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Chthulucene figuration

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 108–136.
Published: 01 May 2019
... Haraway’s proposal to complement the Anthropocene concept with the figuration of Chthulucene, calling for a shift of ethical stance and position of enunciation from the sovereign (white, Western) “I,” waging “war” on cancer to a “we,” based on a planetwide kinship of vulnerable bodies. Underlining that this...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 159–165.
Published: 01 May 2015
... other terrans, flourishing for rich multispecies assemblages that include people will be possible. I am calling all this the Chthulucene—past, present, and to come. 7 These real and possible timespaces are not named after SF writer H.P. Lovecraft's misogynist racial-nightmare monster Cthulhu (note...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 133–150.
Published: 01 May 2016
...Lesley Instone; Affrica Taylor Abstract Modes of thinking matter. In this article we engage with the figure of the Anthropocene as the impetus for rethinking the messy environmental legacies of Australian settler colonialism that we have inherited. We do this rethinking in a small rural valley...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 216–238.
Published: 01 May 2019
... these works, Straube explores the meaning of this correlation between ticks and transing bodies for environmental ethics as well as for the forging of livable lives for trans people. Toxicity surfaces as a link in these works. The notion of feminist figuration, developed by philosopher Rosi Braidotti...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 129–149.
Published: 01 May 2018
... know what it is like to be one. In Nagel’s account, heterogeneity is figured negatively—as a failure or lack of resemblance—and functions to constrain his knowledge of bats. Today, as white-nose syndrome threatens bat populations across North America, might figuring heterogeneity positively, as a...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 418–432.
Published: 01 November 2017
... embodiment as well as literal and figurative orientations to potential hazards. © 2017 Jessica O’Reilly 2017 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). extreme nature bureaucracy disaster Antarctic climate Antarctica is...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 129–132.
Published: 01 May 2016
... and technology studies, Indigenous humanities and the sociology of waste. This spread testifies to the broad reach and relevance of issues of inheritance in settler colonial contexts and in ecologically challenging times. In “Thinking about Inheritance Through the Figure of the Anthropocene, from...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 101–107.
Published: 01 May 2019
... , 2017 . Haraway Donna J. “ Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Plantationocene, Chthulucene: Making Kin .” Environmental Humanities 6 ( 2015 ): 159 – 65 . Haraway Donna J. “ Introduction: A Kinship of Feminist Figurations .” In The Haraway Reader , edited by Haraway Donna , 1...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 235–239.
Published: 01 November 2016
... choice logs. Figure 1. Stag beetle ( Lucanus cervus ). Image courtesy of Maria Fremlin Figure 1. Stag beetle (Lucanus cervus). Image courtesy of Maria Fremlin Eating apples in the graveyard in the company of a wizened botanist, I was also given a more profound lesson in finitude. Waving...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 460–463.
Published: 01 November 2017
... together” on a damaged Earth. 8 It is a fervent invitation “to make kin” across disparate parts of the ecological web, reimagining and reinventing these interrelations, for we must “become-with each other or not at all.” 9 Figure 1. A tapestry of bubbling, fermenting sourdough. Credit: Alex...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 203–217.
Published: 01 May 2016
... and consumption. Some scholars have asked whether the Anthropocene might better be known as the Capitalocene. 5 My examination of recent avatars of the Hokusai figure builds on art historian Christine Guth's Hokusai's Great Wave: Biography of a Global Icon, the essential account of the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 213–225.
Published: 01 May 2018
... creatures past, present, and future. Alienation is perhaps the most logical reaction to sublime, inhuman timescales. Confronted by stretched-out temporal horizons, the human figure is marginalized, decentered as measure of all things. In this moment of temporal dislocation the environmental humanities...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 118–142.
Published: 01 May 2016
... human poisoning, the doctor and his team burn it in the forest. If the carcass is noninfectious, they leave it in the forest to decay so that other species can feed on it ( fig. 1 ). Figure 1. Elephant carcass at the wildlife sanctuary. Courtesy of Arun Zachariah Figure 1. Elephant carcass at...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 1–23.
Published: 01 May 2016
... mutually reinforcing processes of biosocial destruction—from mass extinction to climate change, from globalization to terrorism. There are many names for our current condition—Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Plantationocene, Chthulucene, White-supremacy-cene, and the list goes on 9 —but whatever it is called...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 151–168.
Published: 01 May 2016
.... Figure 1. Children watch the raccoons through the window. Author's photograph. Figure 1. Children watch the raccoons through the window. Author's photograph. The children's and educators' curiosity about the raccoons is tinged with disconcertment. Humans in the childcare centres are taken...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 72–100.
Published: 01 May 2019
... multiple historical processes that created ecological crises (e.g., Capitalocene) and the many relationships across humans and other species affected by these exploits (e.g., Chthulucene). 8 Overall, scholars invest considerable effort in creating and manipulating a concept that helps us think about our...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 3–26.
Published: 01 May 2019
... living (well) on a damaged planet. Promising, yet precarious, these emergent forms of life offer hope in a blasted landscape (Kirksey et al. 2014). Figure 1. A landscape of multispecies mutualism. Photo by author. Figure 1. A landscape of multispecies mutualism. Photo by author. Figure 2...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 501–527.
Published: 01 November 2018
... physics and chemistry to transform themselves into plant food in the generic backyard compost pile. While shit happens even without the interventions of human household composters, our attention to the turning and distribution of these matters figures us as facilitators in these tender alchemies. In...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 63–85.
Published: 01 May 2018
..., scientific and political concerns over invasive species, particularly beavers, dominate the ways the landscape’s wilderness identity and related practices of care are produced and contested. Figure 1. Silvery timber litters the landscape after a beaver dam has flooded the forest in Karukinka Nature...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 171–186.
Published: 01 May 2018
... wildlife conservation data into an affective mode of communication and address from the individual animal that gestures beyond the biopolitical tendancy of species conservation. Figure 1. Bear 71 peers out of a cage before being released into Banff National Park with her new radio collar. Bear 71...