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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2005) 29 (2): 47–90.
Published: 01 April 2005
...Lynn Festa Duke University Press 2005 Personal Eff ects: Wigs and Possessive Individualism in the Long Eighteenth Century Lynn Festa Harvard University...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2003) 27 (2): 49–66.
Published: 01 April 2003
... Like clothes, all of these features “are not read as naturalistic attributes of an individual in eighteenth-century society, but understood as components in a language.”20 Gentlemen of the age were generally clean-shaven and wore wigs over their own hair, which had thus to be cropped quite closely...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2005) 29 (2): 1–2.
Published: 01 April 2005
..., tea-drinking, and wigs (see current issue). It is clear from such a list that scholars in the fi eld have a strong sense of Eighteenth-Century Life’s inter- ests, or, going back to the statement of purpose, a strong sense of what constitutes “eighteenth-century life.” We hope to continue...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2001) 25 (2): 170–182.
Published: 01 April 2001
... creatures,” and were compared variously to monsters, devils, reptiles, women, monkeys, asses and butterflies.3 Their concern for elaborate clothing, including tight trou- sers, large wigs, short coats, and small hats made them the ridicule of their generation, who...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2012) 36 (1): 93–97.
Published: 01 January 2012
..., “The eighteenthcentury self reached its most lively articulation through the material objects we traditionally consider as trivial imitations or supplements of the human: dolls, machines, puppets, wigs, muffs, hats, pens, letters, bound books, and fictional narratives.” Park claims that these objects not only...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2012) 36 (1): 113–117.
Published: 01 January 2012
.... The final chapter combines literature with practice, and fashion with political action. Cognizant of recent “hair pieces,” like the special issue of Eighteenth-­Century Studies and Lynn Festa’s essay on wigs in Eighteenth- ­C e n t u r y L i f e , Russell claims that the high heads, or big hair...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2023) 47 (1): 1–34.
Published: 01 January 2023
...” appears lounging on “Velvet Cushions” in a “long Perriwig.” 23 The recumbent posture, together with cushions and wig, feminized the English admiral into a French “Beau,” horrifying Addison with a misrepresentation of the most intractable sort. He understood what the monument intended: that Shovell...
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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (1): 18–62.
Published: 01 January 2014
... prominent beak-­like nose, his chin looks sharper than humanly possible, and his mouth is twisted into an expression of rage. His wig has fallen off his head, revealing several dark scars on his scalp. To the right, a number of witnesses laugh at Lismahago, signaling that we too should find his...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2008) 32 (2): 39–59.
Published: 01 April 2008
... and shows a remarkable similarity to the pictorial representation of the aged nabob: the two figures share the same pose, orientation, style of dress, form of wig, and even an identical Imaging the Nabob through “Upstart Iconography”     5 1 hat (figure 7). John Brewer claims...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2008) 32 (2): 14–28.
Published: 01 April 2008
... There is something awful in the thought of a writer undertaking to give a detailed picture of the actions of a perfectly virtuous being. Sir Charles Grandison, with his wig and his sword, his high heels, his bows, his smiles, his Johnsonian compliments, his irreproachable tone, his moderation...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2000) 24 (2): 1–42.
Published: 01 April 2000
... Bubble prints, the hunchback in a French print (by A. Humblot) depict- ing the rue Quinquempoix in Paris is realistically presented in a full-bot- tomed wig and frock coat (see Rue Quinquempoix en l’Année 1720 [Plate 12 Whatever the degree of historical factuality that actually underlay...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2001) 25 (2): 201–213.
Published: 01 April 2001
... address’d to rather as the Son of a Man of Condition than a Servant put to learn a Trade for his future SubsistenceI have seen a prim young Fellow, with a Cue or Adonis, as they call the effemi- nate Wigs of the present Vogue, plaister’d rather than...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2011) 35 (2): 1–17.
Published: 01 April 2011
... to seek truth in this manner, I suppose one can only recommend peace, or, to find my concluding words yet again in Tristram Shandy: “I have no abhorrence whatever, nor do I detest and abjure either great wigs or long beards,  any further than when I see they are bespoke and let grow on purpose...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2020) 44 (2): 136–157.
Published: 01 April 2020
.... The left side shows Godfrey s body lying crum- pled in a field: he has lost his wig, been run through from the front with a sword, and his hat is placed upon a bush, all details that had been included in the pamphlet accounts of the discovery of his body. The final panel depicts a funeral cortege...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2002) 26 (1): 119–135.
Published: 01 January 2002
... voluminous cloak (domino), with male accessories such as wig, cravat, and hat; even if ECL26107-135-crow.q4 5/24/02 1:58 PM Page 127 Sporting with Clothes 127 breeches were worn they would not have been seen. (Men, however, often...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2004) 28 (1): 92–114.
Published: 01 January 2004
... a mole, and the flatterer an ear- wig.11 Given this background, “The Mouse’s Petition” can reasonably be seen as a condemnation of animal experimentation. To aid the reader who may be unfamiliar with Barbauld’s poem, I reproduce it here: Oh! Hear a pensive prisoner’s prayer, For liberty...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2006) 30 (3): 107–134.
Published: 01 September 2006
... equestrian acrobatics, the “celebrated” Mr. Wildman would ride “with a swarm of bees on his arm, then on his head, which will imitate a bob-wig,” the bottom locks of which were turned up into bobs or short curls (fi gure 5). Wildman’s wearing of the bee hairpiece, clearly the eighteenth-century...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2011) 35 (2): 76–101.
Published: 01 April 2011
...- tion, or at least forbearance, had become the basis of a new urbanity, and when two gentlemen of the Beaus’ Club met, they in fact served to enhance one anothers’ performance, so that Sr. Fopling Flutters, and Sr. Courtly Nices, are no sooner met, but there is such tiffling of  Wigs...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2013) 37 (1): 72–96.
Published: 01 January 2013
... brother Maurice.17 Dressed in draped garments that vaguely recall ancient Greece, wearing caps or loose turbans instead of wigs, the pair pauses on a sylvan path, with a small classical temple just behind. Anthony leans on Maurice’s shoulder as the younger sibling raises his hand in a gesture...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (3): 64–99.
Published: 01 September 2014
... was miserable. The party encountered many “wig-whams” and a “large raft,” but no Beothuk. By the fifth morning, George Cartwright “and four of his party, having worn out their shoes, were obliged to return.” On the sixth morning, three more men turned back, and the “whole 94   Eighteenth-Century Life...