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algae

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 359–377.
Published: 01 November 2017
... sources, I detail the history of the bioregenerative life-support system, a system in which simple organisms—most commonly algae—would inhabit the spacecraft and, through a series of interspecies symbioses, maintain cabin conditions and sustain astronaut life. By homing in on the maintenance practices of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 174–179.
Published: 01 May 2019
.... Coffees defend themselves with contraceptives. In the beans, in the Mesozoic algae in the disposable cup. A stone rolled in front of a cave makes a mediocre lock. A crocodile in a moat is more difficult to pick. Locksmiths don’t call these locks any more than they would a chair wedged against a...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 149–153.
Published: 01 May 2014
... twenty-four-hour stay in 1961 (or perhaps 1960) inside the world's first artificial ecosystem, breathing oxygen reconstituted by algae from his own exhalations. He traces a shift from the totalizing, static “Whole Earth” images of the late twentieth century to the visibly composite acts of cognition that...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 29–52.
Published: 01 May 2015
... 13 April, 2013, lists 130 species in all—thirty species of seaweeds; ten species of protists; one species of blue green algae; and 89 species of animals, all invertebrates. Of the 130 total species, 119 have been classified as native to Japan; four have been classified as open-ocean, pelagic species...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 129–149.
Published: 01 May 2018
... term, refers to the appearance in . . . symbiotic partners of new behaviors, new metabolism, new tissues, new organs or organelles, and new gene products, etc. . . . The classical example of symbiosis is between fungi and algae or, alternatively, fungi and cyanobacteria. The rock-clinging...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 300–308.
Published: 01 November 2017
... here folding the fabric of the uninhabited and habitable cosmos into the shape of human nightmares and dreams. Or get ready to learn about the wrinkles binding microbial and multispecies life to astronaut well-being, as bioregenerative spaceship life-support systems employ algae to transmute urine and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 155–170.
Published: 01 May 2014
... collective existence as a species. One of these pioneers was the cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, the first person to ascend into space. The other was the biologist Evgeni Shepelev, who spent twenty-four hours in the world's first artificial ecosystem, a claustrophobic tank in which 12 gallons of green algae recycled...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 107–128.
Published: 01 May 2018
... oysters are highly effective at removing nutrients and sediment from water. 35 Combined, these various rifts resulted in the eutrophication of the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. Eutrophication literally means “well nourished.” However, nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous feed algae, which grow...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 40–62.
Published: 01 May 2018
... yeast terroir fermentation studies multispecies studies Tiny microorganisms are huge figures in future foodscapes. In Isaac Asimov’s classic Foundation and Empire series, the central planet Trantor was sustained on giant underground vats of yeast and algae tended by robot labor...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 141–154.
Published: 01 May 2012
... interspecies living—was invented for the lichen, an association of a fungus and an alga or cyanobacteria. The non-fungal partner fuels lichen metabolism through photosynthesis; the fungus makes it possible for the lichen to live in extreme conditions. Repeated cycles of wetting and drying do not faze the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 149–171.
Published: 01 November 2016
... different phyla had evolved the ability to form multiple mineral forms. Today, biominerals take forms ranging from the silica cellular coatings of some algae 53 and the shells of mollusks to the iron oxide crystals that allow migratory birds to orient and the bones of vertebrates. These are at once...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 37–56.
Published: 01 May 2016
...: “There’s a little algae in there though, not sure. I’m so glad you two decided, after all, to take the traditional route to having a baby. :-)” After waiting overnight, the couple consulted with a medical doctor who advised that they take a home pregnancy test. “Once we knew we’d have to do it, we ran over...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 77–94.
Published: 01 May 2016
... and texture and with enough moisture and sunlight that it germinates and, if it is lucky enough to find its symbiotic partner, grows.” 21 This symbiotic partner is an alga or cyanobacterium that provides photosynthetic capabilities to a fungus. All lichen are cross-kingdom collaborations of this...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 309–324.
Published: 01 November 2017
... invisible practices of care. More specifically, she documents the history of the “bioregenerative life-support system,” a system in which simple organisms like algae would populate the space cabin and, through a series of interspecies symbioses, maintain cabin conditions and sustain astronaut life. By...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 378–397.
Published: 01 November 2017
.... Moreover, a wide range of macroscopic organisms—including fungi, algae, land plants, and animals—have turned out to be relatively tolerant to the harsh conditions of outer space as well. Leopoldo Sancho, Rosa de la Torre, and Ana Pintado have exposed different lichens to space in ESA’s BIOPAN facilities...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 23–55.
Published: 01 May 2012