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rhyme

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Journal Article
English Language Notes (2001) 39 (1): 5–12.
Published: 01 September 2001
... will refer to this edition. 6 Stanley 26. 7 Stanley 23. 8 Richard L eighton G reene, ed. The Early English Carols (1935, St. Clair Shores, MI: Scholarly, 1971) 95. A NOTE ON ENGLISH RHYME IN THE HOLDERNESS DIALECT Medievalists, especially during the last forty years, have iden­ tified and discussed...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2005) 43 (2): 30–34.
Published: 01 December 2005
... that is ambitious, erratic, and often unintentionally comic.3 Ad­ mittedly, the situation is made m ore complicated by the fact that the True History contains patches displaying obvious literary com­ petence, including several hundred lines of regular rhyming cou­ plets. This note will argue, though, that many...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2004) 42 (1): 63–65.
Published: 01 September 2004
... The context in Lewis Carroll s romance supports that of the image in Dylan Thom as s lyric. The Lion is unhurt, and Thom as s characters, though dead, are un h u rt and experience a resurrection of sorts when their molecules ham m er through daisies (line 25). Apart from the original nursery rhyme...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2001) 39 (1): 27–32.
Published: 01 September 2001
..., where the night shineth as the day. T he hearten­ ing meanings implicit in the imagery of darkness in the first stanza becom e operative at the end o f stanza five. The rhyme sum m er all, festival, me call rips asunder any semicolon and links the two kinds of love. Like Since, the rhyme points...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2002) 40 (2): 29–47.
Published: 01 December 2002
... to Mrs. H em ans latest, Bring Flowers. T he lyric is quintessential H em ans six crafted sestets in rhymed tetram eter couplets, musical and meditative. Each stanza sketches a simple vignette, an occasion that calls for flowers. Five years later the em inent Francis Jeffrey would pronounce Mrs. H...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2021) 59 (1): 181–200.
Published: 01 April 2021
... of Minor’s critique to investigate this phenomenon. 49 Here, for instance, is “Marrakesh,” which opens with a description of the very walls that McKay’s rhyme scheme recalls: High ramparts, tombs and mosques and mansions vaunting Above the myriad huts of straw and clay, Against the palms and olive...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2005) 43 (2): 8–14.
Published: 01 December 2005
... (Anglo-Saxon hus), a mouse in a field (Latin rus). The rhyming and rhythm suggest non-serious verse, and prom pt the reader to imagine such com­ binations as the Anglo-Saxon seid, (building) and feld (field), or perhaps the Latin domus (house) as a close match with the lin­ guistically obscure dormouse...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2023) 61 (2): 23–38.
Published: 01 October 2023
... disunities.” 12 Its different distichs ( ashʿār ) are held together by an aural thread. Called a qāfiyah , this penultimate rhyme is a call for the various verses to congregate under one ghazal. Each set of verses, as it unfolds, runs to answer this call. We listen as verses run toward this aural...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2012) 50 (2): 41–47.
Published: 01 September 2012
...-i-b-l-e, yes, that's the book fo r me . . ." However, I didn't know w hat I was spelling, really only tha t the lan­ guage of the song had rhyme and the bounce of alliteration. Experience had tau ght me that w ords spelt instead of said were coded of necessity: they indicated som ething secret...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2008) 46 (1): 149–150.
Published: 01 March 2008
... 2008 15 0 E n g l is h L a n g u a g e N o t e s 46.1 S p r in g / S u m m e r 2 0 0 8 The w ord is drunk lit from within Reeling, forgotten to calendars Rhyming w ith no one Yet always in the company o f * Fathoms are what we cannot divine Your depths when we wake NOTE Parkour, or l'art du déplacem...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2002) 39 (4): 94–95.
Published: 01 June 2002
... literalism, narrative overdeterm ination, and u n ad o rn ed language. Their medley style o f varied m atter (including much improvisation and clowning) was reflected in the persistence of a variety of older forms o f dram atic verse, such as fourteeners, couplets, rhymed stanzas, and regularly end...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2009) 47 (1): 135–145.
Published: 01 March 2009
... ill, but most im portantly, through its engagement w ith the reader and in its m ateriality (such as its arrangement on the page, use o f punctuation and capitalization, its shape, rhyme, meter, and figurative language, et al.) can be understood as always already com ing into being. Philosophy...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2009) 47 (1): 181–182.
Published: 01 March 2009
... and singing. We learned them before we knew them, on the banks o f the Derwent, in our m other's o r our nurse's arms. The basic structure is like a double he lix one strand is linguistic a syntax and a seman­ tics the other is prosodic, made o f rhythmical and acoustic units (metre and rhyme). We practice...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2003) 40 (4): 1–10.
Published: 01 June 2003
... this breaks the clear fem inine rhyme of the stanza. Concerning this switch, Stevens and Cawley write, T here can be no doubt, in view o f the rhyme sequence, that husbandys (suggested in J. M. Manly s edition) is in ten d ed h ere. 7Since the use o f h usband to denote farm er is so rare in the Towneley...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2008) 46 (1): 147–148.
Published: 01 March 2008
... effort to reflect past or present tim e. When Laynie Browne writes, "The w ord is drunk / lit from w ith in / Reeling, forgotten to calendars / Rhyming w ith no one," she echoes ancient and present traditions in which we imagine language (especially poetic language) as som ehow standing outside of tim e...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2009) 47 (1): 173–180.
Published: 01 March 2009
... in w hat sense the swain "sang," there w ill likely be no guide at all and little, if any, discussion just a casual com m ent about "so ng " as a m etaphor for poetry. Let this com m ent gro w legs, and the resulting conversation w ill probably wander to poet­ ry's musical elements: its rhymes; its...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2012) 50 (2): 139–146.
Published: 01 September 2012
... of such is a journey. In Arabic the brief chapter is rhythm ically sublim e, its vow els opening out into sound and end-stopped rhyme, its consonants sonically stunning. It's easy to imagine it as the rolling waves of itself echoing through all the lines and chapters o f the Qur'an that fo llo w it, echo­ ing its...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2018) 56 (2): 44–47.
Published: 01 October 2018
..., this time with a one-syllable but still recognizable Anglicized name that just happens to rhyme with his legendarily favorite rape-able part of the female body: the rump. So on the day after the election, as I walked along in confused recollection of the TV spectacle from the night before, when...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2001) 39 (2): 59–69.
Published: 01 December 2001
... isread the textual evi­ dence. Because o f the verbal balance of enem y and frien d , I am the enemy you killed, my frien d makes for a m ore power­ ful line: the internal e n rhymes in bo th halves of the line p ro ­ duce an aural equilibrium that was missing before. As always, sound...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2012) 50 (2): 99–112.
Published: 01 September 2012
... pre-lslamic poetry as its modus operandi. The hallmark of this prophetic or poetic speech is rhymed prose (saf). The 114 chapters of the Qur'än text form a corpus of rhymed prose, the eloquence of which mesmerized the most learned of scholars, both the court and at the mosque. Out of adm iration fo r...