killing from botrytis' body to metabolic life processes which embrace extracellular enzymes diffused throughout the wine. I suggest that pasteurisation thus displaces killing into spaces, such as wine-in-the-making, within which many metabolic lives coexist and interpenetrate. Pasteurisation...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 149–171.
Published: 01 November 2016
... claim that in the Anthropocene, humans have become a geologic force. At the same time, it opens up a down-to-earth form of geopolitics that exceeds classic notions of the term, attending to different geologic scales; to living bodies, human and nonhuman; to solid rock; and to the planet. We develop our...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 129–148.
Published: 01 May 2017
... inescapably androgenic terms. An ecologically directed evaluation of biopoetry ultimately affirms the indebtedness of all literary production, including biopoetry, to other-than-human lives and bodies. Aspects of technological intervention, nature as “writerly,” and microorganisms as potential data...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 May 2018
... particular lives and wider ecologies. It works on ecologies and bodies alike as a kind of wounding, one not simply or solely to the everyday stuff of biological life but to the very constitution of experience and expression. Critiquing and extending writing on climate, trauma, and aesthetic experience by E...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 129–149.
Published: 01 May 2018
... public dimensions of our being and may thereby work against the tendency to understand and experience ourselves as self-contained and closed off from one another and the world we share in common. This may in turn enhance our sense of entanglement with the events, bodies, and forces on the “outside” of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 359–377.
Published: 01 November 2017
... human in outer space is always already a problem of safely delivering a threatened body through an altogether inimical environment and back again. The maintenance practices of spacecraft life-support systems, real or imagined, thus afford occasion to recover a new layer of historical relations that, in...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 378–397.
Published: 01 November 2017
... ethnographically, by using the angle of ultraviolet. Specifically, I focus on the ultraviolet spectrum to examine how astrobiologists look at celestial bodies, planetary atmospheres, the skin, and the eye. More generally, this article is a reflection on how outer space can be apprehended from a humanities...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 174–179.
Published: 01 May 2019
... endocrine disrupting chemicals. By focusing on the “outside” that is “inside,” the poems draw attention to the coextensive and intra-active nature of the body with its environment and the consequent implications for linking the human to the nonhuman and the personal to the global in environmental ethics...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 194–215.
Published: 01 May 2019
... reclaimed by activists engaged in a project of governance from below. This essay begins by exploring how the entwinement of fascist biopolitics and the chemical industry that occurred at the Ex-SNIA from the 1920s to the 1950s affected human and nonhuman bodies. Building on insights from feminist science...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 242–246.
Published: 01 May 2019
... Berry’s Creek. 1 As we pass Newark I think of the rest of Hull’s poem, “Hospice,” which recounts the life and illness of the speaker’s sister in their home state, New Jersey: “the body, twisting / in a tissue of smoke and dust over Jersey’s / infernal glory of cocktail lounges and chemical plants...