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caesar

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Journal Article
English Language Notes (2001) 39 (1): 12–23.
Published: 01 September 2001
..., 1987) II. 1795-96. ET TU, BRUTE AN INSTANCE OF CODE-SWITCHING IN JULIUS CAESAR A lthough Shakespeare sJulius Caesaris replete with phrases that have survived the four centuries since it was first perform ed in 1599, perhaps no one utterance is m ore noted than Caesar s Et tu, B rutèf 1spoken upon his...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2019) 57 (2): 86–98.
Published: 01 October 2019
...: Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar and Thomas Decker’s Juliohs Siza (a Krio translation of Julius Caesar from the late 1960s). Teaching the children Decker’s translation is Bemba G’s shamanic rite, which becomes the novel’s route through which to imagine, like Agnes, an alternative state. Considering...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2001) 39 (1): 23–27.
Published: 01 September 2001
...Piotr Sadowski Copyright © 2001 Regents of the University of Colorado 2001 Septem ber 2001 23 18For additional takes on S hakespeare s use o f rhetoric in Julius Caesar, see A nne B arton, Julius Caesar an d Coriolanus: S hakespeare s Rom an W orld of W ords, Shakespeare s Craft: Eight...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2001) 39 (1): 5–12.
Published: 01 September 2001
... Gower, trans. Eric Stockton (Seattle: U o f W ashington P, 1962) 184. 14 G eoffrey Chaucer, Summoner s Tale, The Riverside Chaucer, ed. Larry Benson, 3rd ed. (Boston: H oughton, 1987) II. 1795-96. ET TU, BRUTE AN INSTANCE OF CODE-SWITCHING IN JULIUS CAESAR A lthough Shakespeare sJulius Caesaris replete...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2002) 40 (1): 57–60.
Published: 01 September 2002
... Anthony s funeral oration in Julius Ceasar, as is so cued by Jack Chase s directorial, purser s steward, you are Mark Antony over the body ofJulius Caesar [For ease of visual comparison, I have blocked the units in pairs.]3 WhiteJacket [L] ook, my noble tars, if you have tears, prepare to shed them...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2002) 40 (1): 85–87.
Published: 01 September 2002
... from subtler clues in the text. Accordingly the dramatic characters that Levin interprets within their respective plays are not clear-cut Machiavels but often quite the reverse: Gaunt in Richard II, Fortinbras in Ham­ let, Lafew in All s Well thatEnds Well, Caesar in Antony and Cleopatra...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2001) 38 (4): 77–79.
Published: 01 June 2001
..., Titus Andronicus and Julius Caesar, are m olded by their rigidly patriarchal societies, constrained to live up the the nam es of their ancestors (91 ), while Verona in Romeo andJuliet is a wrongchoice society (71), as fixed in its conventions as the Petrarchan sonnet that inform s the play s style...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2000) 38 (2): 61–71.
Published: 01 December 2000
... qualities resem bling Nietzsche s hero, Augustus Caesar: he is ambitious, pitiless, de- Decem ber 2000 63 void of social morality and yet capable o f a terrible unflinching ju d g e m en t aim ed at the deform ities and incapacities of o th ­ ers.6W hat he seeks is radical and incredible. Nietzsche...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2001) 38 (4): 16–18.
Published: 01 June 2001
... in Julian C alendar introduced byJulius Caesar for the Romans. In this m ethod of com putation three days in the m onth were used for counting the date. These three were the Kalends (1st day of the m onth), the Nones (the 7th day in March, May, July, and October, the 5th in other m onths), and the Ides...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2004) 42 (1): 26–39.
Published: 01 September 2004
... aruorum cultu pecorumque canebam et super arboribus, Caesar dum magnus ad altum fulminât Euphraten bello uictorque uolentis per populos dat iura uiamque adfectat Olympo. ilio Vergilium me tem pore dulcís alebat Parthenope studiis florentem ignobilis oti, carm ina qui lusi pastorum audaxque iuuenta, Tityre...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2002) 40 (1): 29–41.
Published: 01 September 2002
... to the bleed­ ing piece of earth when he imagines that Caesar s spirit will come hot from hell and with a m onarch s voice / Cry havoc! and let slip the dogs of war (3.1.275-6). Those dogs are given individual names in the prologue to Shakespeare s Henry 5 where Harry is imagined holding the leashes...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2003) 41 (2): 66–71.
Published: 01 December 2003
... on the drowning of Icarus is real and evident enough in human expe­ rience. Fortunately it is neither universal nor inevitable, as the action of the Queen Elizabeth made clear. Perhaps Bernard Shaw offers the last word on human nature, ancient and modern, in his Prologue to Caesar and Cleopatra: . . . men twenty...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2004) 41 (3): 74–76.
Published: 01 March 2004
... of the uncertain political moment. Gunter Walch sets out to destabilize the characters inJulius Caesar, pointing to con­ nections which Shakespeare s audiences might perceive between republican revolutionaries and the Elizabethanjacobean scene. He is interested in showing how historical change becomes pal­ pable...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2001) 39 (1): 82–84.
Published: 01 September 2001
... playhouse were not available. Ian Donaldson considers Shakespeare s M ozartean Julius Caesar and Jo n so n s Tacitean Sejanus intertextually, as plays jo in ed in a conversation about late Republican Roman history. Philip Edwards meditates on the difficulty, for perform ers and audi­ ences...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2004) 42 (2): 11–28.
Published: 01 December 2004
... a similar conceit in Julius Caesar, written within a year, the description of blunt Casca (the first that reared his hand to stab Caesar) : This rudeness is a sauce to his good wit,/W hich gives m en stomach to digest his w ords,/ With better appetite (1.2.305). So, with a whole scene of bawdy behind...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2006) 44 (1): 183–189.
Published: 01 March 2006
... A ctivism and the U.S. Sanctuary M ovem ent (Boulder: W estview Press, 1993); Hilary Cunningham, God and Caesar a t the Rio Grande: Sanctuary and the Politics o f Religion (M inneapolis: U o f Minnesota F! 1995); and Robin Lorentzen, Women in the Sanc­ tuary M ovem ent (Philadelphia: Temple UP, 1991). 6...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2003) 41 (2): 71–82.
Published: 01 December 2003
... the fuel. Shaw, Prologue, Caesar and Cleopatra, in Selected Plays, 4 vols. (New York: Dodd, Mead, 1948-57) 3:361. A MENU FOR ALL SEASONS: JOHN LANCHESTER S THE DEBT TO PLEASUREAND THE NEW EUROPEAN NOVEL Were we to judge the book by its cover and take the narra­ tor at his word, indeed, at his very first...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2002) 40 (1): 43–57.
Published: 01 September 2002
..., you are Mark Antony over the body ofJulius Caesar [For ease of visual comparison, I have blocked the units in pairs.]3 WhiteJacket [L] ook, my noble tars, if you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this boot. I rem em ber the first time ever old Bob put it on. Twas on ...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2020) 58 (2): 50–63.
Published: 01 October 2020
... particularly on temporality. The ancient Britons, in the time of Caesar painted their bodies, as the present Cherokees of North America; because it would naturally enough occur to the wild people of every country, that by this practice they might render themselves terrible to their enemies: Nor...
Journal Article
English Language Notes (2008) 46 (1): 75–87.
Published: 01 March 2008
... Hill makes again in the Life Boat, using Julius Caesar as his aversive example. Pronouns are, however, shifters, their meaning always referential and contextual, emerging from the im m ediate instance of speech. Like the newspaper, in other words, pronouns affiliate themselves w ith the tim e of speech...