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sea

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Journal Article
English Language Notes (1 April 2019) 57 (1): 116–128.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Harris Feinsod Abstract This essay is a narrowly drawn exercise in comparison at a narrow passage of marine transit—the Panama Canal Zone. It argues that the spatial typology of the “zone” might supply one of the figures for a tropological history of comparative modernism at sea. The essay follows...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (1 April 2019) 57 (1): 129–139.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Nicole Rizzuto Abstract Absent from prodigious critical scholarship about the seas is a discussion of modernism between the wars. Yet this period is rife with writing set on the waters. This essay argues that it is in their orchestrations of the waters as dead zones that such works revitalize...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (1 March 2014) 52 (1): 120–122.
Published: 01 March 2014
Journal Article
English Language Notes (1 September 2000) 38 (1): 58–68.
Published: 01 September 2000
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 1. Burial procession in Richard Fleischer, 20,000 Leagues under the Sea , 1954. Figure 1. Burial procession in Richard Fleischer, 20,000 Leagues under the Sea, 1954. More
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 9. Shark carnage in John Sturges, The Old Man and the Sea , 1958. Figure 9. Shark carnage in John Sturges, The Old Man and the Sea, 1958. More
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 11. Spectators in the deep-sea vessel in Wes Andersen, The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou , 2004. Figure 11. Spectators in the deep-sea vessel in Wes Andersen, The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, 2004. More
Journal Article
English Language Notes (1 December 2005) 43 (2): 93–96.
Published: 01 December 2005
Journal Article
English Language Notes (1 April 2019) 57 (1): 140–151.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Maxwell Uphaus Abstract This essay proposes, through an analysis of T. S. Eliot’s “The Dry Salvages,” a model for the study of the sea in modernism based on British modernism’s relationship with the contemporaneous idea that the sea was the essence of British history. “The Dry Salvages” rejects the...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (1 April 2019) 57 (1): 21–36.
Published: 01 April 2019
... of an Anthropocene ocean. In this scholarly turn to the ocean, the concepts of fluidity, flow, routes, and mobility have been emphasized over other, less poetic terms such as blue water navies, mobile offshore bases, high-seas exclusion zones, sea lanes of communication (SLOCs), and maritime “choke...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (1 April 2019) 57 (1): 82–95.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Teresa Shewry Abstract Navigating humor’s potentials for violence and for creative and critical connections with oceanic catastrophes, from extinctions to sea-level rise, this essay argues that humor is a diverse and perhaps important dimension of contemporary cultural production about the changing...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (1 April 2019) 57 (1): 51–71.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Figure 1. Burial procession in Richard Fleischer, 20,000 Leagues under the Sea , 1954. Figure 1. Burial procession in Richard Fleischer, 20,000 Leagues under the Sea, 1954. ...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (1 April 2019) 57 (1): 72–81.
Published: 01 April 2019
... seas”; that understand the cryosphere as a model for new forms of relation and collaboration; that turn to Indigenous knowledge and traditional ecological knowledge for guidance. Copyright © 2019 Regents of the University of Colorado 2019 Arctic Anthropocene polar America climate change...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (1 March 2012) 50 (1): 241–246.
Published: 01 March 2012
...Scott Slovic Abstract What is called subjectivity is really just a small region of a much larger space of interactions between beings: coffee cups, sea foam, flakes of obsidian, and nebulae. To realize this is to enter into a larger world in which humans coexist with a plenitude of uncanny entities...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (1 March 2012) 50 (1): 247–251.
Published: 01 March 2012
...Margaret Ronda Abstract What is called subjectivity is really just a small region of a much larger space of interactions between beings: coffee cups, sea foam, flakes of obsidian, and nebulae. To realize this is to enter into a larger world in which humans coexist with a plenitude of uncanny...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (1 March 2012) 50 (1): 253–258.
Published: 01 March 2012
...Nicola Masciandaro Abstract What is called subjectivity is really just a small region of a much larger space of interactions between beings: coffee cups, sea foam, flakes of obsidian, and nebulae. To realize this is to enter into a larger world in which humans coexist with a plenitude of uncanny...
Image
Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 2. Laying hemp carpets in Mark Young, The Making of “20,000 Leagues under the Sea,” 2003. Figure 2. Laying hemp carpets in Mark Young, The Making of “20,000 Leagues under the Sea,” 2003. More
Journal Article
English Language Notes (1 April 2019) 57 (1): 1–10.
Published: 01 April 2019
..., Africa, and elsewhere, this strand of historical and imaginative thought has, in the past two decades, coalesced into a far more complex formation. 1 One major aspect of work that has been woven into humanist and Indigenous accounts of the oceanic is the scientific exploration of the seas, a process...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (1 April 2018) 56 (1): 209–213.
Published: 01 April 2018
... his servant setting out on a quest for “the place where the two seas meet.” The passage reads as follows: (v. 60) And when Moses said unto his servant, “I shall continue on till I reach the junction of the two seas, even if I journey for a long time. (v. 61) Then when they reached the junction of...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (1 April 2019) 57 (1): 11–20.
Published: 01 April 2019
..., / or being scared of water” and wonders why, every time she sees the sea, she feels as if she is drowning. After this opening, set in the present, the poem swivels to the past, outlining a repressed history of slavery and colonization that returns via the sea itself: every time our skin goes...