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Journal Article
English Language Notes (2019) 57 (2): 127–132.
Published: 01 October 2019
...Andrea Haslanger Abstract This short piece reads two of Phillis Wheatley’s elegies to children to reflect on how they represent the dead as speaking rather than silent. It considers how the deceased’s speech invokes different categories of the child, overlaying political and theological ideas about...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2010) 48 (2): 27–35.
Published: 01 September 2010
... governance and public speech in Britain.The British governm ent was under pres­ sure internally on issues ranging from im pressm ent to abolition and parliamen­ tary reform , and externally from the consequences of the American and French Revolutions and slave rebellions in the West Indies...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2008) 46 (1): 75–87.
Published: 01 March 2008
.... It is, however, to suggest that a desire to make his­ to ry can motivate a resistance to event. Chartist speech practices can illum inate the art of failure, as we m ight call it the strategic value o f speech that seeks but fails to have realw orld impact, instead occupying and even staging the present m om...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2013) 51 (1): 185–189.
Published: 01 March 2013
... Ogúddè, ìwo l pa á dé Baba tí nlári ni n la'rí lágbájá Head Cleaver Pure speech Pure speech Pure speech As the Splitter breaks the head Pure speech closes it up Headsplitter is now breaking [the client's] head Ògúdctèwá pa á dé Rééréé ni kí o ré e kúró Pure speech come hither to close it back Topple...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2001) 39 (1): 12–23.
Published: 01 September 2001
... lishes an intimacy between Caesar and Brutus that acts to hu­ manize the characters, and that the question s brevity assists in such a purpose when considered against the predominantly speech-driven style of the play.2 Et tu, Brutèf resonates within the play for two m ajor rea­ sons, one being its...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2006) 44 (1): 103–107.
Published: 01 March 2006
... vation in passus XI [107-39], which form the context forTrajan's eruption into the poem; and a passage from Christ's speech at the harrowing of hell in passus XVIII [366-400], a speech that validates and extends W ill's radical opinions" (154).4 Acknowledging th a t 11.107-39 "has been read in many w...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2008) 46 (1): 105–111.
Published: 01 March 2008
... experience from that o f hearing speech or music. I am sure many readers have felt, w ith Heaney, that the "so u n d " they experience in "the mind's ear" is the m ost beautiful rendition of a poem that they are capable of producing, and the one that gives them the truest experience of the poem...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2012) 50 (1): 19–27.
Published: 01 March 2012
... speech e m e rg e s fro m silence and lapses back into silence. Flow gives a shape to both speech and silence, d is tin ­ g u is h in g w h a t is in th e rap fro m w h a t is n 't in it. Eileen M yles has a sim ila r idea in the last lines o f her novel inferno. She calls it "g ra ce ": W hen I w alk...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2010) 48 (2): 9–14.
Published: 01 September 2010
...Marianne Constable Copyright © 2010 Regents of the University of Colorado 2010 S peaking the La n g u a g e of La w : A J u r i s -d ic t io n a l P r im e r MARIANNE CONSTABLE U I uris-diction" concerns the speaking of la w by law and about law in a place 11 where legal speech is warranted...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2006) 44 (1): 203–206.
Published: 01 March 2006
... laughed. "W hy did you laugh?" I asked. "Because the story is funny," she responded.This made no sense, as I explained to her: she had­ n't spoken any words aloud, so she hadn't been reading. I was assured that she had derived nothing through her reading eyes, because the eyes had not translated to speech...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2003) 41 (1): 80–82.
Published: 01 September 2003
..., Capt. Willy, smiled approvingly. He was not going to have his family dropping their aitches ah over the place. In writing about the South, regional authors often use the aspirated form of the pronoun it, written hit, as an example of Southern speech, especially that of the lower classes, be they white...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2003) 41 (2): 1–18.
Published: 01 December 2003
... One of the sim­ plest gnomes in the poem is spoken by a character who has not attracted much attention as heroic, and the occasion of her speech may be a fine place to reevaluate her heroism. During the joyous feast that follows Beowulf s triumph over Grendel, amidst the tumult of hall-joy...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2011) 49 (2): 111–117.
Published: 01 September 2011
... or, first person plural, I&l.This I is in fi­ nite, or in Rasta speech, l-finite; it reverberates like the echo in reggae dub and proliferates outward, the speaker at once sistren, cotton tree, and holy Mt. Zion. Adrian McFarlane calls this "a synthesis of the empirical and the metaphysical," and in the w...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2002) 39 (4): 96–98.
Published: 01 June 2002
..., Talk­ ing Back, Acting Up, Bowing Out) is the great psychological im­ portance he attributes to Byron s three recitations on Speech Days. H e sees them as auditions o r trials of perform ative and autotherapeutic strategies ; His selection of texts . . . partici­ pates in a larger pattern of self...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2009) 47 (2): 35–47.
Published: 01 September 2009
...Bella Mirabella Copyright © 2009 Regents of the University of Colorado 2009 Stea lin g C enter Stag e: Female Mo untebanks, Pseud o science, and N o npro fessio n al T heater BELLA MIRABELLA In 1405 Italian humanist Leonardo Bruni had this warning for wom en regarding speech: "For if a wom...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2006) 44 (1): 221–225.
Published: 01 March 2006
.... The poem that speaks of spirit today m ust find a way to w ork inside this catastrophe. It must take up residence in the tension between saying and not-saying, between Eckhart's cataphatlc nom ination of God through the reciprocity o f human speech and Levinas's apophatic interdiction on the word fo r God...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2006) 44 (1): 209–212.
Published: 01 March 2006
... and unprecedented proper­ ties that bring them into poetic relation w ith one another. Here, the unsayable nature of the divine is manifested In the speech-act itself.The mystical union does not silence, but instead unseals the Word. The encounter with the Absolute must also relativize the difference between speech...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2001) 39 (2): 1–10.
Published: 01 December 2001
...Alexis Brooks De Vita Copyright © 2001 Regents of the University of Colorado 2001 English Language Notes Volume XXXIX N um ber 2 D ecem ber 2001 SELFLESS LOVE: READING THE WOMAN IN PLATO S SYMPOSIUM S IDEAL MAN In the final encom ium , o r speech segment, of Plato s Sympo­ sium...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2003) 41 (1): 19–32.
Published: 01 September 2003
... the gift of persuasive speech throughout the play, Tamburlaine attempts to obfuscate the reality that what he is doing is not right. But he needs some help in justifying his violent course of action. The most logical approach to solving this problem of creat­ ing legitimacy is to marry someone...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2010) 48 (2): 153–161.
Published: 01 September 2010
... the quotation, which is from the glossator Azo and implies rather m ore than Coke was w illin g to relate. So pause a m om ent.The definition or maxim deserves unpacking. Return to the etymology. In a straightforward but overlooked syntactic sense, the word is form ed from law and speech. More than that, sim...