I am the Black Atlantic and the Blue Pacific. In my family tree, diaspora and Indigenous worlds are not binary; they are interconnected through histories of love, war, racism, military occupation, betrayal, trauma, migration, planting, and the sanctity of family on and off the island of Guåhan. In this photographic article, I chronicle a memoir and choreographic practice inspired by tracing my Black Pacific heritage. Oral histories shared with me by my Chamoru aunt Rosa1 and my late Black/African American grandfather Albert are juxtaposed to descriptions of sensuous engagements with the landscape of Barigåda, my ancestral village located near the center of Guåhan (fig. 1). The island is located in the northwestern Pacific region and is a member of a fifteen-island archipelago called the Marianas—the land of the Indigenous Chamoru people. Guåhan is known to the world as Guam and often associated with its role as a...

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