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Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 2. LuYang, Cancer Baby (2014–15), video still. Used by permission of the artist. Figure 2. LuYang, Cancer Baby (2014–15), video still. Used by permission of the artist.
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 255–279.
Published: 01 November 2017
.... By interspersing a story of humans and machines with insect life, Butler pointed to a broad imaginative web of interspecies and machinic relationships. Contemporary artists Pierre Huyghe, Ann Lislegaard, and Hayden Fowler use video and installation art to explore interspecies relationships in time...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 241–256.
Published: 01 May 2018
... enchantment and the role of art in exploring this relationship. Concepts that enfold deep time and ecology like the Anthropocene and Timothy Morton’s “mesh” have the power to enchant because, in Mark A. Schneider’s terms, they expose us to “something both real and at the same time uncanny, weird, mysterious...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 1–23.
Published: 01 May 2016
... immersion? What does it mean to live with others in entangled worlds of contingency and uncertainty? More fundamentally, how can we do the work of inhabiting and coconstituting worlds well? In taking up these questions, this article explores the cultivation of “arts of attentiveness”: modes of both paying...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 24–36.
Published: 01 May 2016
... enlarged world. These practices cannot be reduced to a livestock economy: shepherds consider herding a work of transformation and ecological recuperation—of the land, of the sheep, of ways of being together. Learning the “arts of living on a damaged planet,” as Anna Tsing has termed it, humans and animals...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 149–155.
Published: 01 May 2013
... social and moral concerns, is not the best way to conceive of the project of the Presocratics. Nor does this narrative offer us the best way to conceive of the distinctive tasks of the environmental arts (a term which I argue is to be preferred to the environmental humanities) and their relation to the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 60–83.
Published: 01 May 2017
... and human experience at their center, inviting the spectator to experience atmospheres and environments anew. Relying on the disorienting and defamiliarizing effects of enlarged scale and colored fog, Eliasson tools his art to increase the spectators’ awareness both of their environment and of their...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 69–93.
Published: 01 May 2014
... win their trust, Wiseman is able to shock his spectators. With interviews and consideration of the semiotic content of Uranium, I explore possibilities for activation of ecological consciousness through performing arts. Building on the shared ideas of Heinrich von Kleist, Gregory Bateson, and Thomas...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 191–202.
Published: 01 May 2016
..., and What Alice Found There (1871). In some ways this essay is like a work of applied theory whereby philosophical concepts are used to advance interpretations of works of art and literature. But, at the same time and in contrast, the works of art and literature brought into dialogue with Marder help...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 230–254.
Published: 01 November 2017
... distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). art cancer food multispecies Beatriz da Costa died on December 27, 2012. 1 She was thirty-eight years old. She had been negotiating with cancer for many years. These negotiations were not addressed by her art practice until...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 309–324.
Published: 01 November 2017
... research is always characterized by a specific aesthetic style and by a particular “cosmic imagination,” as some have called it. Scientific knowledge of the universe is based on skilled judgments rather than on direct, unmediated perception. It is science, but it is also an art. This special section...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 398–417.
Published: 01 November 2017
... “into the evolutionary processes governing life on Earth and other planets, but can also help humans live outside their own ‘extreme envelope.’” 69 At stake, is also how slowly but relentlessly, Antarctica is being “de-extremized” through worlding processes that are making Antarctica familiar. Art...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 343–347.
Published: 01 May 2018
... ground mammal was effortlessly re-sung back into a fleeting time-space of animated presence. In the thick time of the present day, my revisit to this powerful meeting took impetus within the environmental humanities and contemporary arts—in an intersectional research space of extinction and loss, affect...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 May 2018
... might cinema, art, literature, and other cultural texts make climate trauma manifest not simply as theme, setting, or symbol but within and through particular affective forms? How might future catastrophe emerge in aesthetic expression? This last question is the focus of E. Ann Kaplan’s 2016 book...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 213–225.
Published: 01 May 2018
... Fragments: Placing the Anthroposcene.” MICHELLE BASTIAN is a chancellor’s fellow at the Edinburgh College of Art, where her research focuses on critical time studies and environmental humanities, with an emphasis on the relationship between time and belonging. She is the editor of three collections...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 20–39.
Published: 01 May 2018
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 41–67.
Published: 01 May 2014
... “the psychic and social structures in which we live” have become “profoundly antiecological, unhealthy and destructive.” 7 Ingram thus promoted a notion of the “ecological self” that privileges music as a vital art form for exploring human relationships with natural and built environments. 8 As...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 273–294.
Published: 01 May 2018
... destructive of time itself. We approach volcanism through the construct of a “speculative geology” that draws on a recent return to metaphysical themes in philosophy as well as a growing interest in geologic processes in the arts, humanities, and popular culture. In this way, alongside cause-effect relations...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 129–148.
Published: 01 May 2017
...John Charles Ryan AbstractThis article examines the DNA-based biopoetry of Christian Bök in relation to its antecedents in the art-science experiments of Joe Davis, Pak Chung Wong, and Eduardo Kac. In particular, I develop an ecocritical analysis of the process of encipherment at the center of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 37–56.
Published: 01 May 2016
... choreograph an ontological state. Conducting an outmoded pregnancy test with live Xenopus frogs, we probed the contours of this gap. As we took an antiquated bioassay out of medical archives, we conducted a performative experiment—an intervention that blurred the boundaries between performance art, science...