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Journal Article
English Language Notes (2006) 44 (1): 57–66.
Published: 01 March 2006
... model of lit­ erary criticism. In Stanley Fish's influential account of M ilton's narrator, readers o f the epic are "accused, taunted by an im perious voice" that hum iliates and shames them into a gradual acceptance of their own fallenness. Instead of merely attributing the poet's motives to a stock...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2000) 38 (2): 75–92.
Published: 01 December 2000
...Donna Schlosser Copyright © 2000 Regents of the University of Colorado 2000 Decem ber 2000 75 AUTOBIOGRAPHY, IDENTITY, AND SELF-AGENCY: NARRATIVE VOICE IN BHARARTI MUKHERJEE SJasmine In the fictional autobiography Jasmine, by Bharati Mukherjee, an illegal H indu im m igrant in the U nited...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2012) 50 (1): 55–66.
Published: 01 March 2012
... relationship to its repudiation of authorial voice given that, as an African American woman, she had historically been denied agency or a voice from which to speak. Copyright © 2012 Regents of the University of Colorado 2012 R e s p o n s e s to E r in a D u g a n n e , Fa m il y Fo l k t a l e s : C a r...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2012) 50 (1): 67–75.
Published: 01 March 2012
... relationship to its repudiation of authorial voice given that, as an African American woman, she had historically been denied agency or a voice from which to speak. Copyright © 2012 Regents of the University of Colorado 2012 C hristina B attle 67 Everything you Read and See Just M ight be a Lie AKA Don't...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2008) 46 (1): 105–111.
Published: 01 March 2008
... in the helix o f the ear."1"Even so," he continues, "I cannot w ith my voice make the phys­ ical sound that w ould be the equivalent o f w hat I hear on m y inner ear." Heaney calls attention to the ghost o f sound we hear when reading silently, which is a difficult phenom ­ enon to describe, and a different...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2006) 44 (1): 207.
Published: 01 March 2006
...Elizabeth Robinson Copyright © 2006 Regents of the University of Colorado 2006 Speak E l iz a b e t h R o b in s o n Address is its own metaphysics. See: the hereafter In which I speak, now, solely in your voice. Certain tunes tune themselves this way. United, but how shall I ever know...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2005) 43 (2): 166–169.
Published: 01 December 2005
... is provided by something critics have overlooked: the etymolo­ gy of the word anthem. The word anthem is a cognate of antiphon and antipho­ ny : from anti = in return + phone = voice. An antiphon is a musi­ cal composition that is sung responsively. According to the OED, Antiphon is . . . a re...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2013) 51 (2): 95–106.
Published: 01 September 2013
... her leaning, her inclinations as a part o f w hat it means to read. The hologram reflects a wholeness beyond the whole. It reflects the reader, the critic back, not as a reader o r critic, but as a part of w hat the text is doing-as an echo among the perpetual echoes of voices always come to life.The...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2003) 41 (1): 44–53.
Published: 01 September 2003
... to doubt, when I consider all thy past tender vows, when I reflect how thou hast lov d and sworn. Methinks I hear the Musick of thy voice still whispering in my bosom; methinks the Charming softness of thy words remain like lessening Eccho s on my Soul, whose distant Voyces by degrees decay, till...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2012) 50 (1): 231–236.
Published: 01 March 2012
... 'e m p lo i" o f th is schizoid legion o f voices, an epistolary engagem ent w ith "W ho am This Tim e?" These voices are channelled live from the airwaves, coast to coast, from the United States of Am erika. M edia theory m ust return to Blatty's text as a style m anual fo r som e em erging trends...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2002) 39 (3): 70–78.
Published: 01 March 2002
... h id d e n for too long, an d by so doing, m ake clean th e nak ed exposure.1 A striking contrast in Dylan T hom as s career, one which his critics are apt to treat severely, arises from the drunken, roaring boy image he presented in the pubs and the meditative, at times liturgical voice in his...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2004) 41 (4): 50–63.
Published: 01 June 2004
... by the editors are straightforward translations.4 Foreign words tend to be most visible in The Burial of the D ead and W hat the T h u n d er Said ; while the m iddle o f the poem carries a num ber of different English-language voices (the aris­ tocratic woman in the burnished parlor, the pub patron...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2011) 49 (2): 73–82.
Published: 01 September 2011
... to authorial 'vo ice 5These term s seem used w ithin a rhetoric of dis­ missal here, and the lineage of this dismissal is easy to trace: "confessionalist," "essentialist" and even "voice" (as w ell as commiseration/care/tending) are all term s often associated with femininity, women's work, with the m inor...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2007) 45 (1): 45–56.
Published: 01 March 2007
... the undifferentiated unawareness o f the archive he dis­ covers not so much into books, but into individual, identifiable authors. W hat Poggio wants is not inform ation, not even, really, the books he wants a voice that the books can provide. The figure of the author is the Renaissance hum anists' positive...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2023) 61 (2): 23–38.
Published: 01 October 2023
... future as a space where voices, bodies, objects, and desires congregate. Particular conditions in which futures are imagined come to bear on the futures that are imaginable and the range of conceptual resources that can be marshaled to imagine such futures. Conditions of occupation disturb, interrupt...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2004) 42 (1): 48–55.
Published: 01 September 2004
..., but finally rejects, the dream of a maternal, feminine, poetic discourse that is n o t already inscribed within hegemonic language. 12 According to Cutter, Edna learns that there is no feminine voice out there that can be used to disrupt the voice of patriarchy. 13 Cutter does note, however, the possibil­...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2000) 38 (2): 96–107.
Published: 01 December 2000
... f the absent Father (whose void is filled by the Law, prohibition) and the im poverishm ent o f desire. The final chapter, D epression and Vocation in the 1805 Prelude. The Homeless Voice o f W aters, revives the poetic cor­ pus of W ordsworth. Contrary to those critics who find in W ordsworth s...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2020) 58 (2): 121–135.
Published: 01 October 2020
.... The text seeks to put a name on the unnameable, to express in language a merging that can be understood only through bodily experience. In this way the voice of The Book of Margery Kempe can be both Kempe and the scribe at once, at all times. It can be the female voice that we desperately seek within...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2005) 42 (4): 19–23.
Published: 01 June 2005
... by telling him that he is a man, and m en know that the Moving of the earth brings harms and fears, though less harmful than her separation from him: Men reckon what it did and meant. Thus again the female voice, while rem inding her addressee of his masculinity and the trappings that issue out...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2003) 41 (1): 86–89.
Published: 01 September 2003
... Restoration with its rebuilding of monarchial authority. While radical prophets (including Milton) continued to predict the fall of England, new voices arose to represent the Cavaliers as a lower culture of lamenting prophets, weeping for the destruction of their briefly held Jerusalem and search­ ing...