A fifth-/eleventh- and sixth-/twelfth-century figure associated with al-Andalus, Ibn ʿAbdūn is known for his Arabic manual offering guidance to the market inspector (muḥtasib) on how the Almoravid (434/1042–530/1147) city of Seville should be administered and regulated. Some directives presented in the text appear to focus on commercial aspects of urban life, such as the following: “Truffles should not be sold around the mosque, for this is a delicacy of the dissolute.”1 Other dictates seem to concentrate more explicitly on religion and interactions among adherents of monotheistic religious traditions. In this regard, Ibn ʿAbdūn notes, “Books of science should not be sold to Jews and Christians, except to their religious authorities, as they translate them and attribute them to themselves as well as to their bishops when they are from Muslim authors.”2 In the same vein, Ibn...

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