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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2014) 5 (1): 277–281.
Published: 01 May 2014
... transformed. Figure 1 Sean and Michael McQuilken becoming-lightning at Moro Rock, California (1975). Photograph © Michael McQuilken Figure 1. Sean and Michael McQuilken becoming-lightning at Moro Rock, California (1975). Photograph © Michael McQuilken This photograph of two brothers was...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2018) 10 (1): 273–294.
Published: 01 May 2018
... becoming that are inherent to temporization—also involve a kind of violation: a rupture with preexisting states of affairs, pathways whose opening precludes other trajectories. References Andreini Claudia , Bertini Ivano , Cavallaro Gabriele , Holliday Gemma , and Thornton...
Image
Published: 01 May 2014
Figure 1 Sean and Michael McQuilken becoming-lightning at Moro Rock, California (1975). Photograph © Michael McQuilken Figure 1. Sean and Michael McQuilken becoming-lightning at Moro Rock, California (1975). Photograph © Michael McQuilken More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2018) 10 (1): 187–212.
Published: 01 May 2018
... becoming as response-ability. 6. J. Cohen, Stone ; Wills, Inanimation ; Woodard, On an Ungrounded Earth . 7. De Landa, Thousand Years . 8. Stengers, “Cosmopolitical Proposal.” 9. Braun et al., Grounding the Anthropocene , n.p. 10. E.g. T. Cohen et al., Twilight of the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2018) 10 (1): 129–149.
Published: 01 May 2018
... condition of creativity, open up new modes of receptivity and responsiveness to species extinctions? This essay turns to philosophies of becoming and to recent research in the biological sciences to explore this possibility. I suggest that attending to the heterogeneity of experience alerts us to more...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2014) 4 (1): 125–148.
Published: 01 May 2014
... pleasant and ‘nice’ version of coexistence. But, dealing with composting, it becomes clear that relations with the environment are never so neat and clean. What are, then, the modes of being together with the ‘dirty’ side of the ‘green’? What practices emerge at the mundane interstices of the ‘big picture...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2014) 4 (1): 149–170.
Published: 01 May 2014
... to be drawn are less about solving bee decline and more about how becoming less uncomfortable with vulnerability and seeking to put ourselves at risk to others becomes an ethical practice. The example of these alternative beekeepers suggests that we might learn to accept more generously the risks of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2014) 4 (1): 171–194.
Published: 01 May 2014
... therefore both protects and spoils wine, reconfiguring multiple human-nonhuman relationships in conflicting and sometimes economically costly ways. In so doing, it illustrates that in a more-than-human world killing becomes difficult to confine to a single unwanted organism or species. Killing instead...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2017) 9 (2): 181–203.
Published: 01 November 2017
...Alessandro Antonello; Mark Carey Abstract Ice cores from Antarctica, Greenland, and the high-mountain cryosphere have become essential sources of evidence on the climate dating back nearly 800,000 years. Earth scientists use ice cores to understand the chemical composition of the atmosphere, which...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2017) 9 (2): 398–417.
Published: 01 November 2017
...Juan Francisco Salazar Abstract This article explores world-making processes through which extreme frontiers of life are made habitable. Examining how notions of life are enlarged, incorporated, and appropriated in complex geopolitical contexts, the article argues that microbial worlds are becoming...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2012) 1 (1): 69–84.
Published: 01 May 2012
...Libby Robin Abstract Land management has become a multi-faceted enterprise, with professionals, locals and others contributing variously to the outcomes, increasingly working in partnership arrangements all over the world. However, each local place has a different suite of ‘experts’ speaking for...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2012) 1 (1): 7–21.
Published: 01 May 2012
...Timothy Morton Abstract The Anthropocene is the radical intersection of human history and geological time. Humans have belatedly realised that they have become a geophysical force on a planetary scale. This creeping realisation has an Oedipal logic, that is to say, it is a strange loop in which one...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2015) 6 (1): 103–130.
Published: 01 May 2015
... modern infrastructure. By creating and maintaining divisions, they make it possible for new kinds of agency to emerge. Infrastructures become animate: responsive to their environments in ways that allow them to persist in the face of continual change. 45 Ecologists often interpret such...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2016) 8 (2): 149–171.
Published: 01 November 2016
... claim that in the Anthropocene, humans have become a geologic force. At the same time, it opens up a down-to-earth form of geopolitics that exceeds classic notions of the term, attending to different geologic scales; to living bodies, human and nonhuman; to solid rock; and to the planet. We develop our...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2015) 6 (1): 1–27.
Published: 01 May 2015
... which memory, movement and materiality play full parts. I consider absence, loss and displacement and how they operate within self-landscape practice, and how particular forms of materiality (in this case, large bridges) become charged with all sorts of emotions relating to personal history (how bridges...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2014) 5 (1): 155–170.
Published: 01 May 2014
... from their iconographic and indexical qualities—in other words, their seeming ability to ground symbolic discourse in something that is undeniably and materially real. In the Anthropocene, however, physical nature itself has become a medium for the inscription of human messages, and effective planetary...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2016) 8 (2): 215–234.
Published: 01 November 2016
... the implications of ME for the environmental humanities in general and for Anthropocene narratives in particular. ME relies on non-Darwinian evolutionary principles. In common with other branches of Earth system science, it also destabilizes prevailing ontological categories. Life becomes more...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2014) 5 (1): 1–11.
Published: 01 May 2014
... argue present a unique example of what Guy Debord calls the “tautological” nature of spectacle, its capacity to serve as its own evidence at the same time as it becomes a mode of relation among people. My questions concern the political potential of the EIS. As the effect of the real created by time...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2014) 5 (1): 203–216.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Alexa Weik von Mossner Abstract Covering the time span from 2021 to 16000 N.C., Dale Pendell's speculative novel The Great Bay chronicles the profound climatic, geological and ecological transformations that California undergoes during these fourteen millennia. Human life becomes unimaginably small...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (2014) 5 (1): 217–232.
Published: 01 May 2014
... connections. Exploring a multiplicity of cultural techniques and actors, human as well as non-human, involved in the production of the image of the globe, this atlas becomes a medium of “being in the world” rather than one of “looking at” it. Being in the world is also the attempt of another photographic...